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WislaHD

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Perhaps but just like a cancer diagnosis, if you don't have hope you have nothing. Till then, it's best to focus on the screens rather than what it's attached to. And never go inside... it's soul destroying, I did it once 6 years ago and I'm still not fully over it.

That is usually not an option to some. It is the best access point to the north-bound Dundas platform, Ryerson students heavily frequent the inside, and with Scotiabank shutting down, it will become the go-to cinema in the downtown area.

It'll depend on how they price it. When the UPX started out, there weren't that many railfans. Now, it's packed.

Ripley's Aquarium was expected to do okay, but it does very well. Make an impression beyond what people are expecting, and you just never know…

42

I have to imagine that part of Ripley's Aquarium's success is down to there not being much other attractions to visit in Toronto.

I honestly have no clue where tourists to this city go. When I am asked by visiting friends where to go, I do usually tell them Ripley's Aquarium because honestly what else is there to do aside from the ROM and AGO? Ripley's Aquarium is the top Toronto attraction according to TripAdvisor probably for the same reason.

The very last place I would ever send a tourist is Yonge-Dundas Square. Could not think of a more miserable and decrepit representation of this city than Yonge-Dundas. The square and intersection is where I would send someone if I really disliked them.
 

yyzhyd

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...
I have to imagine that part of Ripley's Aquarium's success is down to there not being much other attractions to visit in Toronto.

I honestly have no clue where tourists to this city go. When I am asked by visiting friends where to go, I do usually tell them Ripley's Aquarium because honestly what else is there to do aside from the ROM and AGO? Ripley's Aquarium is the top Toronto attraction according to TripAdvisor probably for the same reason...

Hmmm really? Just off the top of my head...

CN Tower
Ripley's Aquarium
Roundhouse Park/Train Museum
ROM
AGO
Fort York
Science Centre
Centre Island/Waterfront
Casa Loma
Hockey Hall of Fame
Kensington Market
St. Lawrence Market
Bata Show Museum
Mink Mile
High Park
Scarborough Bluffs
Canada's Wonderland
LegoLand
Toronto Zoo
Aga Khan Museum
Black Creek Pioneer Village
Chinatown (spadina)
Greektown
Little Italy
Gardiner Museum
Woodbine Racetrack/Casino

Seasonal:
CNE
Taste of the Danforth
Caribana
Pride
TIFF
Wet&Wild

Lots of other festivals and smaller museums I've left off but you get the idea.
No shortage of things to do in Toronto.
 

interchange42

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I honestly have no clue where tourists to this city go. When I am asked by visiting friends where to go, I do usually tell them Ripley's Aquarium because honestly what else is there to do aside from the ROM and AGO? Ripley's Aquarium is the top Toronto attraction according to TripAdvisor probably for the same reason.

The very last place I would ever send a tourist is Yonge-Dundas Square. Could not think of a more miserable and decrepit representation of this city than Yonge-Dundas. The square and intersection is where I would send someone if I really disliked them.
What is this, tryouts for the high school drama club? I wouldn't take anyone just to Yonge Dundas Square either, but I would to City Hall and the Eaton Centre and Ryerson and Yonge Street, and as it's on the way, I'd happily lead them through Yonge Dundas Square and explain how it came to be and how it's evolved. To want to hide it from shame seems like an OTT reaction of ridiculous proportions. If there was a movie I/we wanted to catch, into the building we'd go, as I've done countless times, and if there was a miniature world downstairs that was of interest, in we'd go. Do I think the square is the most beautiful thing in any city anywhere? Nope, but there's lots of interest here, there are urban planning lessons to share, there's people watching to do as the area is constantly packed, there will soon be yet-another sign of ridiculous dimensions to be dazzled by, so wonderful, there's no other place like it in Canada. That's good for two reasons.

42
 

Tuscani01

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So halfway! ... after 6 months. Only 6 months to go! ?

... ?

In fairness, a much smaller screen at the Science Centre just finished installation last week, after starting 2 weeks ago. This screen is probably 80x the size of that one, so 6 months sounds about right. I feel like lead time on LED's is high right now, which could be slowing down this installation. I had a project quoted a few months ago with a 9 month lead time on an 8'x12' screen. Indoor screens had shorter lead times, but the project required outdoor specs to ensure visibility in bright light conditions.
 

interchange42

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Hmmm really? Just off the top of my head...

