News   GLOBAL  |  Apr 02, 2020
 4.7K     0 
News   GLOBAL  |  Apr 01, 2020
 12K     0 
News   GLOBAL  |  Apr 01, 2020
 2.2K     0 

nfitz

Superstar
Member Bio
Joined
Nov 10, 2007
Messages
24,374
Reaction score
4,722
City:
Toronto
Remind me when any of those hired Jayson Blair. Or blew through umpteen million on a new headquarters just as print fell into the toilet. Or had Judith Miller pitching for an illegal war under the guise of far and objective journalism.
All valid complaints. But I think you mistake a grudge for illiteracy.

I wouldn't wipe my ass with that rag.
I find frequent use of newsprint, tends to lead to chafing, no matter how well written it is.
 

Toronto2gta

Banned
Member Bio
Joined
Mar 5, 2014
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Toronto is a beautiful city filled with decent hard working people. I feel proud to be a Torontonian and honored that we are getting the recognition we deserve.
 

jml

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Feb 7, 2014
Messages
532
Reaction score
0
The New York Times is a barely literate joke and the writer is a typically American moron who equates ethnic culture with food.

This seems like a (to say the least) overly vitriolic and personal reaction to an article about how much somebody likes the food here.
 

OttoSchloss

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Jan 27, 2009
Messages
396
Reaction score
3
I'm not sure anyone could argue with the content of the article. It's great publicity and great for tourism. The NYT is one of the most read dailies in the world. And it was a love letter to our city. It was great.
 

Ladies Mile

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Jun 17, 2009
Messages
310
Reaction score
1
This seems like a (to say the least) overly vitriolic and personal reaction to an article about how much somebody likes the food here.

I am tired of seeing the multicultural fabric we have created, however accidentally, reduced to "things to consume." If I never ate another plate of fill-in-the-blank-with-exotic-ethnic-delicacy ever again I'd be just as happy. The real value comes from ways to subtly respond to and sympathize with multiple points of view. The American way is BUY GRAB GET SELL. Not relevant. Not needed. Not welcome. And to be treated with the contempt it deserves.
 

newearthling

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Jun 2, 2013
Messages
1,834
Reaction score
0
Ladies Mile, you are one of the reasons I love UT! And I love everyone else who commented too. :) The exchange of ideas and differing opinions is great.
 

newearthling

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Jun 2, 2013
Messages
1,834
Reaction score
0
And, having lived in Vancouver while women started disappearing from the downtown eastside, and hearing rumours that cops knew Picton did it long before there was an investigation, you don't know Vancouverites well if you think they would be in a forgiving mood yet. Ontarians still hate Katla Homolka with a passion. If it's one thing Canadians do well, it's hold grudges and remember past grievances. Serial killer publicity would maybe fly in the states, but not here.
 

atodaso

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Nov 1, 2013
Messages
384
Reaction score
0
I am tired of seeing the multicultural fabric we have created, however accidentally, reduced to "things to consume." If I never ate another plate of fill-in-the-blank-with-exotic-ethnic-delicacy ever again I'd be just as happy. The real value comes from ways to subtly respond to and sympathize with multiple points of view. The American way is BUY GRAB GET SELL. Not relevant. Not needed. Not welcome. And to be treated with the contempt it deserves.

As a foreigner if you were invited into the home of a French, Italian, Moroccan - almost anywhere (except perhaps Britain), how do you imagine that family would welcome you to share their culture? Most likely it would be sharing the food and drink that is traditional to that region. Sounds good to me!

And painting all Americans as "BUY GRAB SELL" is just plain wrong. First, it ignores Canadians (especially Torontonians) propensity for the same. I've felt more genuinely welcomed in the places I've lived in the US than I do in Toronto. The primary form of social interaction in this town is 'going for drinks', which is often tied into networking. Even dating in this city seems to be mixed up in business transactions - and I don't mean prostitution. I mean going out on a date with someone whom your interested in only to have them turn it into a business meeting - to work in a proposal to represent you in a real estate transaction. Tacky as hell. Happened to me last month and she's probably still wondering why I haven't replied.
 

Top