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Who gets your vote for Mayor of Toronto?

  • Ana Bailao

    Votes: 18 16.4%
  • Brad Bradford

    Votes: 3 2.7%
  • Olivia Chow

    Votes: 58 52.7%
  • Mitzie Hunter

    Votes: 2 1.8%
  • Josh Matlow

    Votes: 20 18.2%
  • Mark Saunders

    Votes: 4 3.6%
  • Other

    Votes: 5 4.5%

  • Total voters
    110
  • Poll closed .
This field is getting sooooo crowded, which wouldn't be a bad thing if we had ranked ballots. We'll probably end up with someone winning 31% of the vote and getting "Strong Mayor" powers.
Agreed. Inexcusable to create a strong mayor system without ranked ballots. If the mayor is a consequential figure in running the city, it warrants a serious process to select them.
 
The Star out with piece this morning (behind the paywall) which looks at how the City is (NOT) meeting its goals on affordable housing.

The metric they are using is the old John Tory promise of 40,000 affordable rental units by 2030.


From the above:

1679485142166.png


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1679485182053.png


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Good to see the City's top housing czar aware of something:

“Although nothing will ever be built that isn’t approved, it’s also true that you can’t live in an approval,” Bond said.

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1679485254195.png


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To look at that above collectively is to see public officials and pols with their heads buried in the sand.

1) They have failed to come anywhere close to their own goals.

2) If every single one of those 40,000 (as yet fictional) units were delivered tomorrow, and if everyone on the waiting list for public housing could afford them, there would still be 45,500 households in need of housing, if Toronto stopped adding people.

3) The rents being charged are mostly well beyond what those households can manage; meaning we need to get back to deeply affordable/RGI housing, at least, as a portion of the solution.

4) Toronto is growing. In the absence of radical changes in Federal/Provincial policy, that needs to be taken into account. If Toronto adds an average of 70,000 residents per year, or 700,000 over the next decade, IF the market stabilized, you would still expect the proportion of folks in need to remain constant. That's about 5% (I think that's low, but I digress); 5% is an additional 20,600 households in need (700, 000 / 1.7 gives number of households x 0.05)

The hole just keeps getting deeper.
 
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Agreed. Inexcusable to create a strong mayor system without ranked ballots. If the mayor is a consequential figure in running the city, it warrants a serious process to select them.

I suspect you'll see a lot of candidates commit to not using the strong mayor powers, with the possible exception of housing votes.
 
As someone relatively unfamiliar with Chow, not sure what I could expect.

Can someone smarter than me kindly share what she was like on Council?
 
As someone relatively unfamiliar with Chow, not sure what I could expect.

Can someone smarter than me kindly share what she was like on Council?

If I am not mistaken, she lived in social housing with Jack while working off a councilors salary?

I like Olivia and no doubt she would make a fine mayor but she is past her prime. She has been out of the political fray so long that not many will vote for her.
 
I suspect you'll see a lot of candidates commit to not using the strong mayor powers, with the possible exception of housing votes.

Probably an empty promise anyways. If a progressive mayor gets in and tries to use strong mayor powers for anything other than housing, Ford will just deem it not a provincial priority and disallow it.
 
If I am not mistaken, she lived in social housing with Jack while working off a councilors salary?

I like Olivia and no doubt she would make a fine mayor but she is past her prime. She has been out of the political fray so long that not many will vote for her.

I believe Layton and Chow lived in rent-geared-to-income housing in a co-op.
 
If I am not mistaken, she lived in social housing with Jack while working off a councilors salary?

I like Olivia and no doubt she would make a fine mayor but she is past her prime. She has been out of the political fray so long that not many will vote for her.
I believe Layton and Chow lived in rent-geared-to-income housing in a co-op.

1679494536596.png


Taken from: https://torontoist.com/2014/03/did-jack-layton-and-olivia-chow-live-in-subsidized-housing/
 
Today I don't think this would be a story. We're at a point that public housing is needed for teachers, nurses, lawyers, and approaching councillors (if they are single - 30% of a council salary after taxes is getting close) - not just those minimum wage workers/low income workers we traditionally think are in need of subsidized housing. A single income paying over $2500 (average 1 bedroom apartment) does not leave much for food, kid(s), transportation, media, heat.
 
As someone relatively unfamiliar with Chow, not sure what I could expect.

Can someone smarter than me kindly share what she was like on Council?
According to the Anyone But Chow campaign as a councilor wanted the city to borrow to the limit and then default on those loans.
She opposed cutting perks for Councilors, cuts to Councilors salary, and had one of the highest office budgets.
 

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