CN Tower
Ripley's Aquarium
Roundhouse Park/Train Museum
ROM
AGO
Fort York
Science Centre
Centre Island/Waterfront
Casa Loma
Hockey Hall of Fame
Kensington Market
St. Lawrence Market
Bata Show Museum
Mink Mile
High Park
Scarborough Bluffs
Canada's Wonderland
LegoLand
Toronto Zoo
Aga Khan Museum
Black Creek Pioneer Village
Chinatown (spadina)
Greektown
Little Italy
Gardiner Museum
Woodbine Racetrack/Casino

Seasonal:
CNE
Taste of the Danforth
Caribana
Pride
TIFF
Wet&Wild

Lots of other festivals and smaller museums I've left off but you get the idea.
No shortage of things to do in Toronto.
Good list! Let's add to that…

Major League Sports Scene: there's usually some team playing
Food Scene: an unbelievably huge selection of restaurants representing countless cuisines
Live Theatre Scene: there's always stuff playing
Berczy Park
Rush Lane
West Queen West
Ossington
The Distillery
Yorkville
Spadina House adds a lot to a Casa Loma visit.
TIFF Bell Lightbox anytime during the year if you're a film buff, as there's always something interesting playing that many places won't get. Same with
Hot Docs Bloor Cinema for that kind of film buffery.
McMichael Canadian Collection

and soon, Little Canada.

I could find more if I didn't have other things to do. Any visit, you want to tailor plans to your visitors' interests.

If you can't keep a tourist busy here for days and days, you don't really know your city.

42
 

WislaHD

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Hmmm really? Just off the top of my head...

CN Tower
Ripley's Aquarium
Roundhouse Park/Train Museum
Hockey Hall of Fame

Tourists usually see all these places no matter what, as they are the "must-visits" and right next to each other. The synergy is great between them, and probably a big part of why Ripley's is as successful as it is.

ROM
AGO
Centre Island/Waterfront
Casa Loma
Bata Show Museum
Kensington Market
St. Lawrence Market

For sure!

Fort York
Science Centre
Toronto Zoo
Aga Khan Museum
Black Creek Pioneer Village
Scarborough Bluffs

Fort York is kinda boring, and not really something that would impress any European visitor, who are used to forts and castles dotting their landscape.

The others are regretfully out of the way, especially for a tourist that are transit-bound. Since I live in Midtown, I would definitely suggest Science Centre and Aga Khan to people I would host, but the typical tourist is stationed in downtown.

The opening of the Eglinton Crosstown will be a game-changer in this respect I guess.

Canada's Wonderland
LegoLand

Depends on the tourist in question, if they are into amusement parks or not, if they have kids or not, and usually how much time they have in the city. These are day-trips.

High Park
Chinatown (spadina)
Greektown
Little Italy

I am sure they have parks and neighbourhoods wherever they are coming from. Chinatown is worth visiting but can be seen as an extension of a Kensington Market outing. The Distillery District is also worth visiting as mentioned by i42.

However, the Toronto "city-of-neighbourhoods" moniker is really overrated. You can appreciate the distinctiveness of each neighbourhood from a livability perspective as locals, but those nuances between Ossington, Little Italy, or Leslieville are surely lost on the average tourist.

For me, a true city-of-neighbourhoods is somewhere like Lisbon, where the neighbourhoods are genuinely distinct in built-form, architecture, eras, and sub-cultures, and also have significant landmarks in each neighbourhood.

Gardiner Museum

I've never been.
Mink Mile
Woodbine Racetrack/Casino

Lol, no.

Though like it or not, the Eaton Centre is probably worth describing as an tourist attraction.

Seasonal:
CNE
Taste of the Danforth
Caribana
Pride
TIFF
Wet&Wild

Lots of other festivals and smaller museums I've left off but you get the idea.
No shortage of things to do in Toronto.

Anything seasonal + theatre + sports should go without saying. The attraction with all those events is that there is some activity to do + experience.

