sixrings

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Yeah. It was posted earlier in this thread that a sales office is going there.
A parking lot and a sales office can go up. And they can sell out the condos still before the work on the north side of the street is complete. Which would mean that the machines can still come immediately south to start construction after they are done north of burnamthorpe
 

bangkok

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The area looks way too big for just a sales office and parking. This is an older shot but better shows the footprint:
DJI_0700.JPG



Compare it to this shot of the Voya sales office which I found in my files:

DJI_0782.JPG


Yes, I'm sure it will eventually be a sales office but right now it looks more suitable for trades parking or an equipment or material lot.
 

mininamib

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There are so many parking lots all around Square One area. It will probably take 30 years before they are all filled in.

Mississauga skyline by 2050 will look amazing. Too bad I will be in my 60s
I feel the same way :-( Who knows, maybe the carpark infill will be completed by the mid-late 2030's or 2040s?!
 

isaidso

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Well, building density is only the first step. If they don't eventually turn their attention to pedestrianization, reducing 8-10 lane highways to 2-4 lanes, and building a quality public realm it will be all for nought. What good is a skyline if the only appealing places to be are indoors?

There's a reason those sidewalks are deserted. It's not like tourists are flooding into Mississauga to stroll/hang out on Hurontario .....or any street in Mississauga for that matter. Building density is STEP ONE.
 

Fresh_mint

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Well, building density is only the first step. If they don't eventually turn their attention to pedestrianization, reducing 8-10 lane highways to 2-4 lanes, and building a quality public realm it will be all for nought. What good is a skyline if the only appealing places to be are indoors?

There's a reason those sidewalks are deserted. It's not like tourists are flooding into Mississauga to stroll/hang out on Hurontario .....or any street in Mississauga for that matter. Building density is STEP ONE.
YES!!!! City Centre Dr is always deserted but yet the city hall and library, YMCA, and Square One all share this common road. Adding protected bike lanes would be a great first step in making a more appealing landscape.
 

sixrings

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The added population in the city centre will start to demand more pedestrian friendly streets. The new tax payers demands will change mcc not the suburban Mississauga residents doing the right thing and thinking of others first.
 

Undead

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The added population in the city centre will start to demand more pedestrian friendly streets.
I don't know about that if local planning policy continues to force high parking ratios in MCC condos. The new residents are likely to prefer higher auto capacity.

The new tax payers demands will change mcc not the suburban Mississauga residents doing the right thing and thinking of others first.
I mean, there's much more to being virtuous than merely demanding sidewalks/bike lanes 🤷‍♂️
 

sixrings

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I don't know about that if local planning policy continues to force high parking ratios in MCC condos. The new residents are likely to prefer higher auto capacity.


I mean, there's much more to being virtuous than merely demanding sidewalks/bike lanes 🤷‍♂️
Doing the right thing, in this case was being more urban friendly. That doesn’t mean that there aren’t other issues that deserved attention… racism, sexism, etc. I didn’t think I’d have to specify that on a urban forum.

For better or worse when the entertainment district started building condos there started to be more and more rules which club owners and their visitors protested but were better for the residents in the area. Eventually the residents won that battle.

Only recently has Toronto accepted that bike lanes should be a thing after so many new residents who lived downtown complained and demanded them.

Only recently has things passed like making Yonge street a pedestrian area. Again something brought on by the influx of new residents to the area.

These things take time. Mississauga will likely always be behind Toronto. That doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t try or put effort into it.

As for parking. I have lived downtown Calgary, Toronto, Ottawa. All three places I had parking and most of my neighbours did as well. That said our cars got very few kms on them in a year because it was simply easier to walk to the places we wanted to go then to jump in a car. For instance most of the people who live at mcc will shop at square one. That will stop a car trip. If the buildings have grocery stores and or pharmacies under them that will also stop a car trip. If the people want to go to the movies they will likely walk. If they want to go to the library they will likely walk. Perhaps they will want to drive to work but work is changing and there will be more work from home stopping additional car trips.

Density is coming and the area will slowly become more urban one way or another.
 

mininamib

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These things take time. Mississauga will likely always be behind Toronto. That doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t try or put effort into it.

To pick up on this point, some of the longterm projects in Mississauga such as the Dundas BRT already include reducing lanes for cars and adding in more space for pedestrians, cyclists, and trees. I believe this is certainly the sentiment in that city.
I think it will be interesting to see how the various levels of resistance in city-planning and amongst residents in different suburbs at present will translate to different (sub)urban-landscapes in the coming decades. Mississauga and Vaughan, for example, seem to be more progressive and ambitious on this front whereas Oakville and Burlington aren't and opt for more modest changes with still lots of dependency on cars (when was the last time that public transit was to be majorly overhauled in those suburbs? How much resistance has there been towards increasing densities around GO stations for making complete communities that are truly walkable?). These differences will then become more apparent once the many projects come to fruition.
 

Mercenary

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To pick up on this point, some of the longterm projects in Mississauga such as the Dundas BRT already include reducing lanes for cars and adding in more space for pedestrians, cyclists, and trees. I believe this is certainly the sentiment in that city.
I think it will be interesting to see how the various levels of resistance in city-planning and amongst residents in different suburbs at present will translate to different (sub)urban-landscapes in the coming decades. Mississauga and Vaughan, for example, seem to be more progressive and ambitious on this front whereas Oakville and Burlington aren't and opt for more modest changes with still lots of dependency on cars (when was the last time that public transit was to be majorly overhauled in those suburbs? How much resistance has there been towards increasing densities around GO stations for making complete communities that are truly walkable?). These differences will then become more apparent once the many projects come to fruition.

This is a 30 year effort to transform the core of Mississauga into a pedestrian and transit oriented area. There needs to be a GO Train station at MCC/Square One Area.
 

mininamib

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This is a 30 year effort to transform the core of Mississauga into a pedestrian and transit oriented area. There needs to be a GO Train station at MCC/Square One Area.

But do you reckon that they would be able to build a GO Train station there? I don't think any deviations from current lines could be undertaken or room for a new line could be made... Or could I be wrong on this? It would have been great if there was already a rapid transit connection between Mississauga City Centre and downtown Toronto in place before lots of the current development was built.
 

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