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Fresco

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Never been on vacation on to a Caribbean resort? Or a cruise? Outside of North America or the Middle East, why not? After breakfast, why not?
I dont like that though. Earliest for me would be 1 or 2pm.
The thought of drinking at 10am makes me wanna throw up
 

W. K. Lis

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I dont like that though. Earliest for me would be 1 or 2pm.
The thought of drinking at 10am makes me wanna throw up
There are countries around the world where they serve beer at McDonald's.

See link.

From 2015 (link)...

Is booze at breakfast the best way to start the day?

a68a76b9-3244-4325-b378-e81e19483088-2060x1236.jpeg
Barack Obama with his breakfast beer. Photograph: Markus Schreiber/AP

Barack Obama enjoyed a breakfast beer at the G7 summit and a London bar is now serving morning wine. From bloody mary to brandy, an early tipple is a fine European tradition

The sight of Barack Obama downing a pint at his pre-G7 summit Alpine breakfast on Sunday was surprising and cheering in equal measure. Drinking early in the day doesn’t usually come with such official approbation. We tend to think of morning drinks in extremes – a bloody mary or swift half to provide a much-needed quick fix after a long night, or perhaps bubbles for special occasion breakfasts. However, in many parts of the world, booze at breakfast is seen as a perfectly normal way to start the day.

The weisswurst frühstück Obama was enjoying is a beery Bavarian stalwart: boiled sausages with mustard, freshly baked pretzels and a cold weissbier, the operative word here being cold. Alcohol in the morning must be fresh and zippy. A bit of fizz, something dry, a hint of sweetness, a sharp kick – as drinks writer Henry Jeffreys puts it, “it’s the pick-me-up that makes you mellow”. Beer or ale for breakfast is not uncommon in the rest of northern Europe, particularly in Belgium – and even, until as late as the 1980s, in England, where breweries would give free drinks to their workers. While this was probably to counter pilfering, it also continued a long tradition of brewers enjoying a hearty brew to start the day, harking back to the “liquid bread” of 16th-century friars. It would seem there is more to an early-morning pint than just hair of the dog.
Around the Mediterranean, you’ll often see older patrons having a caffè corretto, the espresso quite literally “corrected” with a shot of something stronger: grappa, sambuca or brandy. It is a habit Mitch Tonks and Mat Prowse adopted at a fish market in Spain 15 years ago; they call it their morning fire. The grappa is sometimes substituted with armagnac, Fernet-Branca or whatever other local spirit the two chefs encounter on their travels. “It takes the body by surprise,” writes Tonks in his new cookbook, The Seahorse. “We have found that in this moment of lightness and clarity we have made our best decisions.” Which makes the Seahorse restaurant staff living proof that drinking in the day might not actually render working minds as useless as you’d think. It’s all about being restrained: “The trick is to have just one glass,” says Tonks, “otherwise the surprise is spoiled.”

London wine bar Vinoteca has just opened a Kings Cross branch, the first to serve breakfast. “You don’t have to not drink wine early in the day,” counsels co-owner Brett Woonton. Woonton and his partner, Charlie Young, focused on bottles that would work best with breakfast, plumping for lightness and freshness over full-bodied heft; drinks that would be accessible and approachable. So they have got a pink moscato, the sweet, fruity fizz of which sits handsomely with a plate of pancakes; a slightly frizzante, dry red bonarda that cuts judiciously through the richness of a meaty breakfast; and a German riesling to pair with fresh fruit or muesli.
 
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Fresco

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There are countries around the world where they serve beer at McDonald's.

See link.

From 2015 (link)...

Is booze at breakfast the best way to start the day?

a68a76b9-3244-4325-b378-e81e19483088-2060x1236.jpeg
Barack Obama with his breakfast beer. Photograph: Markus Schreiber/AP

Barack Obama enjoyed a breakfast beer at the G7 summit and a London bar is now serving morning wine. From bloody mary to brandy, an early tipple is a fine European tradition
Hey now, I'm Dutch dont tell me about drinking or drugs ⚽
 

W. K. Lis

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Denmark considering leaving FIFA and discussing legal action with England


From link.

Denmark is considering quitting FIFA and is discussing taking legal action against the body with England after players were banned from wearing 'One Love' armbands during the World Cup.

Homosexuality is illegal in Qatar, and is punishable with up to seven years in prison.

And prior to the controversial tournament, a host of European countries had planned on wearing special armbands, which were designed to act as a subtle nod to the LGBTQ+ community.
However, it was announced this week that FIFA had pulled the plug on the plans, with the organisation threatening to impose harsh sanctions on the teams.

Following the decision, the Danish football federation chief executive Jakob Jensen said he was in talks with the participating nations, which includes England and Wales, about taking legal action against FIFA.
He said: "Now we’re looking into what are the legal options, we are co-ordinating our discussions on that as well but at this point it is not possible to go to CAS [Court of Arbitration for Sports].

"The Germans are looking into the legal possibilities. It’s very different than going through CAS.

"If you want to go through CAS you need to complain within the FIFA system first, you need to go to the appeals body, then you can go through CAS."

Beyond this, Jensen said the Danes have also been thinking about leaving FIFA all together.

"It is not a decision that has been made now. We have been clear about this for a long time. We have been discussing it in the Nordic region since August," he said.

“I have to think about the question of how to restore confidence in FIFA. We must evaluate what has happened, and then we must create a strategy – also with our Nordic colleagues.”

The English FA said it was disappointed by FIFA's decision to ban the 'One Love' armbands.
As national federations, we can’t put our players in a position where they could face sporting sanctions including bookings, so we have asked the captains not to attempt to wear the armbands in FIFA World Cup games.

