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zang

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Try telling the next cop you see you pay their salary and you're their boss.
I'm not on city council, so you're moving the goalposts here.

Not sure you know what that word means.
Intentional shit disturbing, if you will, using false equivalencies, feigned outrage or bad faith.

If it was intended as such it should have been done so.
And if it were a parking lot, it'd have lines and an entry lane, so same applies to the cops, right?

Just because it's a patch of concrete doesn't mean they get to do whatever they want with it. You also keep ignoring that city council has repeatedly told them to stop using it. It's city land, they have that right. Stop pretending there's any kind of argument that works in the cops' favour. It doesn't. They're not supposed to use it, have been told not to and keep using it *for their own personal cars*.
 

picard102

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Intentional shit disturbing, if you will, using false equivalencies, feigned outrage or bad faith.
Not agreeing with your assessment is none of those. But feel free to not respond if you feel it's trolling, you're not going to change my mind that it is in fact not a public square.
 

zang

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Not agreeing with your assessment is none of those. But feel free to not respond if you feel it's trolling, you're not going to change my mind that it is in fact not a public square.
Arguing it’s an acceptable auxiliary parking lot isn’t the same as disagreeing it’s a public space (despite city council saying otherwise).
 

Northern Light

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Just to note here, 52 Division was set back that far from Dundas as part of a 70s era plan to create a super-wide sidewalk on the south side of Dundas from University to the Art Gallery (there was contemplation of this being extended east to Yonge, which is how we got the wide sidewalks next to the Eaton Centre.)

The original concept called for a double-row of trees.

It might be useful at this juncture to simply appropriate the requisite space from the front of 52 Division and create that double-row of trees and wide, streetscaped sidewalk, and organize it such that parking cars on the remaining space is just about impossible.
 
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picard102

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Arguing it’s an acceptable auxiliary parking lot isn’t the same as disagreeing it’s a public space (despite city council saying otherwise).
Then you've been arguing with yourself.
No where did I say they should park there, in fact I said they should apply to build a parking structure there if they wanted to use it as such.
 

W. K. Lis

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City:
Toronto

To Fix the Housing Affordability Crisis, Ontario Should End Exclusionary Single-Family Zoning in High-Demand Areas

From link.

The Government of Ontario needs to fix outdated zoning laws to allow conversion of detached properties into much-needed ‘missing middle’ townhomes
Ontario REALTORS® are calling on the Government of Ontario to cut red tape and build on the successful More Homes, More Choice Act, 2019 by ending Ontario’s exclusionary single-family zoning rules in high-demand areas.

Currently, it is illegal in Toronto neighborhoods to convert a single-family home into a townhome, duplex, triplex or fourplex without a zoning by-law change, which delays projects, costs additional money, and leaves people stranded without an affordable home. These outdated zoning laws encourage NIMBY forces to drive up costs of homes or drive away affordable homes in a neighbourhood entirely.

“In too many Ontario cities, it defies common sense that you can take a bungalow and turn it into a monster four-storey home for one wealthy family, but you cannot build affordable townhomes for multiple families without red tape, runaround, and exorbitant costs,” said OREA CEO Tim Hudak. “Exclusionary zoning policies are at the heart of Ontario’s housing affordability crisis in high-growth areas and it’s time the Province steps in to modernize these archaic laws.”

Specifically, OREA is encouraging the Province to use the Planning Act to implement as-of-right zoning in Ontario’s highest-demand urban neighbourhoods. This change would allow the seamless and legal development of gentle density, including duplexes, triplexes, and fourplexes, next door to existing density and close to subway and transit stations without unnecessary and lengthy case-by-case approvals.

“You cannot grow south into Lake Ontario or north into the Greenbelt, so we need to use the space in between to create more homes and give more choice to Ontarians,” said Hudak. “High home prices are evidence enough that there are not enough homes to accommodate growing families across the province. But archaic rules and regulations are holding up new developments and exacerbating the problem – keeping the Canadian dream of home ownership out of reach for millennials and young families.”

According to recent OREA research conducted by Abacus Data, almost 7 in 10 Ontarians say housing affordability should be a top priority for the government. The report also found that 78% of Ontarians support minimum zoning in urban areas to encourage more homes.

OREA’s recommendations to implement as-of-right zoning is part of the Association’s plan to bring housing affordability home for young families in Ontario. OREA’s plan also proposes to reduce costs for first time home buyers, reduce approval times for builders, and permit innovative housing solutions.

“On the heels of a federal election focused on housing affordability, this issue remains top of mind for many who badly want all levels of government to help bring affordability home – and that starts with increasing and improving housing supply,” said Hudak.

