Northern Light

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Love the brick coursing patterns on the southwestern podium - will be nice to see the rest of those panels go up! And they used a common brick bond pattern for the podiums of the wellington street buildings - nice touch.

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I'm curious how these precast brick panels hold up over the long term. From my memory they are a more recent phenomenon, so I can't think of any buildings that are 10, 15 or so years old to see how they weather. By the looks of the panel edges they are stained or painted, so I imagine the colour will fade over time.

This development's efforts on the the brick are far superior to those at 299 Campbell.

That said, as is often the case with the brick veneer panels, the way in which they have visible seams is a concern.

If left that way, it's an aesthetic detractor; if filled in with a bit of mortar/grout, the irregular size of the gap will still be noticeable.

I'd be concerned about water-channeling effects as well.

****

I can think of a few ways the idea can be played with and work a bit better.

This heritage building on Yonge shows some techniques with its real (non-veneer) brick that could be applied in modern panels and better conceal seams.

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whatever

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There's sometimes a push to enclose certain sections of a building before the winter, but it's usually not necessary. The bigger weather concerns for glazing are wind and moisture. It doesn't take a lot of wind to make hoisting dangerous, and any surfaces to be caulked need to be basically perfectly dry (so rain and frost are problematic). For small sections of caulking you can use heat guns or tiger torches to dry things out (depending on how it'll affect the surface finishes), but it's usually easier just to shut things down if there's a steady rain going on.
 

karledice

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There's sometimes a push to enclose certain sections of a building before the winter, but it's usually not necessary. The bigger weather concerns for glazing are wind and moisture. It doesn't take a lot of wind to make hoisting dangerous, and any surfaces to be caulked need to be basically perfectly dry (so rain and frost are problematic). For small sections of caulking you can use heat guns or tiger torches to dry things out (depending on how it'll affect the surface finishes), but it's usually easier just to shut things down if there's a steady rain going on.
So knowledgeable
 

emphur

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Toronto
1 alarm fire (level 1 stands for working fire response, many units are specified being on hand) - Outside Storage facility (from the city's live feed) as of now.

Likely improper storage. Hopefully only minor damage. Weird amount of issues around this site lately, but being how complex it is I could see these issues popping up.
 
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