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radioheadmike

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I own a large one bedroom hard loft - about 870sqft , high ceilings - about 11 feet.

I can potentially divide the living room to make an additional bedroom 7x11 with a loft space above the room (clears about 4 feet)

My question is from a resale point of view, is it worth adding the additional bedroom or should I leave the space open?
 

lenaitch

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I'm not generally a fan of open concept. I like being able to, for example, watch TV while the missus can read in another room and not be disturbed (or not feeling like she banished to the bedroom or something. However, having said that, you're dealing with a pretty small footprint, and cutting it up might make both resulting spaces seem too small. I have no luck with drawings or floor plans - I need a sense of what a space will feel like. If you have access to some 3D design software that might help. Our S-in-L recently did that for his elderly parents and their condo design and it really helped them.

I am the last person to offer interior design advice, but some things you might want to consider are:
-you say you own it - it is freehold or condo? If you are part of a condo corp., what are the extend of changes you can legally make?
-building code. Is a loft with a 4' ceiling - and assuming ladder access - even allowed? If you are thinking of doing a reno without a permit, don't.
-still in the vein of building codes, factor in changes to electrical and HVAC (assuming plumbing not involved). If said loft is, in fact, permitted, it becomes a room and subject to the same rules.
-regarding HVAC, consider how cutting up the space will impact air flow, seasonal solar room heating/cooling, etc.
-expect a tax re-assessment.
-if your unit is like the example provided, the large window would span both rooms. Bad idea and probably not allowed.

I'm sure there are other considerations but these are the ones that pop into mind at the moment.
 

radioheadmike

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I do own the unit and it is a condo. However, the board is pretty flexible and this addition will not require any changes to the existing structure - two interior walls added.
Majority of the units in my build have loft spaces with ladder access - shouldn't be an issue
HVAC duct will be extended to the new room - requires very little effort and the main room will have existing ducts
The walls will not touch the window - there will be a gap - technically the room will be more of a den - with a very large sliding barn doo
With the partition, the living space is still fairly large and will not feel tight
 

lenaitch

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I do own the unit and it is a condo. However, the board is pretty flexible and this addition will not require any changes to the existing structure - two interior walls added.
Majority of the units in my build have loft spaces with ladder access - shouldn't be an issue
HVAC duct will be extended to the new room - requires very little effort and the main room will have existing ducts
The walls will not touch the window - there will be a gap - technically the room will be more of a den - with a very large sliding barn doo
With the partition, the living space is still fairly large and will not feel tight

An agreeable Board is a good thing - get them to sign your drawings. Not wanting to sound like the fun police but even though your Board may be onside, all or part of your proposal sound like permits may be required. For example, you are creating a room with two walls, and there are electrical code rules for the number of receptacles required in linear wall distances. According to the Board, how much can you do yourself and what areas must be done by a licenced trade? Electrical work is often something Boards frown on being DIY, both for the obvious safety concerns but because it is connected to a common element. Trying to sell a condo unit that doesn't match the registered plan (without an attached closed building permit) might become problematic. Having said that, the way the real estate market is in the GTA, so long as a property isn't actively in flame during a showing, it seems that few things become show stoppers.
 

lenaitch

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At a follow-up post, you say your have 11' ceilings. Given that the Code minimum ceiling height for rooms is roughly 7'6", add roughly 9" (assuming 2x8 joists) you are left with roughly 2'9" loft height. In addition to likely being 'unapprovable', it becomes a pretty useless space. You would also need to consider a railing system to keep people from rolling over the edge. This is all in addition to things like how these walls would be attached to the surrounding structure.

Just because the Board is okay with it doesn't exempt you from applicable building codes.

Your original post asks for views from a resale perspective, personally, if I saw something like that my first reaction would be to run. If I didn't follow that instinct, my subsequent reaction would be to have my real estate lawyer do a comprehensive title search (to determine that any renos were legal) rather than just throw the dice with title insurance.
 

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