The problem as I see it is that there is a shortage of landmark attractions in Toronto. We certainly have lots of stuff to "do", but less stuff to "see", and the latter is important for sight-seeing tourism. On a day where one of those seasonal events are not happening or are unappealing to you (TIFF is not for everyone for instance), what can you go to "see"?

Yonge+Dundas Square certainly does not cut it. Honestly, neither does Nathan Phillips Square if it weren't for the Toronto Sign, City Hall, Osgoode Hall, and Old City Hall right there.

The Stackt Market is an example of something that while tacky, is a step in the right direction and would not mind seeing converted into something permanent. I have high hopes for The Well, Mirvish Village, and the BIG King Toronto projects as well. These three will provide more things to see and alongside the Stackt Market, will be very instagrammable (which like or not, is relevant for tourism in 2019). From a parks perspective, Ordnance Park will also be amazing for the views of downtown once opened.

Old City Hall should be converted into a Museum of Toronto after the court house relocates to the Ontario Court of Justice. City Hall should re-open their rooftop patio.

Finally, I cannot stress how much I want Ontario Place to be converted into a year-round, all-ages, tourist attraction.
 
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yyzhyd

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Well let's use a comparable city like Chicago where I used to live.
I know, I know, there's a ton of UT history re: Chicago v. Toronto comparisons... I'm not trying to start THAT debate again lol :)

Willis Tower
Navy Pier
Buckingham Fountain/Millenium Park/Grant Park
Field Museum
Art Institute
Shedd Aquarium
Mag Mile
Lincoln Park Zoo
Lakefront Trail
Adler Planetarium
Children's Museum
Water Tower
Calder's Flamingo (sculpture)
Wrigley Stadium
Chinatown
Little India
John Hancock Centre
Morton Arboretum
Six Flags
Bahai Temple


Seasonal
Air & Water Show
Taste of Chicago
Jazz Festival

Without a doubt the wealth and philanthropy of Chicago's resident's over a much longer period has resulted in higher quality and substance in many of their attractions. But let's not summarily dismiss what Toronto has to offer.

I have travelled to over 30 countries and I can honestly say that while Toronto definitely isn't the prettiest city (especially with all the overhead electrical) it is quite an amazing place despite the lack of vision from city halls across the GTA.
Tourists I have hosted mainly originating from Asia (which is the biggest growth demographic IIRC) absolutely love this city.
European tourists imo primarily come to Canada to visit the natural beauty of our great country and less to see the cities.
 

WislaHD

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It could be argued that we are one refurbished Ontario Place and Museum of Toronto away from matching Chicago's excellence in attractions. (Chicago is desperately on my to-travel list!)

However, 10 Dundas and Yonge+Dundas Square are not making my list of Toronto attractions, except in a city-walking tour accompanied with guided-explanation of past city policy and urban planning lessons. A good guide would include lamentations over the lost opportunity of this space.
 

Blixtein

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In 5-10 years Dundas Square will look like a total dump and will have to be revitalized again.
 

karledice

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The very last place I would ever send a tourist is Yonge-Dundas Square. Could not think of a more miserable and decrepit representation of this city than Yonge-Dundas. The square and intersection is where I would send someone if I really disliked them.

Agreed, it's a seedy, chaotic mess.
Most tourist spend their time further south anyways: CN Tower, Ripley, Chinatown etc.
 

Johnny Au

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Though like it or not, the Eaton Centre is probably worth describing as an tourist attraction.
There's an excellent reason why Eaton Centre is the most visited attraction in Toronto, local or tourist.

In fact, it is the busiest shopping mall in North America, beating out the likes of West Edmonton Mall and the Mall of America.
 

CityStay

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That is usually not an option to some. It is the best access point to the north-bound Dundas platform, Ryerson students heavily frequent the inside, and with Scotiabank shutting down, it will become the go-to cinema in the downtown area.



I have to imagine that part of Ripley's Aquarium's success is down to there not being much other attractions to visit in Toronto.

I honestly have no clue where tourists to this city go. When I am asked by visiting friends where to go, I do usually tell them Ripley's Aquarium because honestly what else is there to do aside from the ROM and AGO? Ripley's Aquarium is the top Toronto attraction according to TripAdvisor probably for the same reason.