"We were prepared to pay fines that would normally apply to breaches of kit regulations and had a strong commitment to wearing the armband.

"However, we cannot put our players in the situation where they might be booked or even forced to leave the field of play."

LADbible has contacted the English FA for a comment.

"We were prepared to pay fines that would normally apply to breaches of kit regulations and had a strong commitment to wearing the armband.

"However, we cannot put our players in the situation where they might be booked or even forced to leave the field of play."

LADbible has contacted the English FA for a comment.
 

W. K. Lis

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Germany players cover mouths at World Cup in FIFA protest

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image.jpg


Germany's players covered their mouths for the team photo before their opening World Cup match on Wednesday to protest against FIFA following the governing body's clampdown on the “One Love” armband.

The Germany team lined up in the traditional formation before its game against Japan and all 11 players covered their mouths with their right hands in a coordinated gesture.

“It was a sign from the team, from us, that FIFA is muzzling us,” Germany coach Hansi Flick said after the match, which his team lost 2-1.

The gesture was a response to FIFA’s effective nixing of seven European teams' plans to wear armbands that were seen as a rebuke to host nation Qatar and its human rights record.

Team captains, including Germany captain Manuel Neuer, had planned to wear the armband with the heart-shaped, multicolored logo, a symbol for inclusion and diversity. But the seven federations backed down after FIFA made it clear they would face consequences if they did not.

“We may have our bands taken away from us, but we'll never let our voices be taken from us,” Neuer said. “We stand for human rights. That's what we wanted to show. We may have been silenced by FIFA regarding the captain's armbands, but we always stand for our values.”

Neuer said the idea for the mouth-covering gesture came from the team.

“We really wanted to do something and we thought about what we could do," Neuer said. "It was clear that we wanted to send a signal.”

FIFA said Germany will not face disciplinary action for the gesture.

Against Japan, Neuer wore an armband with the FIFA-approved “No Discrimination” slogan, though it was hard to see under the sleeve of his jersey. Neuer said it was too loose and that it kept slipping.

The German soccer federation posted a statement on Twitter during Wednesday's game stating its position.

“With our captain’s armband, we wanted to send a signal for values that we live in the national team: diversity and mutual respect. Being loud together with other nations.

"It’s not a political message: human rights are nonnegotiable. That should be obvious. Unfortunately it still isn’t. That’s why this message is so important to us,” the federation said. "Denying us the armband is like muzzling us. Our stance stands."

Qatar has been under scrutiny for its human rights record and laws criminalizing homosexuality.

FIFA issued its warning to the federations on Monday, hours before England and the Netherlands were set to play with their captains wearing the “One Love” armbands. The governing body said the players would immediately be shown a yellow card and could face further consequences.

German soccer federation president Bernd Neuendorf called the warning “another low blow” from FIFA.

German Interior Minister Nancy Faeser, who is also responsible for sports, wore a “One Love” armband in the stands at the Germany game, where she was sitting beside FIFA president Gianni Infantino. Faeser posted a photo of herself on Twitter wearing it with the hashtag #OneLove.

News agency DPA reported that Faeser had the armband on under a pink blazer that she took off during the first half.

Earlier, Faeser criticized Qatar for forcing a German fan to remove a rainbow-colored armband and headband at another game.

“This is not in line with my understanding of the security guarantees that I was given by the (Qatari) interior minister,” Faeser said. “Security must apply to all people. I’m very disappointed about this.”

The rainbow flag is a widely used as a symbol of tolerance with regard to sexual diversity.

Faeser said "such symbols should be openly shown.”

At a later match, Belgian Foreign Minister Hadja Lahbib wore the “One Love” armband when she met with Infantino at her country’s game against Canada. She also posted a photo of herself on Twitter wearing the band.
 

Fresco

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People are getting sick of all this stuff.
Protest on your own time, but stop mixing politics with sports please.

German fans agree: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/s...rmany-DESERVED-lose-Japan-focus-politics.html

Others claimed Germany 'let the politics get to their head' while one fan insisted that Germany needed to 'respect Qatar's culture' on Wednesday.

They tweeted: 'You Germans deserve this for your stupid virtue signalling, respect Qatar's culture and keep your stupid politics out of football.'
 

gabe

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There are countries around the world where they serve beer at McDonald's.

See link.

From 2015 (link)...

Is booze at breakfast the best way to start the day?

a68a76b9-3244-4325-b378-e81e19483088-2060x1236.jpeg
Barack Obama with his breakfast beer. Photograph: Markus Schreiber/AP

Barack Obama enjoyed a breakfast beer at the G7 summit and a London bar is now serving morning wine. From bloody mary to brandy, an early tipple is a fine European tradition

Won't be drinking in Qatar, alcohol is banned! Along with wearing rainbow's. Unlike other key religions, Islam hasn’t been reformed since it’s inception. Islam is still stuck in the Stone Age.

FiIMigOXwAEMNQ4


 

gabe

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Fresco

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There were protest against Germany in 1936 when they hosted the Olympics. Do you disagree than no one should've protested Nazi Germany in 1936?
You can protest all you want, just stop mixing it with sports please.
There are many injustices in the world:

- Children are being abused all over the world. Do they get an armband??
- There is still to this day slavery in many parts of Africa. Do they get an armband??
- Right now allegedly there are a million Uyghurs being held in concentration camps in China. Do they get an armband??
- There are many 3rd world countries where women have almost no rights and are assaulted daily. Do they get an armband??

I could go on and on.

So why do LGBQT people keep demanding we protest on their behalf??
Are they special or something??
Do other marginalized groups not get a voice??

Most people I talk to are getting tired of it now
 

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