What do you think of this project?

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  • Total voters
    47
Fair enough, I think I read into your post the idea of replacing the Save On with a Dollar Store. Which I think was my inference not your implication. My apologies. I don't think one of the super big Dollarama's would be the right fit but a smaller one as a compliment could be.

I remember that dollar store, it was not doing well. Most of the local community stayed away from it so they only got business from the transient folks moving through the area. The Thai massage place that replaced it is doing well enough to have expanded to an additional space across 82nd ave.
All good! Like I said... unpopular opinion lol

I lived in Virginia Park for over 20 years, the dollar store did OK for the first maybe 8-10 years but at some point changed to a different brand that was far more about cheesy gifts and even worse-than-normal dollar store junk that failed pretty quick. Not to sound like some sort of guerilla Dollarama marketing shill (I only make $0.15 a post) but they do offer a decent selection of cheaper household essentials and supplies, plus a nice assortment of junk and junk food, that is a lot different than those dollar stores previously occupied.

Sometimes when you're out to grab just some quick items on the way home, they are pretty affordable and convenient. Buying parchment paper, dish soap and tupperware for $7 makes a lot more sense than spending quite literally 3x that at Save-On. But it sure won't replace the biweekly big $200 grocery trip to Save-On.
 
Italian Centre is also not that far from the Stadium Yards area. I couldn't see another grocer moving in unless all of the vacant development parcels are developed with high density residential. The Save-On at 82 Street is not super busy and could use more customers, so it's not like there's a lack of grocery supply in the area currently.

It's about a 20 minute walk from Stadium Yards to the Italian Centre.
 
I would rather shop at a grocery store in my own neighborhood than take an LRT train to do grocery shopping. That's the purpose of a 15-minute city, yes?
With Stadium Yards, there is just a rundown Save-On Foods at 82 St/112 Ave. Another grocery store at Jasper Ave near 84 St will be much closer and will help lure more people into purchasing/renting a unit at Stadium Yards.
A 15 min means to have your services within 15 min. That would include where the train can get you in 15 min. Some hardliners limit it walk/bike but more liberal concepts factor in bus and car.

The key idea is a multi nodal city, not one with a singular “core”.

Also I dont think you are factoring in the logistics of putting a major grocery store in the middle of residential, the trucks, the traffic, the garbage.

To further point out the obvious
IMG_5725.png
 
Also I dont think you are factoring in the logistics of putting a major grocery store in the middle of residential, the trucks, the traffic, the garbage.

Actually, that has not escaped my notice. They can build an underground parkade underneath the grocery store that will be free to shoppers for 2 hours, similar to Loblaws Urban Markets in ICE District and the Brewery District. This parkade and grocery store can serve as the podium of a medium-rise apartment building that can serve as an extension of Stadium Yards.
 
Also I dont think you are factoring in the logistics of putting a major grocery store in the middle of residential, the trucks, the traffic, the garbage.
Safeway in Oliver (Jasper Ave and 122 st) and Loblaws in the ICE District send you their regards. Both in denser, busier and more complex places to operate an urban grocery store.

You are a curious person... will go out of line too defend a fairly radical transit prioritization, and breaking with the status quo, but here you are defending the status quo of big box grocery stores.
 
Safeway in Oliver (Jasper Ave and 122 st) and Loblaws in the ICE District send you their regards. Both in denser, busier and more complex places to operate an urban grocery store.

You are a curious person... will go out of line too defend a fairly radical transit prioritization, and breaking with the status quo, but here you are defending the status quo of big box grocery stores.
just pointing out realities. we have a long history of urban formats failing here. I want them to succeed but i dont see how that happens at this particular site with a save on, right there.

Maybe a urban drugstore, open late with some food offerings. some sort of entertainment destination.

im not going to waste a wish on a grocery store.
 
just pointing out realities. we have a long history of urban formats failing here. I want them to succeed but i dont see how that happens at this particular site with a save on, right there.

Maybe a urban drugstore, open late with some food offerings. some sort of entertainment destination.

im not going to waste a wish on a grocery store.
Long history? Are you talking about one sobeys location from 10 years ago? What other urban formats have failed?
 
Long history? Are you talking about one sobeys location from 10 years ago? What other urban formats have failed?
The only two that come to mind are that Sobeys (chronically afflicted by bad product selection, no parking whatsoever, weird-ass layout) and the incredibly overpriced and niche Planet Organic, that was where Safeway is now in Oliver (and only actually closed because the whole chain went down)
 
Long history? Are you talking about one sobeys location from 10 years ago? What other urban formats have failed?
Planet Organic, Earths general, Family Foods, and however many other names it had, as well as one that went belly up in the 90’s Denalli’s or something. The name is escaping me. It was more akin to city market and was located on 109st near 76th.

Why am I so conservative on these formats, because I want them to be successful. Every time one is tried and fails it supports the case that the format is the issue, when really it was more a case of putting the cart before the horse.
 
Also I dont think you are factoring in the logistics of putting a major grocery store in the middle of residential, the trucks, the traffic, the garbage.

Having grocery stores in residential areas is extremely common in basically every part of the world. The logistics seem difficult because North American companies are now used to using massive site, loading bays and trucks, but if we started building more urban/smaller grocers they would figure our the logistics.
 
Having grocery stores in residential areas is extremely common in basically every part of the world. The logistics seem difficult because North American companies are now used to using massive site, loading bays and trucks, but if we started building more urban/smaller grocers they would figure our the logistics.
Are they normally in the centre of, or the edge of?

I think you will find that very few are found at a community’s heart. Those spaces are normally reserved for schools and parks instead of driving a bunch of traffic through the community we make it accessibility along our transport corridors. Like the Save on food by the stadium is, even city market is found on the edge of Oliver.

This is the part of my pov that is being overlooked.
 
Lets zoom out to 10,000 feet and recognize that this area has an existing store and advocating for another while there are actual food deserts just down the road.

IMG_5732.jpeg
 
why are people so tied to the idea of the mega grocery store? The good folks in Manhattan get by with only 1 (one!) suburban format store (if it's even still there). The rest are neighbourhood block level bodegas and mid-sized stores like Gristeddes and D'agostinos. If you look at the Jasper Ave. Safeway, and take away the instore bakery and meat depts., squish down the self space, you'd have a store that fulfils 95% of the local's needs with a substanially smaller footprint.
 
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why are people so tied to the idea of the mega grocery store? The good folks in Manhattan get by with only 1 (one!) suburban format store (if it's even still there). The rest are neighbourhood block level bodegas.

In Manhattan the local Bodega is often your fridge as well as kitchen. Manhattan specifically is a very different type of existence.

 
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