evandyk

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Yeah, I don't think anyone "requires" sunlight, but it definitely is a benefit for most of the year in Toronto (particularly considering schools aren't open during most of the time it's not a benefit).

That said, I think that sunlight and shadowing is a totally overblown consideration in planning approvals.
 

interchange42

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I've removed posts where things are getting too personal, while leaving a couple above that are already getting there but which at least still address the sunlight issue. If people want to continue to discuss the sunlight issue, great, but please pull back from the personal jibes, or, you know, holiday time!!!

42
 

Bjays92

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Ok continuing the shadowing discussion. I've looked at the shadowing diagram and unless I'm mistaken or looking at it wrong the increased shadowing is very minimal almost negligible. It's only for a very short amount of time at a very specific time of year.

On top of that, as someone who plays sports, I gotta say I vastly prefer schoolyards which are shaded/shadowed to ones that are in bright sunlight. We cannot get the necessary amount of vitamin D purely from sunlight anyway so I don't buy that argument personally, I really don't understand how it's a big deal.
 

DirectionNorth

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Ok continuing the shadowing discussion. I've looked at the shadowing diagram and unless I'm mistaken or looking at it wrong the increased shadowing is very minimal almost negligible. It's only for a very short amount of time at a very specific time of year.
I'm in favor of increased development - just pointing out that this height increase doesn't exactly have many benefits (unrelated to shadowing, it's a tangent I got caught up in, LOL).
On top of that, as someone who plays sports, I gotta say I vastly prefer schoolyards which are shaded/shadowed to ones that are in bright sunlight. We cannot get the necessary amount of vitamin D purely from sunlight anyway so I don't buy that argument personally, I really don't understand how it's a big deal.
In the summer, maybe. In the winter, sun is more pleasant (remembering that kids have to go outside during recess, unless something has changed), since kids are inside most of the time these days.
 

fanoftoronto

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Night shot!
PXL_20211013_233701047.jpg
 

Bjays92

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I'm in favor of increased development - just pointing out that this height increase doesn't exactly have many benefits (unrelated to shadowing, it's a tangent I got caught up in, LOL).

In the summer, maybe. In the winter, sun is more pleasant (remembering that kids have to go outside during recess, unless something has changed), since kids are inside most of the time these days.
Ok but is the height increase actually shadowing the park in the winter? This is the part that is unclear to me. From what I could tell it is not (please correct me if I'm wrong)

I don't necessarily disagree with the argument but if it's not applicable here than it's kinda pointless which I guess is what I'm sorta getting at. Regardless of how you feel on the shadow side of things how much of a real tangible effect is the increased height having here because I really thought it was negligible from the diagrams I saw.
 

zang

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Ok but is the height increase actually shadowing the park in the winter? This is the part that is unclear to me. From what I could tell it is not (please correct me if I'm wrong)

I don't necessarily disagree with the argument but if it's not applicable here than it's kinda pointless which I guess is what I'm sorta getting at. Regardless of how you feel on the shadow side of things how much of a real tangible effect is the increased height having here because I really thought it was negligible from the diagrams I saw.
Due to the Earth's tilt, the sun is lower in the sky during the winter, meaning the shadowing doesn't really become an issue for the park during the summer, but as fall comes and the sun is further south in the sky, that shadow will pass over the park from the West end to the East. The same for the spring (which is why the studies are March/October). Make no mistake, come December 21st, the building's shadow will fully pass over the school and structures further North (combined and overlapped with much shorter buildings in the area, too). There will be periods during the school year, during school hours where that increase will make a difference though. We also can't take The One out of the context of the increased lack of sunlight after all the other existing and proposed construction in the area (Four Seasons, 1200 Bay, etc.).

But most of all, let's not forget that we've already been through this with The One. Height was already reduced, and now they're going against what they've already agreed to. They're not taking away sunlight for affordable housing, they're doing it to sell more luxury condos to rich people. In turn affecting a public school with a catchment area that encompasses students across all income groups.
 
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evandyk

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Not exactly a playground, but there's pretty extensive amenities on top of Wellesley Station:

My first apartment in Toronto had one of the balconies overlooking that deck. I've even been in that pool. I'm surprised it didn't come to mind, but it's been a while now.
 

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