Northern Light

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New app, in the AIC; for a 29-storey, purpose-built rental.

The given address is that of an existing 20-storey rental which will remain.

As such, this new tower will be located on what is now surface parking fronting Jarvis Street.

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Link: http://app.toronto.ca/AIC/index.do?folderRsn=n9MpjutyjiNjxysTdg8OwQ==

Streetview:

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Aerial Pic:

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Northern Light

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*Docs are up*

Architect is IBI...............and it's their usual effort.

Proponent is: Glen-Huntley Holdings Limited and APS Holdings Limited

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From the Planning Rationale Report:

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Unit Total: 213
Resident Parking: 35

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cd concept

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Nice earth tone cladding colours for this 70s kind of looking fasade well needed in this area! Like the window configuration on the south side of the building!
 

whatever

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If they're serious about making this a transit-oriented development, I'd like to see the driveway access to Jarvis removed, and some kind of retail unit put into the base.

The blank wall facing onto Casey House's lawn is also unfortunate. That property is so unlikely to ever be redeveloped that it would be worth giving that elevation a better treatment.
 

edenlively

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Having this built 10 ft from our balconies and windows at 10 Huntley Street, over many years, will essentially represent a forced eviction for anyone currently living in the building who works shift works, overnights, or from home. We've just settled from an incredible amount of pollution disturbance with the repair of the watermains on Jarvis Street, now Glencorp wants to rip everything up again, right on top of us, and make us live with the sounds of screeching metal, drilling concrete, etc., for many long, long years. And that's if everything goes well.

This neighborhood already has the highest population density per square meter of any district in the entirety of Canada. Our infrastructure is already taxed to the limit, this addition will only add more pressure to those already struggling systems, and displace even more of us than have already been displaced by the pandemic.

No one at 10 Huntley wants this. No one in the St Jamestown neighborhood wants this. It will be a years-long nightmare for all of us who have to live and work here.

Put a community center in. A couple of floors, geared to low-income families who need the support. What we do NOT need is any more apartments on this block.
 

Northern Light

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Having this built 10 ft from our balconies and windows at 10 Huntley Street, over many years, will essentially represent a forced eviction for anyone currently living in the building who works shift works, overnights, or from home. We've just settled from an incredible amount of pollution disturbance with the repair of the watermains on Jarvis Street, now Glencorp wants to rip everything up again, right on top of us, and make us live with the sounds of screeching metal, drilling concrete, etc., for many long, long years. And that's if everything goes well.

This neighborhood already has the highest population density per square meter of any district in the entirety of Canada. Our infrastructure is already taxed to the limit, this addition will only add more pressure to those already struggling systems, and displace even more of us than have already been displaced by the pandemic.

No one at 10 Huntley wants this. No one in the St Jamestown neighborhood wants this. It will be a years-long nightmare for all of us who have to live and work here.

Put a community center in. A couple of floors, geared to low-income families who need the support. What we do NOT need is any more apartments on this block.

I can understand your concern as a tenant in respect of construction noise, and don't want to understate the hassle that can represent. Virtually no one wants to live next to that.

However, I would suggest to you that a private developer/landlord is not about to build a community centre as gesture of good will; nor is the City in the market to build another community centre at this spot, having just built relatively new facilities in St James Town.

I would also put forth that while you are housed, which is great; many others are not, and/or are in overcrowded or sub-standard units, as such, more purpose-built rental housing is broadly desirable. One can always debate the specific virtues or shortcomings of any given proposal or site; but one's preferences aside, your area will see thousands more units built, many are already approved, and more are in process. For that reason, I would suggest that it may be a better course of action to get the best version of this proposal approved, one that can benefit existing tenants, rather than opposing it outright, which I suspect you'll find will be for naught.

In respect of a new building here, it should be possible to negotiate for improved amenities or repairs to the existing building as part of the approval process, or to secure new amenities for existing tenants within the new building.

Construction noise/dust would be difficult to mitigate, and I suspect the answer there is to ask fair rent abatement offers for those most acutely affected and/or relocation assistance.
 

edenlively

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The St James Town neighborhood has, and I quote, a 502% higher population density than anywhere else in the entire country of Canada, let alone the city of Toronto.

And let's not kid ourselves. This building isn't being proposed for the good of the people you purport are so desperately needing to he helped with apartment availability. As a new building immune to rent control measures, this project will benefit only the financial interests of those invested in its construction, and it will most certainly contribute to the housing affordability crisis that has this city firmly under its heel. It will further contribute to the nauseating levels of inequality and victimization of the underprivileged people that call this neighborhood home, who depend on the Casey House next door for the services and safe haven it provides. It will arrest and hinder the movement of traffic in this high population area, worsen noise and air pollution for years, and throw hundreds if not thousands of people already living in this neighborhood into organizational disarray, take away their right to a reasonable level of peace and quiet for countless months without reprieve, and I will once again reiterate this point: this proposal will further overburden a struggling, broken infrastructure that desperately requires address beforehand.

