College Park

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Feb 6, 2009
Messages
501
Reaction score
5
If this development does run up to Grosvenor, the south part of this block to go soon too.

I hope the City stipulates removing the EIFS "enhancements" - that would be a fair trade!
 

buildup

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 26, 2007
Messages
2,208
Reaction score
294
I'd love to see the clock tower preserved as well as whatever base exists. Its hard to say what exists under those other IEF frontages. Anyway if any Victorian structures still exist it would be nice to se them preserved a la FIVE.
 

AlbertC

Superstar
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 25, 2007
Messages
16,097
Reaction score
34,153
City:
Toronto
oh, no...

oh, no...

kool-aid-man.jpg
 

dt_toronto_geek

Superstar
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 24, 2007
Messages
10,946
Reaction score
111
City:
Toronto
I'd love to see the clock tower preserved as well as whatever base exists. Its hard to say what exists under those other IEF frontages. Anyway if any Victorian structures still exist it would be nice to se them preserved a la FIVE.

Totally agree, I'd like to see 480/482 restored too and worked into this proposal - anything south of there to Grenville Street is nothing special at all, except the unique retail and restaurants.
The clock tower and building below was a fire hall - wayyyy back in the late 1800's. By the middle of the 20th century it served as retail and then in the 60, 70's & 80's it was the St. Charles Tavern (Charlies upstairs), an infamous gay club in the 1970's and then very popular in the 80's. By then the exterior had already been mucked with probably decades earlier and was a nondescript brick affair with faux windows, as I recall. The ground level interior was quite something and was highlighted by an original ultra wide, two level grand staircase leading to the second floor which was all ripped out when split into several retail units in the 90's. Nothing left now, except that clock tower which will cause the developer some grief if they are proposing anything north of 480 Yonge.
 

UrbanFervour

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 25, 2010
Messages
757
Reaction score
467
Developers re getting good at moving heritage buildings (karma, cinem tower, the mansion on sherbourne...) maybe the firehall will be moved and restored. That would be the best outcome if you ask me...
 

Mongo

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 23, 2007
Messages
2,322
Reaction score
208
By the middle of the 20th century it served as retail and then in the 60, 70's & 80's it was the St. Charles Tavern (Charlies upstairs), an infamous gay club in the 1970's and then very popular in the 80's.

In the 1980s it was a well-known "drug supermarket", very easy for stoners to find with the clock tower as a location marker.
 

buildup

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 26, 2007
Messages
2,208
Reaction score
294
Totally agree, I'd like to see 480/482 restored too and worked into this proposal - anything south of there to Grenville Street is nothing special at all, except the unique retail and restaurants.
The clock tower and building below was a fire hall - wayyyy back in the late 1800's. By the middle of the 20th century it served as retail and then in the 60, 70's & 80's it was the St. Charles Tavern (Charlies upstairs), an infamous gay club in the 1970's and then very popular in the 80's. By then the exterior had already been mucked with probably decades earlier and was a nondescript brick affair with faux windows, as I recall. The ground level interior was quite something and was highlighted by an original ultra wide, two level grand staircase leading to the second floor which was all ripped out when split into several retail units in the 90's. Nothing left now, except that clock tower which will cause the developer some grief if they are proposing anything north of 480 Yonge.

Could the Clock-Tower be re-tasked as a tourist info center? It would help Yonge compete with Queen & Bloor and makes sense as Yonge is the historic artery. Possibly the City and theatre groups could provide rental income to the developer.

Related question: can anyone provide examples of other cities using similar approaches to restoring neglected main streets - ie tall towers financing the restoration of historic low-rises frontages?
 

Top