allengeorge

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Jun 27, 2019
Messages
1,497
Reaction score
3,589
As Innsert noted, they have no legal/regulatory means to control for that. Even if they permitted different building massing, which might make better layouts easier to do, they still couldn't require
developers to use that opportunity accordingly.
If Planning is aware that over-focus on external aesthetics leads to poor units and livability, and they presumably care about the units - why not advocate for removal/relaxation of floorplate constraints? They may not have the ability to regulate unit layouts, but we are hearing here that the building envelope constraints (which they do control) are leading to poor outcomes.

Separately, what is the rationale for right constraints on separation distances? Shadowing? Wind-effects?
 

Ward8

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Sep 6, 2020
Messages
197
Reaction score
607
If Planning is aware that over-focus on external aesthetics leads to poor units and livability, and they presumably care about the units - why not advocate for removal/relaxation of floorplate constraints? They may not have the ability to regulate unit layouts, but we are hearing here that the building envelope constraints (which they do control) are leading to poor outcomes.
People would object strenuously to this because, despite the internal rational of the constraints, they are generally weaponized as a tool for local NIMBY's to fight new housing supply.
 

allengeorge

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Jun 27, 2019
Messages
1,497
Reaction score
3,589
I'm uncertain what you are asking here, could you clarify?
I’m sorry - I was using my phone, made a typo, and didn’t do a once-over.

I was asking what the planning rationale for tower separation distances was. I could only think of two things: shadows and wind-effects, and was curious if it was either.
 

Northern Light

Superstar
Member Bio
Joined
May 20, 2007
Messages
23,143
Reaction score
58,711
I’m sorry - I was using my phone, made a typo, and didn’t do a once-over.

I was asking what the planning rationale for tower separation distances was. I could only think of two things: shadows and wind-effects, and was curious if it was either.

Here's the answer, directly from the Guidelines:

1645117059261.png


1645117082671.png


1645117104318.png


One more bit, cause its a good summary of Planning's views:

1645117165079.png


There's more discussion and diagrams in the Guidelines.

Those can be found here: https://www.toronto.ca/wp-content/u...lanning-tall-buildings-may2013-final-AODA.pdf

This discussion starts on p.51
 

C-mac

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
May 5, 2021
Messages
807
Reaction score
1,139
The rendering makes the area look amazing. Hope I'm still alive to see it come to fruition.
 

Vanalla

New Member
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 12, 2018
Messages
94
Reaction score
279
The Timber House is a wonderful design. Am I the only one who thought of Iroquois Haudenosaunee architecture? Especially with the timber frame design choices?

I'm really hoping the developers can leverage that to get this built, if anything for some positive representation. Hopefully the notion was brought forward and can be further executed by Six Nations members. I'm still learning about these cultures but this could be an exciting way to incorporate their themes into more 'mainstream' Canadian culture!
 

TheSix

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Nov 2, 2016
Messages
625
Reaction score
2,054
I have agree. It seems like non of these spectacular renderings ever come to fruition.
I'm actually on the other side of the fence.

There will be a tremendous amount of pressure for WTO and the city to pull this off. Not only because of the international sh*tshow that was Sidewalk Labs, but Quayside will also be seen as the gateway to the West Don and an opportunity to connect the "islands" of Bayside, Distillery and Canary to the city.

Will it be as exciting as the renders, probably not – but it will likely be a step up from Bayside's star players (the Timber T3 Bayside, Aquabella and Aqualuna). And a step up from these buildings will be a HUGE win for Toronto as they are arguably some of the best current and future builds the city has seen in a century - and holds their own internationally.

Also, look to neighbouring Monde's strategy – the building is butt-up against the highway, so the developer strategically invested in an elevated architecture to help drive desirability. With most of Quayside against the Gardiner, we'll likely see this strategy being leveraged to the east.

I really think there's a lot to be excited about and IMO, this block and the surrounding neighbourhood is the most promising area of the city.

But hey, I'm also a helpless optimist at times. Unless we're looking to buildings like Time and Space ;)
 

Top