You cannot simply add more and more weight to a broken foundation and expect it to hold. This project is inappropriate and lacks any semblance of consequential forethought in both its timing and its application.
 
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HousingNowTO

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The St Jamestown neighborhood has, and I quote, a 502% higher population density than anywhere else in the entire country of Canada, let alone the city of Toronto.

And let's not kid ourselves. This building isn't being proposed for the good of the people you purport are so desperately needing to he helped with apartment availability. As a new building immune to rent control measures, this project will benefit only the financial interests of those invested in its construction, and it will most certainly contribute to the housing affordability crisis that has this city firmly under its heel. It will further contribute to the nauseating levels of inequality and victimization of the underprivileged people that call this neighborhood home, who depend on the Casey House next door for the services and safe haven it provides. It will arrest and hinder the movement of traffic in this high population area, worsen noise and air pollution for years, and throw hundreds if not thousands of people already living in this neighborhood into organizational disarray, take away their right to a reasonable level of peace and quiet for countless months without reprieve, and I will once again reiterate this point: this proposal will further overburden a struggling, broken infrastructure that desperately requires address beforehand.

You cannot simply add more and more weight to a broken foundation and expect it to hold. This project is inappropriate and lacks any semblance of consequential forethought in both its timing and its application.
So, build nothing on downtown parking-lots - is your answer to a growing population and housing crisis..? Is that correct..?
 

interchange42

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The St James Town neighborhood has, and I quote, a 502% higher population density than anywhere else in the entire country of Canada, let alone the city of Toronto.
The deal with statistics is that if they are misquoted, or quoted out of the original context even slightly, they become not only meaningless, but can also be unhelpful to your cause (other than with gullible fools who will take them at face value… and yes, you'll find lots of people who will simply believe you).

For the record though, St James Town does NOT have "a 502% higher population density than anywhere else in the entire country of Canada, let alone the city of Toronto." (Another way to say it: "population density 5 times that of anywhere else" etc.

The Canada part is not that important. Canada is mostly vast forests and prairies and lakes and taiga or tundra, our cities are comparative specks on the landscape, so there's no point in comparing St James Town to the country as a whole. But just for the sake of stats, Canada's population density according to the 2021 census was 3.92 person per km². The population density of the central tract of St James Town (0065.02) was 77,543.3 per km². That's 19,781.454 times the national average. Yup, St James Town is stratospherically denser than the national average…

…but it's how it compares to the rest of Toronto that actually means something, and there are rivals for the high numbers in other parts of the city…

…like in tract 0062.04, bounded by St Joseph, Yonge, College, and Bay, where it was 70,156.4 km², and where there is a pile more population coming in approved and under construction towers (and more seeking approval as well).

St James Town has only 110.52% or 1.1 times the population density of that area…

…and in fact there are 73 census tracts in the GTA where the population of St James Town is less than 502% or 5 times their populations. So yes, St James Town is dense, but there are lots of other areas of Toronto within the same general realm of density. As tall towers continue to sprout up around the city, St James Town will stand out less and less comparatively and will likely be surpassed, possibly by the 2026 census.

The point isn't the numbers so much, but how well the neighbourhood is capable of handling them. St James Town has benefitted from new City facilities in the last few years, but it still needs more of them, its road network needs its gaps filled in, and many of its existing towers need reinvestment to improve their conditions. A multi-pronged approach is needed to continue improving the area, and the sad truth is that to get some of the building owners to fix up current buildings, they may only be compelled to do that through agreements with the City that allow them to further densify other parts of their landholdings. In this case, that's what the City should do: demand a slew of improvements to the existing building on the lot, including giving the current residents access to a pile of new amenities that would be part of the new build. There's no reason to leave the surface parking lot as surface parking; that does no-one any good. A well planned building in its place, and the parking moved underground, might take away some westward views, but it will be an overall benefit to the urban fabric and for hundreds of people who are trying to find a place to live in Toronto.

42

PS: In a half hour search, I can't find anything that correlates to the 502% number. Did you just pull it out of thin air?
PPS: Here's the 2021 census data by tract for the Toronto CMA
 

HousingNowTO

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The deal with statistics is that if they are misquoted, or quoted out of the original context even slightly, they become not only meaningless, but can also be unhelpful to your cause (other than with gullible fools who will take them at face value… and yes, you'll find lots of people who will simply believe you).

For the record though, St James Town does NOT have "a 502% higher population density than anywhere else in the entire country of Canada, let alone the city of Toronto." (Another way to say it: "population density 5 times that of anywhere else" etc.
Ever thus...
 

Rascacielo

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St James Town might once have been the densest neighborhood in Toronto, but that was before City Place, the Entertainment District and Humber Bay Shores came into existence. Even Yonge & Eglinton may be denser than St James Town these days. I love how people quote stats like 'Yonge Street is the longest street in the world" as if we were still in 1990s.
 

UtakataNoAnnex

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PS: In a half hour search, I can't find anything that correlates to the 502% number. Did you just pull it out of thin air?
...a long with everything else this individual was claiming it appears. /sigh
 

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