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A Torontonian Now

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C'mon, guys. The doctor said very clearly - and other doctors have already confirmed - that there are no lifestyle risk factors with this kind of cancer.

I wouldn't go that far. The doctor said there were no known lifestyle risks correlated with it. But in such a rare cancer, there is likely very limited opportunity to study such correlation. Just because it isn't known doesn't mean there isn't one.

That said, I wouldn't speculate that there are lifestyle risks for it either. I just think that it's clear that we don't know either way.
 

PinkLucy

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I wouldn't go that far. The doctor said there were no known lifestyle risks correlated with it. But in such a rare cancer, there is likely very limited opportunity to study such correlation. Just because it isn't known doesn't mean there isn't one.

That said, I wouldn't speculate that there are lifestyle risks for it either. I just think that it's clear that we don't know either way.
The doc on CBC was going down the obesity road. Granted, she's not a specialist for this type of cancer, but given that it's so rare, who is? Go figure that Rob is the one in a gazillion (not accurate figures) who gets this. Granted, if there were a direct correlation to lifestyle/weight, you'd think it wouldn't be quite so rare. And like any health issue, taking better care of yourself and losing some weight is never a bad thing.
 

whatthe

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I wouldn't go that far. The doctor said there were no known lifestyle risks correlated with it. But in such a rare cancer, there is likely very limited opportunity to study such correlation. Just because it isn't known doesn't mean there isn't one.

That said, I wouldn't speculate that there are lifestyle risks for it either. I just think that it's clear that we don't know either way.

Agreed. Which is why I think calling it fat ass cancer is inappropriate.
 

jusbokeh

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The doc on CBC was going down the obesity road. Granted, she's not a specialist for this type of cancer, but given that it's so rare, who is? Go figure that Rob is the one in a gazillion (not accurate figures) who gets this. Granted, if there were a direct correlation to lifestyle/weight, you'd think it wouldn't be quite so rare. And like any health issue, taking better care of yourself and losing some weight is never a bad thing.

do the math if 30% of our population is overweight or obese and this cancer only account for 1% of cancer types.

clearly obesity/lifestyle is not a factor.
 

whatthe

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60%, while not great is still pretty decent odds.

AoD

One article I saw quoted (sorry, in the twitterstorm I'm not sure where) said a 39% survival rate for his particular type. And it's apparently worse in the abdomen than in the limbs, which is the other place it's usually found.
 

AlvinofDiaspar

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do the math if 30% of our population is overweight or obese and this cancer only account for 1% of cancer types.

clearly obesity/lifestyle is not a factor.

Wrong - a common risk factor can increase the relative chance of a rare illness. It's all abut comparison with the control.

AoD
 

Oriana

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From what I've been reading, if that particular type of cancer is metastatic, survival rates drop considerably.
 

dforthandbview

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Any evidence of Rob saying he had a tumour on appendix?
He rushed down to the ER at Humber River Regional Hospital, where doctors did an ultrasound. Mr. Ford says he was originally told his small intestine was twisted with his large intestine and the kinks would work themselves out, but after 12 hours and no change the doctors took a closer look. They discovered Mr. Ford had a tumour on his appendix, which was infected, and the whole works had to come out right away.

"It really freaked me out when they said tumour," Mr. Ford said today from the hospital, after pausing briefly to chat with one of the hospital's nurses.

Doctors removed Mr. Ford's appendix and part of his colon where the tumour had spread, but Mr. Ford said surgeons were able to remove all of the tumour.


http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news...es-rob-fords-2009-health-scare/article787746/
 

whatthe

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Any evidence of Rob saying he had a tumour on appendix?

The first I'd ever heard of that was from this Dr last week. I've never heard that from Ford himself.

Edit: I see that Globe article now - oh dear! Sounds like he does have some explaining to do...
 

Oriana

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SAL is spewing vile left, left and center. This was just the start:


Sue-Ann Levy @SueAnnLevy · 37m
Just heard Dr. Zane Cohen say Ford's lifestyle had 0 to do with this rare tumour. Take that you disgusting lefties and media mouthpieces.
 

dt_toronto_geek

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do the math if 30% of our population is overweight or obese and this cancer only account for 1% of cancer types.

clearly obesity/lifestyle is not a factor.

I tend to believe the expert, Dr. Cohen on the information he put out, he's the expert. Generally, being overweight/obese is indeed a risk factor for cancers, and other diseases, let's never confuse that fact.
 
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