Ontario REALTORS® have a plan to solve the affordability crisis. You can read our plan and take action by visiting bringaffordabilityhome.com
John Tory and city council should start the ball rolling.
 

zang

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Then you've been arguing with yourself.
No where did I say they should park there, in fact I said they should apply to build a parking structure there if they wanted to use it as such.
Uhhuh:
"the area in front of 52 Division on Dundas Street West is wholly within the property limits and there is no public right of way other than the City sidewalk involved"
It's funny to see people tripping over themselves to complain about something so assine as to park on a slab of concrete due to construction.
 

picard102

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So you've quoted me where I quote from the city report that it's not a public square, and that I think people complaining about this are doing so because they have an axe to grind...

Again, you're having an argument with me in your head that isn't present in these quotes.

To be clear in case it's still confusing, this "plaza" is not a public space, the public's right to access it stops at the sidewalk. If the police want to use it for parking they should apply to do so.
I also can believe at the same time that complaining about it is silly.
 
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Towered

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afransen

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The fact that the real estate trade body and former Conservative leader is saying this gives a faint glimmer of hope that this idea might penetrate into provincial policy.
 

Northern Light

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To Fix the Housing Affordability Crisis, Ontario Should End Exclusionary Single-Family Zoning in High-Demand Areas

From link.

The Government of Ontario needs to fix outdated zoning laws to allow conversion of detached properties into much-needed ‘missing middle’ townhomes

John Tory and city council should start the ball rolling.

From the above link:

1633616631471.png


So the request is for as-of-right for everything up to a four-plex.

A reasonable request, as far as it goes.

But they seem to be suggesting it only for MTSAs.

I'd like to see that province-wide, period.

Then we can get more ambitious and talk about as-of-right permission for at least 4s, and multi-res, on every single collector/arterial road in the GTA.
 

Jonny5

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It would be nice if we could have some by-law reform on residential rentals and heating and cooling. I know Matlow has been on this for years but he has gotten nowhere with it. This wave of heat has been rough since it is oddly as hot at night as it is in the daytime and is causing my unit to bake. Thermostat said it was 27°C this morning, which makes sense for a highly energy efficient insulated 2010's building. It's not leaking heat like a 1960's slab tower does. The city by-law that says you have to keep a minimum temperature of 21°C after September 15, and that needs to be revisited badly. It's possible to go down well below that temperature for a few days triggering activation of heating and deactivation of air conditioning, but then for the temperature to go way back up, but modern centralised large building heating and cooling systems can't be switched back and forth with ease, it takes several days to change those, and the technicians who do it are booked weeks in advance. The City should add a transition period from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15 where the temperature can dip down lower than 21°C for a few hours per day (presumably these are at night), and then buildings can keep at least keep the air conditioning available and the heat off for that period. It would at least help them stop guessing what the weather will be in October on September 15.
 
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zang

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It would be nice if we could have some by-law reform on residential rentals and heating and cooling. I know Matlow has been on this for years but he has gotten nowhere with it. This wave of heat has been rough since it is oddly as hot at night as it is in the daytime and is causing my unit to bake. Thermostat said it was 27°C this morning, which makes sense for a highly energy efficient insulated 2010's building. It's not leaking heat like a 1960's slab tower does. The city by-law that says you have to keep a minimum temperature of 21°C after September 15 needs to be revisited badly. It's possible to go down well below that temperature for a few days triggering activation of heating and deactivation of air conditioning, but then for the temperature to go way back up, but modern centralised large building heating and cooling systems can't be switched back and forth with ease, it takes several days to change those, and the technicians who do it are booked weeks in advance. The City should add a transition period from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15 where the temperature can dip down lower than 21°C for a few hours per day (presumably these are at night), and then buildings can keep at least keep the air conditioning available and the heat off for that period.
Got a similar problem here. Our building replaced the windows a few years back. They were once fully-opening side-slider windows probably as old as the building (40 yrs), then the landlord installed high-efficiency windows with one quarter pane that cranks open about six inches. Needless to say, temperature regulation has been a big pain in the ass since. It's turned all the apartments into greenhouses. We don't often peak above 27°C in our unit (it's 26.2° inside right now at 9:42AM; 17.0°C outside) on the 19th floor, but the top floors with less shading from neighbours have seen 30°C on fall days; much hotter than the temperature outside. The landlord has already refused to turn the AC back on, because there's zero legal obligation. They acted like they were doing us a favour installing these windows (along with an AGI on rent), as well as any time they decide to turn the AC on a few days early in the spring. Interior temperatures have never dipped below 19°C during the early fall or late spring even with the the heat off.
 

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