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nfitz

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I know diddly-squat about major public works contracts, but that sounds like a really smart idea to me. I know that Waterloo Region's ION was once described as a public utilities project with a railway on top.
It increases costs. And in the event of significant extra costs where they can't break-even, they always manage to get extras anyhow.

Little public benefit.
 

jcam

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It increases costs. And in the event of significant extra costs where they can't break-even, they always manage to get extras anyhow.

Little public benefit.
IF it works as its supposed to, Alliance is a smart way to go, and shouldn't increase costs. Take it this way. The project might have always been a $75M project, but the owner estimated the cost at $60M and traditional DBB bids were awarded in that range. Changes, claims, etc., get the project up to $75M. If they instead try to force all the risks to the contractor, their bids might actually be closer to $75M (baking in the unknown risk), but the claims take it over that. In an Alliance, the contractor is helping you set the budget and any changes in assumptions are transparently available to both parties...so maybe you come in at $68M. So its higher than what might have been a low/inaccurate estimate, but its lower than it 'should' have been because you've got early contractor involvement and can squeeze out efficiencies and do better planning.
 

mdrejhon

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As part of the renewal, it was mentioned that the sewers will also be enlarged (possibly provisions for separated sewer for all condo newbuilds along corridor — currently Hamilton is combined).

I think the utilities upgrades are well worth it long-term.

It was already known by me since 2015 that a large part of LRT fund was the utilities redo cost.
 

Allandale25

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I hope Bob does not win.

Bratina, on the other hand, announced last May he wouldn’t seek federal re-election because of the Liberal government’s decision to contribute $1.7 billion to help reboot the once-cancelled light-rail initiative.

“Well, the LRT discussion is in the hands of city council, and, as the mayor under our system, I have one vote,” he told Radley during Monday’s broadcast.

But he added, “we need to look at a Plan B in case” pressures like inflation and rising interest rates “force the government to make other decisions.”

 

Amare

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I hope Bob does not win.



Oh for the love of God, i'll be blunt here, cant he screw off and just retire into the sunset. Is the pension money he's getting as a former MP not good enough for him? Is his ego not bloated enough from being mayor in the past?

What does the "instability” that Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has caused, including soaring gas prices" have to do about running for mayor in Hamilton?

This guy is more deluded the Doug + Rob Ford combined, and unfortunately it seems like Hamilton is going to be stuck yet again between choosing him or Eisenburger (who i'm sure will run yet again).
 

Allandale25

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The City of Hamilton LRT Sub-committee is meeting on May 16th. Agenda hasn't been posted yet.

Light Rail Transit Sub-committee

Monday, May 16, 2022 @ 10:30 AM
YouTube Channel Streaming for Virtual Meetings (due to COVID)


In advance a local advocacy group is posting this:

 

SaugeenJunction

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Full report that was presented to committee direct linked here.

One of the infrastructure quirks I love about this project is the CP Rail spur underpass. I specifically love how the LRT goes under the freight spur, while the road stays at the surface. It makes complete sense to avoid transit delays.

9744B9B9-0F5D-4200-891D-A64D712B8991.jpeg
 

allengeorge

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I do like the idea of separating the two infrastructure components. It would seem to me that there would be a lot more expertise and bidders for the city component, so, maybe we could get a slightly better overall outcome.

Has this been done with previous transit projects?
 

innsertnamehere

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Full report that was presented to committee direct linked here.

One of the infrastructure quirks I love about this project is the CP Rail spur underpass. I specifically love how the LRT goes under the freight spur, while the road stays at the surface. It makes complete sense to avoid transit delays.
That spur sees like 1-2 trains a day, and they are usually small trains only a couple cars long that pass quickly. That underpass is actually quite pricey for the minimal delay it saves, IMO. I believe the reason it's required is because light rail vehicles aren't safety rated to cross heavy freight tracks at grade. It's an odd quirk of railway regulations forcing a $200+m underpass that really isn't needed. The money would be better spent elsewhere to improve travel times, like perhaps building the now cancelled West Harbour LRT connection.
 

Bureaucromancer

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That spur sees like 1-2 trains a day, and they are usually small trains only a couple cars long that pass quickly. That underpass is actually quite pricey for the minimal delay it saves, IMO. I believe the reason it's required is because light rail vehicles aren't safety rated to cross heavy freight tracks at grade. It's an odd quirk of railway regulations forcing a $200+m underpass that really isn't needed. The money would be better spent elsewhere to improve travel times, like perhaps building the now cancelled West Harbour LRT connection.
At 200 million, even if they ended have to have someone flag every lrv across a level crossing it’s a LONG period of operation before this grade separation makes any sense.
 

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