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toronto647

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Yeah the way it is written makes it sound like they are talking about line 6; but it isn't behind schedule... But that's only in the title *shrug*
According to weather meteorologists Toronto is expected to get a harsher than usual Winter season and I am sure Metrolinx/IO/MTO/TTC/Contractors will want to test the trains in those harsh conditions. The earliest opening date I can see is sometime in March 2023.
 

Transportfan

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In some future reality the line could even go down the Mississauga Transitway and get a short elevated section to Square One!

🤣

They should rough-in a section for trains to continue straight to the Transitway on the Hurontario LRT elevated structure leading to the CC Terminal for this possibility.
 

LemonCondo

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The line is heading towards being split at Kennedy. What this will mean is the better option will just be to grade separate the section east of Science Center, and put it out of it's misery.


The "explanation" being given is that the SSE wasn't designed in a way to easily allow for an eastern extension to Line 5, and as such making 1 continuous line will be expensive and time consuming. However, Metrolinx almost immediately made a statement saying that none of this is true. Given that the city of Toronto has a pretty lengthy history of, let's call it smudging, data to push a specific alignment or design decision that they want to build I'm more willing to believe Metrolinx in this case. The actual reason has likely more to do with making the extension cheaper by allowing them to run smaller trams, and thus save money by not burying certain stations namely Midland and Lawrence-Kingston-Morningside.

If the east extension is built with a different technology that is not interoperable with line 5, that would be probably the stupidest decision ever made in the history of Toronto transit.
 

ARG1

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If the east extension is built with a different technology that is not interoperable with line 5, that would be probably the stupidest decision ever made in the history of Toronto transit.
Make it Toronto Streetcar standard, and extend the Kingston Streetcar to meet it at Eglinton/Kingston.
 

superelevation

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Steve X

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Don't think they have enough trains for 3 cars in revenue service - they are just testing
Sure they do. They only need 20 trains to meet service requirements in the next 5 years. Running 60 LRVs gives them a spare of 16 LRVs which would be perfectly fine.

Right now they always have too many LRVs and needed more frequent service to put them all in use.
 

cplchanb

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Sure they do. They only need 20 trains to meet service requirements in the next 5 years. Running 60 LRVs gives them a spare of 16 LRVs which would be perfectly fine.

Right now they always have too many LRVs and needed more frequent service to put them all in use.
i recall comments back a couple years claiming that ECT will already be almost at max capacity shortly after opening and that they shouldve done subways and all that...
whats happened now?
 

LemonCondo

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Anti-LRT, pro-subway people frequently misrepresent their positions to make subways seem like the supreme choice.

Unfortunately we love to build sort-of crap LRTs here. I'm not saying tunnel everything, but if we had elevated LRT going everywhere it would be a very high quality and cost effective solution.
 

T3G

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There's nothing wrong with having surface running LRTs in their own private rights-of-way, they function perfectly fine all over Europe. Our issues are a lack of transit priority, and, in the case of the TTC, excessively frequent stops and silly operational rules that do nothing but to kneecap their operations.

Having elevated structures where there is no requirement for them is just another frivolous cost and something else to maintain.
 

LemonCondo

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There's nothing wrong with having surface running LRTs in their own private rights-of-way, they function perfectly fine all over Europe. Our issues are a lack of transit priority, and, in the case of the TTC, excessively frequent stops and silly operational rules that do nothing but to kneecap their operations.

Having elevated structures where there is no requirement for them is just another frivolous cost and something else to maintain.

Well good luck trying to implement aggressive transit priority in Toronto...
 

cplchanb

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There's nothing wrong with having surface running LRTs in their own private rights-of-way, they function perfectly fine all over Europe. Our issues are a lack of transit priority, and, in the case of the TTC, excessively frequent stops and silly operational rules that do nothing but to kneecap their operations.

Having elevated structures where there is no requirement for them is just another frivolous cost and something else to maintain.
That's the problem. They won't do TP unless we force it on them. It seems like the only way is to use alternate means of construction to take that out of the equation
 

felix123

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That's the problem. They won't do TP unless we force it on them. It seems like the only way is to use alternate means of construction to take that out of the equation
Yep, you can lead a Toronto to transit priority, but you can't make them enable it, it seems.
If TSP is a boogeyman in Toronto, then we need grade separation at intersections.
 

T3G

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Grade separation isn't a panacea, and comes with its own tradeoffs, most notably in the fact that any new amount of trackage is going to cost much more than if you placed it in the median of the road. Is that a worthwhile tradeoff? A smaller network for having that network run quicker? I don't have the answers, but as with many things in life the answer is in no way simple or easy.
 

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