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That’s correct. Once the existing track is removed, the ramp will be widened.

- Paul
I'd be pleasantly surprised if they went ahead with the widening right away. Service patterns aren't going to require 2 tracks for some time, so I'd expect the single-trackage on a twin-track bridge to be the reality for a few years now. At least until double tracking progress along the rest of the line requires it...

Again though, I'd love to be surprised!
 

crs1026

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I'd be pleasantly surprised if they went ahead with the widening right away. Service patterns aren't going to require 2 tracks for some time, so I'd expect the single-trackage on a twin-track bridge to be the reality for a few years now. At least until double tracking progress along the rest of the line requires it...

Again though, I'd love to be surprised!

The various powerpoints from community consultations seemed to imply that the widened ramp is within the existing contract and work plan. I would be surprised if they don't get that grading done once the first track is in service and the existing track is removed. I agree that there wont be need for the second track for a while, but if nothing else, finishing the grading stands in the way of getting on with the linear park, so I would expect it should be done quickly. And, that way we have the original contractor finishing the work without demobilising and then having to remobilise later.

As far as completing on time, it does look like it may be a tight race. The orange tarping in those latest photos implies that concrete is still being poured. I wonder how long that will take to complete that work down the entire length of the guideway. And, I wonder whether the contractor is eager to do other finishing up tasks once trains are running on the guideway.... that will slow down the work for things like completing the sound wall installation, and whatever tie-ins etc are needed between the two guideway lanes.

As far as actually laying the track, it's not uncommon for derailments to require the replacement of similar lengths of track. The railroads manage that in hours or days rather than weeks. So once there is completed rail on the guideway itself, laying down the ends can be done in a flash, thermite welds and all.

I wonder if the contractor has blown by their performance incentives already. If not, I would predict that we will see day-and-night work to get to the finish line on time. It's not the last minute..... yet.

- Paul
 

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To Paul's point, it's worth mentioning that just within my perspective I can usually see 100+ folks on site per day (the majority of whom are up on the guideway). There are more in the south and north sections too.

They are definitely trying, but I'm still skeptical...
 

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It would make sense to me (depending on the terms of the contract of course) for the primary contractor to complete the job so they can get sign off, pay and release their sub-contractors and trades (so they can move on), return any leased equipment, and start any warranty clock running. Also, work to clean up the hundred little jobs that may be remaining would go a whole lot faster when it is not an active rail line. If one set of rails sit for a few years, so be it. Even if the second track isn't in the contract to be laid, I don't think that is a huge issue down the road. As Paul says, connecting the new alignment to the active one is relatively straight forward.
 

W. K. Lis

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Personally, I would leave the old railway tracks in the pedestrian walkway and cycling path. While not being used, it could be used as an emergency siding.
 

Toolio555

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Personally, I would leave the old railway tracks in the pedestrian walkway and cycling path. While not being used, it could be used as an emergency siding.
G*d forbid they would do this. The intersecting metal tracks is what is causing the extreme noise for the whole neighbourhood when the train wheels strikes the diamond it sounds like there is bombs going off multiple times a day 24 hours a day, try living with that? Metrolinx is commissioned to remove the CP owned intersecting go train tracks once go trains start rolling onto the guideway. This is the most important thing for nearby residents. All other things like the fancy path personally I could care less about. Lol stick to your day job (hopefully not in construction consulting).haha
 
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lenaitch

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I'm not exactly sure what they would do with an "emergency siding". Railways and transit agencies don't typically have such a thing, probably because any trainset that went out of service would have to be nearby to make it practical and, if it were a power problem, how would it get there? On a twin-track route, they can work around any out-of-service trainset with minimal disruption via cross-overs until the train is rescued. Depending on who ultimately owns the linear park/path/bikeway, having an active siding (it would still be connected) would no doubt create legal problems.
 

drum118

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G*d forbid they would do this. The intersecting metal tracks is what is causing the extreme noise for the whole neighbourhood when the train wheels strikes the diamond it sounds like there is bombs going off multiple times a day 24 hours a day, try living with that? Metrolinx is commissioned to remove the CP owned intersecting go train tracks once go trains start rolling onto the guideway. This is the most important thing for nearby residents. All other things like the fancy path personally I could care less about. Lol stick to your day job (hopefully not in construction consulting).haha
Unless you are a 160 years old, that diamond existed long before you were born with no rights to bitch about it. You and your family chose to live there and therefore you/others accept what was there at the time of the move. Standard complaint

More trains used that diamond decades ago than what takes place for both lines. The only different for CP trains today, they are way longer than the 60's.

