News   GLOBAL  |  Apr 02, 2020
 5.6K     0 
News   GLOBAL  |  Apr 01, 2020
 28K     0 
News   GLOBAL  |  Apr 01, 2020
 2.7K     0 

dullturtle06

New Member
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 2, 2021
Messages
69
Reaction score
164
Like if not for the concrete it would look very nice. They should have used something like this instead. Harder to tag, better view from the street for safety, and looks so much better. Probably would cost less too.
1619919461679.png
 

Tuck

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Mar 7, 2016
Messages
291
Reaction score
394
It's fine I guess. Thing already has tags and will probably be covered in graffiti in a few months.

I still think it's regrettable that it has stairs at both ends rather than a ramp, though maybe it was too high on the north side for a ramp. The thing just feels over engineered.

Still, it's decently convenient.
 

WestEnd

New Member
Member Bio
Joined
Mar 1, 2017
Messages
99
Reaction score
749
I believe murals only come after... you know, after the tags and grotesqueness. Metrolinx/CN/Railpeople(?) wanted the walkway quite high as these are live tracks -I know it's a pain with the stairs, especially with that gorgeous stainless steel bridge down the tracks (where the tracks are much lower than street level), but this does the job assuming the the elevator gets finished and everyone can enjoy. People, this has opened up a new part of the city to many... Liberty Village!

StreetArtToronto:

 

cereal

New Member
Member Bio
Joined
Feb 5, 2013
Messages
24
Reaction score
38
I just can't believe how terrible the design is. The stairwell entrances on both sides are so uninviting and unintuitive to find, they are almost purposefully hidden from anyone approaching from the street. Why are are both entrances not outward facing? It feels like you are going through a temporary service entrance. It does not feel safe at all after dark, there are no sightlines into the entrances and stairwells from the street. I struggle to understand how something like this gets approved and built.
 

ARG1

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
May 28, 2020
Messages
1,913
Reaction score
4,674
City:
Toronto
I just can't believe how terrible the design is. The stairwell entrances on both sides are so uninviting and unintuitive to find, they are almost purposefully hidden from anyone approaching from the street. Why are are both entrances not outward facing? It feels like you are going through a temporary service entrance. It does not feel safe at all after dark, there are no sightlines into the entrances and stairwells from the street. I struggle to understand how something like this gets approved and built.
It feels somewhat similar to the pedestrian bridge between Richmond Hill Centre and Langstaff GO.
1621608607339.png

Its not that bad, and it will probably get the job done.
 

Towered

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 24, 2007
Messages
7,349
Reaction score
7,050
Checked this out in person the other day for the first time. Agreed with the other comments here - it feels bare-bones and cheap, even incomplete (classic Toronto, really). The design of the stairs is horrible, and possibly even unsafe at night, as others have mentioned. The lack of runnels is face-palm inducing (I saw an unfortunate woman huffing and puffing while struggling to carry her bike up the 3 flights of stairs) and, as expected, the elevator is out of service months after opening. Still, I witnessed a steady stream of people crossing in the brief time I was there, so it is providing a useful link. Also, I was pleasantly surprised (shocked, actually) to see that the red brick portion is actually glazed. I don't recall any projects in recent decades utilizing glazed brick!
 

max

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Mar 7, 2018
Messages
194
Reaction score
374
City:
Toronto
Checked this out in person the other day for the first time. Agreed with the other comments here - it feels bare-bones and cheap, even incomplete (classic Toronto, really). The design of the stairs is horrible, and possibly even unsafe at night, as others have mentioned. The lack of runnels is face-palm inducing (I saw an unfortunate woman huffing and puffing while struggling to carry her bike up the 3 flights of stairs) and, as expected, the elevator is out of service months after opening. Still, I witnessed a steady stream of people crossing in the brief time I was there, so it is providing a useful link. Also, I was pleasantly surprised (shocked, actually) to see that the red brick portion is actually glazed. I don't recall any projects in recent decades utilizing glazed brick!
The elevators was never in service. There were safety and accessibility compliance issues that prevented the bridge from opening as reported by @huskywhale here. After that was clear, a deliberate decision to open the bridge without the elevators.
 

W. K. Lis

Superstar
Member Bio
Joined
Dec 24, 2007
Messages
21,998
Reaction score
12,117
City:
Toronto
The elevators was never in service. There were safety and accessibility compliance issues that prevented the bridge from opening as reported by @huskywhale here. After that was clear, a deliberate decision to open the bridge without the elevators.
They should open the alternate elevator. Oh wait, they didn't put one in. Smart (not).
 

crs1026

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Oct 17, 2014
Messages
7,912
Reaction score
13,049
^What contingencies does the city have (beyond calling the fire department) in the event of elevator failure, I wonder? Especially nights/weekends.

Edmonton’s funicular is a cautionary tale - high volume of closure and out of service events.

Between deliberate vandalism, user error, and climate, elevators can be high maintenance items.

- Paul.
 

Top