Rimsky44

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That looks great and hope it turns out well. Practically speaking, how well does it insulate, and do you need to re-seal/caulk every [x] years (what is that [x]) figure? Assumed it's covered in condo fees, but curious if it's higher maintenance or not.
 

neuhaus

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That looks great and hope it turns out well. Practically speaking, how well does it insulate, and do you need to re-seal/caulk every [x] years (what is that [x]) figure? Assumed it's covered in condo fees, but curious if it's higher maintenance or not.

The reserve fund study will determine the lifespan/maintenance for the glass block wall which is factored into the maintenance fees.
The glass block itself is a much more energy efficient material than spandrel panel as it is a much thicker and stronger material with a generous sealed airspace that’s filled with argon, from what I remembered when seeing the production of the glass blocks specifically for this building.
 
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tzchn

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The glass block walls feature a mirrored back coating (where it's a solid wall and not a window) which creates a nice luminance and depth in the sunlight.
that's a bit disappointing. so it'll be reflective instead of translucent? different than what the inspiration was from:

1632092833153.png
 

emphur

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that's a bit disappointing. so it'll be reflective instead of translucent? different than what the inspiration was from:
Some parts of the glass block wall will be translucent instead of reflective, but not all of it.
The spirit/inspiration of Mason de Verre is still there and strong.

It's also visible in the documents here. I decided to do something a little bit extra though.


blck.PNG


There's not many renders of this feature in action, but I'm a huge fan of glass block architecture. So since I'm a 3d visualization artist by trade, I thought I'd use some early glass block texture prototypes I'm crafting to show how these glass block screens will look outside and inside.

For legal reasons, these are not affiliated with or made by any architects, developers, or those involved with marketing KING Toronto, they are just my personal artistic interpretations of what the architects are going for and do not represent KING Toronto.

Which is why they are largely unfinished.
These are also rendered on low settings, as these are meant for demonstration purposes, not aesthetics.


I could go on about specifics here, but these blocks are mocked to the specs shown in the photos above, using the thin ribbed texture for light diffusion. Documents and renders suggest the openings will be sized as shown here. You can see earlier texture prototypes on the right hand side (where it looks worse).

KING1.jpg


An angle that's not been shown in renderings (that I can recall) is the glass block walls from inside. Rooms won't get two block walls like this, but it works well for showcasing it. The textures here aren't polished again, as it's for demonstration purposes only.

KING.jpg
 

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