If you and others don't like the noise, can move out of the area anytime to a noiseless area if there is a such thing.
 

sacred

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Unless you are a 160 years old, that diamond existed long before you were born with no rights to bitch about it. You and your family chose to live there and therefore you/others accept what was there at the time of the move. Standard complaint

More trains used that diamond decades ago than what takes place for both lines. The only different for CP trains today, they are way longer than the 60's.

If you and others don't like the noise, can move out of the area anytime to a noiseless area if there is a such thing.
We should strive to improve the world, this attitude is so Toronto...
 

T3G

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We should strive to improve the world, this attitude is so Toronto...
I don't agree with the sentiment in regards to this particular piece of infrastructure, there doesn't appear to be any compelling argument in favour of maintaining the old track, but it's hard to argue with as a general rule. People who buy property next to transportation corridors and complain about the noise are silly.
 

Toolio555

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I don't agree with the sentiment in regards to this particular piece of infrastructure, there doesn't appear to be any compelling argument in favour of maintaining the old track, but it's hard to argue with as a general rule. People who buy property next to transportation corridors and complain about the noise are silly.
The noise is not normal by any means. It is not trains merely passing by it is wheels hitting metal multiple times a day. It is extremely loud. Many people who choose these units are not aware of the noise beforehand as the trains do not pass every second. You are the silly one to blame unknowing residents rather than the developers or city officials who should’ve fixed this issue many years ago and are only getting around to it now.

The train wheels hitting metal noise issue will be fixed anyway as per this whole project so any comment or suggestion otherwise is even more silly.

My bad that some people are clearly butt hurt about positive progress in the city and that some people like myself are clearly happy about the progress. This negatively reflects on you though more than it does myself so keep crying while I keep cheering on this project (with a few complaints thrown in along the way just cuz I can)! Clowns! 🤡
 
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T3G

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Many people who choose these units are not aware of the noise beforehand as the trains do not pass every second.
So the people who moved to the neighbourhood failed to do their research on the neighbourhood and are angry at the city for it? I mean, even a 2 second glance at the area at Google Maps will show you that there appear to be a lot of rail lines in the neighbourhood. Only someone who is completely oblivious, and has no business owning property, could find this to be a shock. Whatever happened to the old principles of "measure twice, cut once"?

I'm not against "positive progress" - in fact, I don't live in the area at all, and couldn't care less about anything that does or doesn't happen there. But am I going to feel sympathy for people who move to an area without doing some basic research on it and then complain about all the noise there? Don't count it.
 

Toolio555

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So the people who moved to the neighbourhood failed to do their research on the neighbourhood and are angry at the city for it? I mean, even a 2 second glance at the area at Google Maps will show you that there appear to be a lot of rail lines in the neighbourhood. Only someone who is completely oblivious, and has no business owning property, could find this to be a shock. Whatever happened to the old principles of "measure twice, cut once"?

I'm not against "positive progress" - in fact, I don't live in the area at all, and couldn't care less about anything that does or doesn't happen there. But am I going to feel sympathy for people who move to an area without doing some basic research on it and then complain about all the noise there? Don't count it.
Sure. No one needs your sympathy. Nor is asking for it. Can be argued both ways.
I have every right to complain as you have a right not to care. As I have a right to be happy about positive progress in my area.

Rail lines in an area doesn’t necessarily mean or imply ear blistering noise from trains hitting a diamond. Many other areas in Toronto have trains without this exact issue we are discussing. Yes trains are clearly visible but the diamond bomb like noise only one can hear it to really know the extent. When viewing a unit, unless the trains pass by and hit the diamond metal tracks in front of you, for most people it is difficult to realize. Also not like realtors are any help. Unfortunately we are not all train experts like yourself and Sheldon cooper

Again, as the issue will be fixed soon anyway, this is a pointless conversation leading to nowhere. Enjoy your evening!
 
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