crs1026

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I’m a little perplexed as to why they would pour a headwall rather than just extend the golf-tee style guideway south over Wallace. Perhaps they need a span over the roadway that is longer than the pre-poured concrete method will permit and/or heavier than the round pillars can support..

To my mind, the Wallace crossing is the most critical bit of the streetscape along the guideway and deserved the most attention to creative design. So far I’m not impressed with the result….. feels claustrophobic, creates walls and a bit like the underside of the Gardiner. Maybe it’s too soon to judge.

- Paul
 

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It is quite low, unfortunately. I'll get a pic when I can, but the bit they were pouring above was maybe 2m off the ground? It could be that the steel torques against the concrete in a way that the golf tees can't handle. It's steel to supported earth guideway up past the North Toronto too. The Paton Road underpass is super low as well.
 

innsertnamehere

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is the plan to regrade Wallace a bit to improve vertical clearances? It definitely does a bit of a "hump" upwards a bit as it crosses the tracks from what I recall, I imagine it wouldn't be too challenging to get it to "hump" downwards a bit instead.
 

innsertnamehere

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I’m a little perplexed as to why they would pour a headwall rather than just extend the golf-tee style guideway south over Wallace. Perhaps they need a span over the roadway that is longer than the pre-poured concrete method will permit and/or heavier than the round pillars can support..

To my mind, the Wallace crossing is the most critical bit of the streetscape along the guideway and deserved the most attention to creative design. So far I’m not impressed with the result….. feels claustrophobic, creates walls and a bit like the underside of the Gardiner. Maybe it’s too soon to judge.

- Paul
renderings indicate a steel span over Wallace, and my guess is it's to improve clearance heights for the road. You can see the height differential the steel span provides over the concrete girders in the rendering below:

Davenport-Diamond-Image-2-External-1024x473.jpg
 

vic

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I notice that (old) rendering at least uses pillars instead of a solid wall on the north side. Sigh.

[The bizarre steel fencing in the rendering is another issue I will ignore]
 

crs1026

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^That render does seem to suggest that the steel span gives more vertical clearance than the concrete span north of it does. Maybe that's part of the reason.

I hope that the span being poured does retain the H shape so there is an opening in its middle.

- Paul
 
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I notice that (old) rendering at least uses pillars instead of a solid wall on the north side. Sigh.

[The bizarre steel fencing in the rendering is another issue I will ignore]
The pour going on right now mimics that rendering. The formwork is more extensive than the finished product.

^That render does seem to suggest that the steel span gives more vertical clearance than the concrete span north of it does. Maybe that's part of the reason.

I hope that the span being poured does retain the H shape so there is an opening in its middle.

- Paul
It does.
 

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The Newmarket sub used to have block signals (at least, not sure if full CTC) to at least Gravenhurst until sometime in the early 2010s. The signals can clearly be seen on old Google Street View imagery of the ONR station in Gravenhurst, and a decommissioned signal (the head is turned away from the track) can clearly be seen from the southbound lanes on Highway 11 just outside Gravenhurst. I assume the signals were decommissioned at least partly due to the elimination of the Northlander, I think there's only one scheduled through train on this line in each direction (there might still be one or two switchers on parts of it too) so I'm not even sure how common meets are anymore.
On my training runs to North bay meets it was usually timed so that the northbound met the southbound at Brechin Siding... on the Bala sub the signal masts are still there but turned and off now.. there is also a switcher at Huntsville but it's a small multitrack yard there
 

KevinT

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Yes but macyard is rule 105 territory, plus freight and remote control locomotives would probably get priority

I did say 'in theory'. There's no way I would expect CN to agree to rearrange everything in their yard and halt operations to let VIA pull off that loop a few times a week.
 

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Yeah, I think as far as introductions to Toronto go, you can't beat the Don Valley. Easily the most picturesque part of the city.

I can think of far worse rail corridors to introduce tourists to Toronto (the Galt subdivision which the Milton GO line runs on, through Mississauga, is the bleakest rail line I have ever had the misfortune of clapping my eyes on).

The CN Uxbridge Sub (Stouffville Line) isn’t great either, but at least you get to enter central Toronto with great views.

The Bala Sub is great, especially south of York Mills Road, and the Kingston Sub as it hugs Lake Ontario near Rouge Hill Station is pretty sweet.

The Weston Sub (Kitchener Line) has decent views in places, though the Weston, Junction, and Strachan underpasses aren’t amazing.

I concur, the Milton Line is the least visually appealing, with the Humber River Bridge being the only real highlight. It doesn’t even cross the Credit River at a scenic location.
 
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crs1026

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The Weston Sub (Kitchener Line) has decent views in places, though the king underpasses aren’t amazing..

I always cringe when I take the UP home from Pearson……. what kind of first impression do first-time visitors get ? (It gets better closer in to the city).

But hey, the first couple miles on RER out of Charles de Gaulle aren’t exactly the Champs Elysees, either.

- Paul
 

ShonTron

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I always cringe when I take the UP home from Pearson……. what kind of first impression do first-time visitors get ? (It gets better closer in to the city).

But hey, the first couple miles on RER out of Charles de Gaulle aren’t exactly the Champs Elysees, either.

- Paul

The first minute of the ride from Pearson offers a great view. I can’t think of a major international airport - apart from HKIA or maybe SFO - that does have a great view by rail from the terminal, as you’re in industrial areas or fields. Have you taken a train from EWR?

Once you get to the Humber River, the view to the city is pretty good again, especially through Mount Dennis.
 
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drum118

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I always cringe when I take the UP home from Pearson……. what kind of first impression do first-time visitors get ? (It gets better closer in to the city).

But hey, the first couple miles on RER out of Charles de Gaulle aren’t exactly the Champs Elysees, either.

- Paul
Its a lot better than places you find in Europe or the US.
 

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