DavidCapizzano

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15 Storey mixed use building. Rentals in the back with offices in the front. Offices to be located in a restored old building which is currently hiding behind a bunch of siding. Architect is KNYMH

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Source: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamilt...ects-1.3819141
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From a February 2021 article in the Hamilton Spec:


A historic downtown Hamilton building hidden under brown cladding that’s lamented as an eyesore will make way for a modern condo.

“I’m sure all of Hamilton is familiar with this site. It’s the city’s most distinctive decorative siding.”

That’s how Coun. John-Paul Danko introduced 206-208 King St. W. to the city’s planning committee Tuesday.

The 13-storey condo that rises at the site of the former Hamilton Store Fixtures at the corner of Caroline Street North won’t sport its ironically celebrated brown cladding.

But developer King Stuart Developments Inc. plans to use bricks on the first four floors of the 123-unit building in homage to the one it replaces.

Of 37 vehicle parking spots, 36 will be in a 12-bay “stacker system” with movable platforms. There will be 123 bike spaces.

Farr said the building’s vehicle spaces might not be enough but noted developer Vrancor is providing a 500-spot parking facility as part of its nearby projects that residents could use.

But there are “really zero on-street” parking options, he said.

Franz Kloibhofer, a planning consultant for King Stuart, noted the project is targeting students or young professionals who won’t own cars.

The design calls for a fifth-floor terrace and two rooftop patios. The ground floor will be commercial space.

A review found the Hamilton Store Fixtures building was not structurally sound and couldn’t be restored to its original condition, which led to a recommendation that it be demolished, a staff report noted.

The building has also “been so disguised by the metal cladding” that its “original design and character are no longer apparent,” the report stated.

But original beams, joints, masonry, floorboards and tiles “should be salvaged and incorporated” into the future residential building’s common areas to commemorate its commercial history.

From the article:

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HAMILTON, ONT.—Canlight Realty Corporation has announced plans for a 14-storey residential highrise to rise at 206 King St. W. at the corner of Caroline Street in Hamilton.

Canlight, the developer behind the Pigott Building in Hamilton, is positioning the Radio Arts project as a link to the former CHIQ radio building on the site, stated a recent release. Radio Arts will have a four-storey podium paying homage to the original 1908 building design in its masonry details and arched windows. Other features include ground-floor retail, a fitness studio and coworking lounge. Rising above the podium, the black and white cladded residential tower will have staggered balconies.

“Ever since my work on the Pigott Building, I have been fascinated by the home-grown creative energy and entrepreneurial spirit that is reshaping Hamilton,” stated Vernon Shaw, president of Canlight, in a statement. “I’ve always loved the eclectic architectural charm of downtown Hamilton, so when it came to Radio Arts, I wanted to make sure it reflected the unique fabric of downtown, while also recognizing Hamilton’s renaissance of youthful, creative energy.”

Hunter Milborne has been brought on as the design and development team. KNYMH Inc. and Baudit Interior Design are other consultants.

Other heritage components will include an original tile floor of the former broadcasting station with tile that spells out Radio Arts, original beams and metal barn-style doors.


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Overall Hamilton developers sure love inundating the heart of its downtown core with boring builds which do no justice to its core which is in transformation mode.

With this particular build it's looking like quite the juxtaposition: the podium levels are quite striking and would really blend well to the King/Caroline intersection, while the tower itself looks pretty uninspiring.
 
Overall Hamilton developers sure love inundating the heart of its downtown core with boring builds which do no justice to its core which is in transformation mode.

With this particular build it's looking like quite the juxtaposition: the podium levels are quite striking and would really blend well to the King/Caroline intersection, while the tower itself looks pretty uninspiring.
Prices are still too low for them to really do anything creative. Prices are half they are in Toronto more or less but construction costs are basically equal. Land costs are a lot lower as well, but that difference has to get made up somewhere, and that comes through cheaper buildings.
 

Zoning approvals are in place. Shaw hopes to have site-plan approval by the end of the summer so construction can begin to meet an autumn 2024 target completion date.

When completed, Radio Arts will have 122 units with an average size of nearly 600 square feet. The plan is for a mix of studio, one-bedroom, one-bedroom-plus-den, two-bedroom and three-bedroom configurations. There will be ground-floor retail space that will likely include a coffee shop.
 

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