The very last place I would ever send a tourist is Yonge-Dundas Square. Could not think of a more miserable and decrepit representation of this city than Yonge-Dundas. The square and intersection is where I would send someone if I really disliked them.

I had this problem with a friend from Berlin. He had a 36 hour layover on his way to Argentina and texted me to ask what to do. I didn't really know what to say, he's from Berlin. Nothing in Toronto was going to amaze him.

Told him to walk around, mentioned Kensington, AGO, ROM, Aquarium, CN Tower - all of which are available in Berlin times 10 - and told him NOT to go to Dundas Square. I mean, what else? I wasn't going to send him to that tacky, jumbled, pathetic mess of a 'square' and he's not a 'mall guy' so..

I think he walked around a bit, got kicked out of a bar at 2 and went back to his hostel. He was polite about it but I doubt he's in any hurry to come back.
 

condovo

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Out-of-towners who've visited me over the years have fallen in love with St. Lawrence Market, Kensington Market and Toronto Islands in particular. The museums here get a big "meh." On an international level, especially for a big city like Toronto, they just don't wow. The SuperBuild program from the early 2000s, which expanded a lot of our cultural institutions, ended much too soon.

The "City of Neighbourhoods" moniker is a dud. Every city is "city of neighbourhoods" and many more so than Toronto. Diversity? Every major city on the planet is diverse. The architecture here still isn't happening, though, hopefully, it's improving. Friends from places like São Paulo and London, UK, have asked me how come all the buildings look the same. This past July, a relative from Atlanta was surprised by how poorly the parks are maintained--people notice--but she was blown away biking on the Leslie Street Spit.

I'd say for sure that Toronto needs more attractions, especially cold-weather, indoor attractions. When relatives visited me from Boston last November, their second or third time here, after Anthropocene at the AGO and Manolo Blahnik at the Bata Shoe Museum, I honestly didn't know what to do with them. The Eaton Centre? They have better malls in Boston. Ripley's Aquarium? The New England Aquarium is better and it's not just a kitschy tourist attraction. It's involved in important research and conservation programs. They did like the Toronto sign.

To quote Steve Martin again, "Toronto is like New York, but without all the stuff." We need more stuff, a lot more stuff, better stuff, and winter stuff, ie, more indoor, non-mall stuff.
 
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Northern Light

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With great respect, some of you are both numb to what Toronto has to offer because your used to it; and many of you are also very well traveled (as am I) and therefore imagine every tourist being from NYC or London or such, rather than Buffalo or Manchester.

Obviously many of us are also archi-tourists thinking only in terms of particularly interesting buildings or piazzas; I would again suggest that this is not necessarily reflective of many tourist interests, nor would it necesarily be of interest to anyone who lived in a city with hundreds of great buildings of a particular vintage, and a dozen more more spectacular public squares.

I've had the pleasure of showing someone from Germany around before, and she was utterly taken by Toronto.

She first remarked on our architectural diversity. Amusing to locals, I know, but to her, she was used to mostly low and midrise buildings of only 2 or 3 vintages.

To her seeing Fort Book, Victorian Homes, Commerce Court North and the CN Tower was entirely exotic; and of course Nathan Phillips Square cause she saw it on Star Trek TNG, LOL

As noted by Condvo, St. Lawrence Market is often a hit, having been rated the world's best such market by National Geographic.

She was even more enthralled by the ravines and the vastness of Lake Ontario; and Rouge Park; she spent 2 days criss-crossing every bike path in the City she could manage in the time available.

The ROM's aboriginal/first nations section was something she hadn't really seen the likes of and quite enjoyed; and lets not forget the roller coasters of Canada's Wonderland, among the world's very best selections.

Toronto has much to work on; its public realm is improving but has a very long way to go; our modern architecture is ....uneven and often (but not always) uninspired.

But its musical theatre scene is second-largest on the this continent and third largest in the English speaking world.

You can all stop reducing Toronto to Ripley's or TEC, not that either are bad for what they are; but because our City is so much more; even if it can and should be better still.

Mindless boosterism is obnoxious; but I'm not such a fan of mindless self-flagellation either.
 
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