Benito

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Today.
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fanoftoronto

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Look how tiny the doorway is compared with the entire wall!!

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Though this doorway doesn't really match the arch plans for this floor. The plans show it centred on that wall. Maybe I'm confusing something else for the doorway here.
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Also to note, that opening on the east and west sides of the the 2 elevator pits are supposed to be fully filled with concrete! It's simply insane amounts of reinforced concrete in this building!
 

AlvinofDiaspar

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Look how tiny the doorway is compared with the entire wall!!

View attachment 349668

Though this doorway doesn't really match the arch plans for this floor. The plans show it centred on that wall. Maybe I'm confusing something else for the doorway here.
View attachment 349669

Also to note, that opening on the east and west sides of the the 2 elevator pits are supposed to be fully filled with concrete! It's simply insane amounts of reinforced concrete in this building!

I don't think the opening in the form is reflective of the actual size and exact location of the door - you can get a much better sense of those from where the rebars were placed. Look at this image by @Benito this past Wednesday:


The opening is exactly where it should have been, and of a size that is broadly the same just by eyeballing.

AoD
 

Victor1

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Can someone explain to me why tying all that rebar together, undoubtedly massive amounts of man-hours to do so, is more economic than using just steel beams? In NYC most of the new skyscrapers seem to be steel beam construction. The transfer slab here in particular was insane amounts of rebar, all tied together and seemed to take forever. Couldn't steel beams have been used there instead of the rebar and concrete and done much, much faster?
 

UtakataNoAnnex

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Look how tiny the doorway is compared with the entire wall!!
It's for the Alice in Wonderland mezzanine...

Can someone explain to me why tying all that rebar together, undoubtedly massive amounts of man-hours to do so, is more economic than using just steel beams?
...rebar tartan.

I'm sure more helpful explanations will be forthcoming though. 😼
 

Anthonylipson1996

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The tower is designed to resist loads through its mega columns and shear walls that are designed for the use of rebar. Filling out the concrete with as much reinforcement as possible is essential as this is the main source handling the tower’s load. Also the tower is designed to limit stress on the lower portion and requires this amount of reinforcement.
 
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