yonderbean

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9626479494_4aff5b530a_b.jpg


9623240751_455204c626_b.jpg
 

arvelomcquaig

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Is this building not designated for heritage protection? If not, what does it take? Buildings that are so old should be automatically protected against demolition, at least by giving the City the prerogative as to whether it must be preserved.
 

greenleaf

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I really love this building.

I'm concerned that unless there was some social/cultural significance to the building or architect, it will go. There have been some quite lovely old buildings around Yonge between Wellesley and Charles area that have not met enough of the heritage criteria to be saved. This is where a Heritage Conservation District is quite useful. It helps the case for buildings like this.
 
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seriously. and in addition to the loss of such a cool little building, you have the loss of 4 small retail spaces, to be replaced with 1-2 large ones. this is something that's happening all over north america, as small commercial spaces that work for entry-level and local businesses are disappearing with redevelopment, giving way to large format spaces that almost necessarily mean a chain shop coming in. the next frontier in urban activism in toronto is a two-planked call for (a) small format commercial spaces in dense areas and (b) formula retail restrictions in designated neighborhoods, as exist in san francisco and other places (does kensignton market already have this?). the formed would ensure that smaller and newer and local businesses could get a shot at affordable retail space in the core, and the latter would ensure that businesses that have 10+ locations are prevented from entering certain designated neighborhoods, in order that some sort of local character might be preserved.
 

arvelomcquaig

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Why can't there simply be a maximum width requirement for street-level retail, and banks be relegated to the second floor or higher? Somewhere in NYC that's the case and that seems like the perfect way of addressing this sterile chain retail influx. It seems like such a perfectly logical regulation (which, I suppose, means that, at least under Ford, it will NEVER happen).
 

greenleaf

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Well, it appears it is not quite everything, but most of the structure: http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2013.PB25.5

"This report recommends that City Council state its intention to designate the properties at 233-237 College Street and 189 Huron Street under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for their cultural heritage value. Located on the southeast corner of College and Huron Streets, the site contains a commercial block historically known as the John Davison Buildings (1890)."

From the report:
"Staff have completed the attached Heritage Property Research and Evaluation Report (Attachment No. 3) and determined that the properties at 233-237 College Street and 189 Huron Street meet Ontario Regulation 9/06, the criteria prescribed for municipal designation. The property at 183 College Street, built in 1909 for the College Apartments, and the vacant portions of the site at 231 College and 177 Huron
are not identified for designation.

The properties at 233-237 College Street and 189 Huron Street are worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for their cultural heritage value, and meet the criteria for municipal designation prescribed by the Province of Ontario under the categories of design and contextual values. The John Davison Buildings at 233-237 College Street and 189 Huron Street are valued
as highly crafted representative examples of late 19th century commercial structures from the late Victorian era with Italianate styling, which are distinguished by the chamfered or bevelled northwest corner
and the application of elaborate brickwork and fine terra cotta detailing that is increasingly rare on commercial buildings.

Anchoring the southeast corner of College and Huron Streets, the John Davison are historically and visually linked to their surroundings, providing a prominent historical transition from the institutional and
commercial precinct on College Street to the surviving late 19th century residential community southeast of College Street and Spadina Avenue."
 

One Nut Kruk

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On the note of heritage -- can someone please answer a question for me? I've contacted heritage services and they haven't bothered to respond to this same question. There are several buildings I want to nominate, but I'm uncertain about something. At the end of the form (the digital one), it mentions that one has to sign their name. Since this is a digital form, I would guess that typing my name is sufficient -- since I wouldn't be able to sign it with pen?
 
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adHominem

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On the note of heritage -- can someone please answer a question for me? I've contacted heritage services and they haven't bothered to respond to this same question. There are several buildings I want to nominate, but I'm uncertain about something. At the end of the form (the digital one), it mentions that one has to sign their name. Since this is a digital form, I would guess that typing my name is sufficient -- since I wouldn't be able to sign it with pen?

If you happen to be using a Mac running Lion or later, you can sign PDFs using the Preview app: http://osxdaily.com/2011/08/17/sign-pdf-with-digital-signature-mac-os-x/
 

DtTO

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I agree that the facade should probably be saved, but I'm not sure I agree with the retail restrictions (aside from banks being relegated to the second floor) that many are talking about. Do we really want all of Toronto's retail to look as trashy as Yonge Street? If those restrictions ever came into force, we would basically have Aura's basement being replicated in the storefronts in new condos. No thanks.
 

AlbertC

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