rpeters

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500m is really nothing. If you live at Queen/Woodbine, wouldn't you tell people you live at the "beaches" when the beach is actually 500m away?

kind of a weird analogy, the beaches is a neighbourhood. "dundas square" is not a neighbourhood.
 

ksun

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kind of a weird analogy, the beaches is a neighbourhood. "dundas square" is not a neighbourhood.

true, but "the beaches" gives people the impression of proximity to the beaches, not so much different from Dundas Square Garden reminds us of the property being close to Dundas Square. The condo has as much to do with the square as a house at Queen/Woodbine to do with the woodbine beach.

I too agree the rendering is misleading, but the name is just fine.
 

Torontovibe

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Maybe now that whole area between Yonge Street and Jarvis, will take on the name Dundas Square as a neighbourhood name, like Times Square and Piccadilly are used for their surrounding areas.
 
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Torontovibe

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^^ The complete redevelopment of Dundas, from Yonge to River Street, wouldn't hurt. Regent Park is doing its part, now we just need the rest of that street transformed. I'm sure it's just a matter of time. The location is just too good, to let the area languish.
 

Edward Skira

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Isn't that exactly what is happening with Pace and this one starting the process? I'd add Core as well. In 10 years people talking about how horrible this area is will be eating their words. Those that buy here will see huge appreciation on their purchase.
 

modernizt

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I still can't believe what a change this area has seen since I lived there about 4 years ago. I remember thinking perhaps Dundas would start to catch some of the nearby momentum soon, and it did just that! I had my skepticism, but the area has proved me wrong. It's interesting how people haven't considered Dundas to be a particularly desirable street to live on, given how central and convenient it is. I guess that's changing.
 

Hanlansboy

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Isn't that exactly what is happening with Pace and this one starting the process? I'd add Core as well. In 10 years people talking about how horrible this area is will be eating their words. Those that buy here will see huge appreciation on their purchase.

You know what? I really hope I am proven wrong, maybe this building will help the area clean up it's image, but historically, it's always been an area plagued with crime. Question is, if the area is cleaned up, where do the, how shall I put this?, the scary residents go? You can only move the problem, in order to fix it, the government really needs to step up it game to help those less fortunate. Time will tell, and again, I hope I'm wrong, I don't mind admitting it when the end result is potentially so positive.
 

innsertnamehere

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They don't go anywhere, they simply are no longer the only ones there. It's like yonge street, lots of rather shady people but lots of "regular" people as well, so it doesn't feel as bad.
 

themarc

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They don't go anywhere, they simply are no longer the only ones there. It's like yonge street, lots of rather shady people but lots of "regular" people as well, so it doesn't feel as bad.

They plan on greatly reducing the number of male shelter beds on George Street - from something like 650+ down to about 150+ and they look to shift capacity around to other shelters. Evergreen has been sold and will be vacating Yonge Street in a while. I think the shedding of critical mass sheltering in the area will help the area spring to life - just have to wonder what the impact will be on the areas where the capacity gets shifted off to...
 

ksun

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I still can't believe what a change this area has seen since I lived there about 4 years ago. I remember thinking perhaps Dundas would start to catch some of the nearby momentum soon, and it did just that! I had my skepticism, but the area has proved me wrong. It's interesting how people haven't considered Dundas to be a particularly desirable street to live on, given how central and convenient it is. I guess that's changing.

Dundas St is about 1.9km from Lake Ontario and 1.9 km from Yorkville.
Geographically, Dundas is as central as it gets in downtown Toronto. It is pretty odd that both Dundas E and Dundas W look like crap.
 

interchange42

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What does Dundas's equidistance from those poles have to do with anything? The development and redevelopment of cities has nothing to do with an orderly progression of work across an undifferentiated plain. The Planning Department is not the Central Planning Department, and the forces of the marketplace pop up here and there within the city as innumerable variables trigger certain properties as the subject of redevelopment at times particular to each. Depending on where you are on Dundas, there's all sorts of stuff going on. "Dundas E and Dundas W look like crap" is one of the classic UT generalizations of late which means nothing, kkgg.

42
 

Uptowner

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While it's clear there have been significant improvements I wouldn't be too sure about how good of an investment some of these places are. I am reluctant to name a specific residence but the way many people in social housing there treat the homes they live in is as negligent as ever. They really seem to not care about the community even when given this chance. There seems to be almost no civic pride or sense they have an investment in the community. Some people raised on the public purse give the impression they feel even the most basic effort to maintain neighborhood standards is always the duty of someone else.

I started to write a longer post and wanted to say much more but decided to delete it because I do hope the area continues to improve and I want to be careful not to be unfairly negative. It is a good experiment but one of the things we may learn/have learned/relearn from it is that to have a nice community you may need to have an extremely low percentage of social housing.
 
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