News   GLOBAL  |  Apr 02, 2020
 5.8K     0 
News   GLOBAL  |  Apr 01, 2020
 29K     0 
News   GLOBAL  |  Apr 01, 2020
 2.8K     0 

67Cup

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Nov 27, 2011
Messages
759
Reaction score
1,103
I think that is a Great Egret in the foreground of this photo. I have seen one in previous years but this is the first sighting of this season. I have never seen a pair of these, however. On the other hand, my favourite winter visitors, buffleheads, have obviously flown north.

E5DFC0FA-173A-46F6-AC66-F20FE245EAB3.jpeg
 

Northern Light

Superstar
Member Bio
Joined
May 20, 2007
Messages
20,334
Reaction score
48,414
I think that is a Great Egret in the foreground of this photo. I have seen one in previous years but this is the first sighting of this season. I have never seen a pair of these, however. On the other hand, my favourite winter visitors, buffleheads, have obviously flown north.

View attachment 315382

Looks like a Black Bill on the bird.

Not really consistent w/Great Egret.

Perhaps a Snowy Egret?

Difficult to know w/o seeing leg colour and feet colour.
 

67Cup

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Nov 27, 2011
Messages
759
Reaction score
1,103
Looks like a Black Bill on the bird.

Not really consistent w/Great Egret.

Perhaps a Snowy Egret?

Difficult to know w/o seeing leg colour and feet colour.

You can’t see it from this angle but the bill was actually yellow. I have the Audubon Society app on my cell and because of that specifically checked the bill. I also think the neck was too long for a snowy egret. I am no expert by any means so I may we’ll be mistaken.
 

67Cup

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Nov 27, 2011
Messages
759
Reaction score
1,103
There is a considerable ”bevy” of swans wintering in Humber Bay Park. I’ve seen as many as 21 at a time. Most of them appear to me to be Mute Swans which are a flourishing import from Europe. I am no expert birder, but I understand they are easy to recognize by the prominent black knob on the bill below the eyes.

The swans in the closer shot appear to me to be Trumpeter Swans which are native to North America. They appear to me more elegant, not having the knob on the bill. Another North American species that lacks the knob is the Tundra Swan but it frequently has a yellow spot below the eye, which these ones all lack.

Note: These two shots were on different days.

06053904-CFFF-4FC8-B784-89B6F1616AFE.jpeg
854F40B8-41E9-4962-A992-E0FA5F0299B8.jpeg
 

Northern Light

Superstar
Member Bio
Joined
May 20, 2007
Messages
20,334
Reaction score
48,414
”Mute“ swans, I believe, though that is not really an accurate description. These are a successful import from Europe

View attachment 383205

Those are indeed Mute Swans. (orange bill is the giveaway)

However, 'successful' is a matter of perspective, as they are considered 'invasive' and are taking over habitat at the expense of native swans.

 

67Cup

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Nov 27, 2011
Messages
759
Reaction score
1,103
Those are indeed Mute Swans. (orange bill is the giveaway)

However, 'successful' is a matter of perspective, as they are considered 'invasive' and are taking over habitat at the expense of native swans.



Good point, though Iwas using the word “successful” from the swans’ point of view, as it were. They have multiplied and flourished, though likely to the detriment of native species, just as you say. My own completely non-expert observation is that they considerably outnumber the native Trumpeter swans in the little niche of wetlands I see.
 

67Cup

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Nov 27, 2011
Messages
759
Reaction score
1,103
Not a shot of wildlife directly but this looks like beaver activity to me. The shots are from the walkway along the cove with the marinas, west of Mimico Creek. I talked with a jogger who runs the route daily and he believes the activity is very recent, as seems to be confirmed by the fresh appearance of the cuts and toothmarks. I don’t know where the beaver lodge is located but will keep my eyes open for one.
308F7B95-8884-4C06-8042-0A2683B5FD0A.jpeg
1461BB24-A8F0-4C4D-9C93-26064AAF4A31.jpeg
3A91429B-67D9-4196-8790-AD2F2B2E2B63.jpeg
 

67Cup

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Nov 27, 2011
Messages
759
Reaction score
1,103
I think this is a mink, beside a pond in Humber Bay Shores Park East. I certainly stand to be corrected, however.

In another walk past the same pond (no photos, sorry) I saw a small group of Red Breasted Mergansers fishing. In a brief span, three of them were successful and nabbed small, wiggling tidbits. Then a large salmonid, with brightly coloured speckles near the dorsal fin, perhaps 60-70 cm long, swam by. A Steelhead, perhaps? Perhaps all this says something moderately encouraging about the local ecosystem in the park.

7F6FBF39-8B0A-483D-B6A1-25DBAA894090.jpeg
98E389B7-CB93-48CC-9E79-76805A3634B2.jpeg
 
Last edited:

SubHuman

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Jan 23, 2016
Messages
257
Reaction score
172
City:
Toronto
A construction worker on the job at a pond in Humber Bay Shores Park
I went to High Park this morning with visiting relatives and saw one casually swimming past on the pond with a stick in its mouth. Maybe they're a little more common and less nocturnal than I had thought.
Grndr_pnd_bvr.jpeg

Those are indeed Mute Swans. (orange bill is the giveaway)

However, 'successful' is a matter of perspective, as they are considered 'invasive' and are taking over habitat at the expense of native swans.

One was on the edge of the pond, not overly concerned with all the people walking on the nearby path.
swan.jpeg

Relating to other invasive/introduced birds, and the barn swallow structures mentioned in the Ontario Place thread, unsurprisingly there were only House Sparrows on the birdhouse in High Park, not the intended Purple Martins.
High_Park_birdhouse.JPG
High_Park_birdhouse_sign.JPG

Other than maybe constantly removing the sparrow nests, I'm not sure what could be done to keep them away. Apparently it's somewhat common in the U.S. for people to trap and "dispatch" (😲) them, though I've not heard of that being encouraged in Canada, and I don't know if it would even be legal here.
Also important to note that not all sparrows are House Sparrows. Just on the way out of the park I saw some of these smaller and different-looking ones, I think Chipping Sparrows.
Chipping_Sparrow3.jpeg
Chipping_Sparrow4.jpeg
 
Last edited:

Top