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JonnyCanuck

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It is pretty much consensus now that inflation is not transitory. Some damage is done and if left undeterred, further inflation will cause great harm to the economy and to the livelihood of every one of us. Our PM and his financial wizards are going to have to come terms with monetary policy even though he does not think it important ....to him, that is. There is a faction in the financial community that does not think rates will be raised for fear of bringing the economy to a screeching halt. Judging from the current stock market, investors don't think rates are going up either even though it has been signaled they will. Will rates go up or won't they? What is worse ... status quo or combating inflation with rate hikes?
 

darwink

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Good thing is CAD$ is going up, which will take some price pressure off. As will it on exports, which will be an automatic stabilizing effect and help hold off rate hikes by making CAD priced exports less attractive, slowing business investment.

And transitory or not, we were below. Now we're above. I'm not worried. And why wouldn't a Bank want a return to more regular interest rates? It isn't like they're a disinterested observer.
 

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adamyyc

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JustDandy

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It is pretty much consensus now that inflation is not transitory. Some damage is done and if left undeterred, further inflation will cause great harm to the economy and to the livelihood of every one of us. Our PM and his financial wizards are going to have to come terms with monetary policy even though he does not think it important ....to him, that is. There is a faction in the financial community that does not think rates will be raised for fear of bringing the economy to a screeching halt. Judging from the current stock market, investors don't think rates are going up either even though it has been signaled they will. Will rates go up or won't they? What is worse ... status quo or combating inflation with rate hikes?

i have a hunch that interest rates won't go up by any meaningful amount, and the impacts to the GTA and Vancouver housing markets will be a temporary blip. Things have moved so far so fast people are sitting on a stupid amount of gains, hell one of my presale properties is sitting on a nearly $400k equity gain since July 2020.

I'm still looking to pick up a Calgary property as an investment and de facto contingency exit plan.
 

Surrealplaces

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"Calgary's affordable cost of living, well-educated workforce and quality of life were cited as key factors behind the company's decision"

Basically the same reasons my employer decided to make Calgary its backup hub.
 

darwink

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Generations ago London, Ontario was the backup. Now they're part of the main hub, not affordable for early, mid career professionals, and Calgary is the main game in town. It is unfortunate we had the tough medicine of the past 5 years, but the next 10 are going to be even stronger because of it.
 
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Chowda7

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Silence&Motion

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Generations ago London, Ontario was the backup. Now they're part of the main hub, not affordable for early, mid career professionals, and Calgary is the main game in town. It is unfortunate we had the tough medicine of the past 5 years, but the next 10 are going to be even stronger because of it.
Ontario's small/mid-sized cities are really interesting from an urbanization perspective (especially compared to bigger, younger cities like Calgary). On the one hand, they have good bones from having city centers that were developed pre-WWII and that didn't face the same massive demolitions that occurred due to the skyscraper booms in places like Calgary and Toronto. A lot of them have universities that have kept an urban/bohemian culture alive over the decades (indie theatres, concert clubs, bookstores, etc).

On the other hand, over the decades, their local governments have embraced just about every flavour-of-the-month economic development strategy in the toolbox of a declining, backwater town: half-empty suburban-style malls occupying several downtown blocks, casinos surrounded by surface parking, fortress-style government office buildings, etc. It's still happening. Brantford recently demolished several blocks of 200-year-old commercial buildings to make room for a single big-box YMCA with zero active frontage. It's the kind of thing you do when the electorate of your town is comprised of cantankerous fogies or exurban commuters who live there only because they can afford a McMansion and still make the daily drive into the GTA for work.
 

ByeByeBaby

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Stephen Ave

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Vancouver and Toronto are where most of the money is going, but good that Calgary is on the list. I wonder where some of the other cities like Edmonton, Ottawa or Winnipeg sit?
 

Stephen Ave

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