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allengeorge

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which makes one think that lessons have been learned and we are getting better at designing and building them…. especially surface LRT.
There is a very strong argument for us making constant small extensions and keeping this base of institutional (both government and the private sector) knowledge alive, thus making future projects faster to deliver.

Kinda the “practice makes perfect” model.
 

GenerationW

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In China, if the workers or NIMBYs complain about anything (IE. noise, expropriation, safety, etc.), they get a long vacation, with free room and board, at a government facility. That's why things there are built fast.
No one is advocating being like China, but we should have been better than 11-12 years for this to be fully completed.
 

trtcttc

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No one is advocating being like China, but we should have been better than 11-12 years for this to be fully completed.

Talking about China will become needlessly political, but even liberal Western countries are able to build lines cheaply and on time. Countries such as Spain, South Korea, Japan, Portugal all cost less than the PRC.

 

superelevation

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They probably demanded to have access to track level at anytime to repair an upgrade their stuff. When things break, they'll be pointing fingers.

Canadian businesses aren't nice, they sue each other's ass off when stuff like that happens. Plus they could try to break the competitors stuff to gain an upper hand. Bell installed their fiber network in my neighbourhood and caused multiple Rogers outages cause they didn't care about their cables when they were drilling. The Rogers technicians says they did it on purpose so you get frustrated and switch to Bell. So did they do it on purpose? Hmmm... either way the other network isn't working.

Have they even settle all the disagreement on construction related issues with the TYSSE?
Exactly, people here are acting like this cant be done, while meanwhile it has been done already in Montreal and Vancouver.

Typical Toronto: If we can't do it, its impossible.
Again for the people in the back!
 

kamira51

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There is a very strong argument for us making constant small extensions and keeping this base of institutional (both government and the private sector) knowledge alive, thus making future projects faster to deliver.

Kinda the “practice makes perfect” model.
I guess you could apply that to Metrolinx with its recent shift to a system of multiple contracts for a single project, compared to previous system of just a single contract for the whole project.
 

WillTo

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Open in 2023.
2024 it will close again for a few months when they find defects à la Confederation Line.
 

EastYorkTTCFan

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Open in 2023.
2024 it will close again for a few months when they find defects à la Confederation Line.
I doubt we will have problems like that. The TTC and Metrolinx both have experience with building rail transit and commissioning it., something that the builders of the Confederation line clearly didn't
 

trtcttc

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I doubt we will have problems like that. The TTC and Metrolinx both have experience with building rail transit and commissioning it., something that the builders of the Confederation line clearly didn't
Also for as may issues as BBD had with the TTC Flexity Outlooks, they’ve worked those out the last few years and the Freedom is fairly similar and has been used in winter conditions elsewhere. Ottawa was the first operator to use the Alstom Citadis Spirit and a lot of the early issues were vehicle related.
 

trtcttc

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My dad was driving me home last night when he stopped at this red light intended for trains pulling out of the portal
(covered in this streetview capture): https://www.google.ca/maps/@43.7193...4!1sVnFAEb8qBWAGmq9HmWIQOQ!2e0!7i16384!8i8192
I actually just saw this light tonight… are they keeping that as a Red signal? Seems like they should’ve used the transit bar signal, or maybe they’ll learn their lesson after an accident happens when a car suddenly breaks thinking that’s a red light.
 

KevinT

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I actually just saw this light tonight… are they keeping that as a Red signal? Seems like they should’ve used the transit bar signal, or maybe they’ll learn their lesson after an accident happens when a car suddenly breaks thinking that’s a red light.

Waterloo's ION only uses the white bar signals at mixed traffic intersections, on the off-street rights of way they still use red and green circles, and on the in-median rights of way they use red, green, and yellow bars. This crossover protection signal would have been bars in Waterloo, and placed as a double head in the center of the median rather than hung off to the right so close to the car traffic:

 

W. K. Lis

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Toronto, Ontario refuses to use transit specific signals that the rest of the world uses (along with no wasteful verbage signs), because we didn't "invent" them. Watch us make "our own" transit signals that doesn't work properly.

fig8c_03.gif
From link.
 

drum118

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