UtakataNoAnnex

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Mar 5, 2020
Messages
4,299
Reaction score
6,051
I would beg to differ, I know a couple of the big wigs are fundamentally changing how they plan projects specifically due to Covid- these are projects with shovels not hitting the ground for 3-5 years.
While I suspect there's a few developers that will likely take this pandemic into consideration when it comes to marketing on potential buyers' fears, I am not sure the science of this is behind their plans.
 

zang

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Jun 6, 2013
Messages
2,199
Reaction score
2,781
In 50+ years we'll probably have very different expectations of what an ideal street (and street grid) should be: generation alpha/beta won't have the same attachment to cars as previous generations. With luck, Allen Road (as a freeway structure) will be gone too aside from basic 401 ramps
Interesting to consider then that the Allen Rd. "valley" could potentially be the longest cut-and-cover operation in world transit history. ;)
 

Northern Light

Superstar
Member Bio
Joined
May 20, 2007
Messages
22,158
Reaction score
55,046
Interview w/Oxford noting the push to vertical, Yorkdale is highlighted but Square One and STC also mentioned.

 

turini2

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Aug 20, 2020
Messages
444
Reaction score
1,658
Those towers look awfully close to the 24/7 noise and pollution of the 401 - surprised there's not a push to have some use at lower levels that would buffer residential uses there / demand for a buffer use.

For example, this scheme in Greenwich in London, has a car park to serve the adjacent IKEA store at lower levels across the site with residential courtyard amenity space at podium level - and massive screens to a 4 storey height to block noise/pollution from the busy A102 road that leads to the Blackwall Tunnel. Furthermore, the layout of apartments facing the main road probably won't have balconies or opening windows facing the road - they'll be L shaped. Or you have the staircases/elevators/entrance corridors on the very end of the building.

design_image_one.jpg


Also, there should be a "mid block" pedestrian bridge - if you could even call the Allen Expwy a block - a connections to/from the massive Downsview Park development will go a long way to making this neighbourhood feel more cohesive. And yes, I expect the big box stores south of Wilson Ave and north of the 401 to become mixed use sooner rather than later, especially with the height restrictions removed!
 

Northern Light

Superstar
Member Bio
Joined
May 20, 2007
Messages
22,158
Reaction score
55,046
There is an excellent front-page write-up by Julian Mirabelli discussing this proposals turn before the Design Review Panel.

I won't replicate Julian's words here, he's done a fine job expressing things in a concise manner; a worthwhile read:

 

mjl08

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 13, 2008
Messages
3,707
Reaction score
1,997
Looks good. Still, I wouldn’t support taller towers than those proposed until they commit to a good traffic plan in the area. It is currently a disaster. Yorkdale is also a popular staging ground for street racing on the weekends.
 

Don Coyote

New Member
Member Bio
Joined
Jan 13, 2022
Messages
41
Reaction score
74
I think this makes sense. Anywhere a mall resides with large swaths of parking should be transformed into a mixed community.

I'd add even more density here but yeah, maybe infrastructure is not up to par for more.
 

Banana78

New Member
Member Bio
Joined
Jul 16, 2019
Messages
30
Reaction score
204
Those towers look awfully close to the 24/7 noise and pollution of the 401 - surprised there's not a push to have some use at lower levels that would buffer residential uses there / demand for a buffer use.

For example, this scheme in Greenwich in London, has a car park to serve the adjacent IKEA store at lower levels across the site with residential courtyard amenity space at podium level - and massive screens to a 4 storey height to block noise/pollution from the busy A102 road that leads to the Blackwall Tunnel. Furthermore, the layout of apartments facing the main road probably won't have balconies or opening windows facing the road - they'll be L shaped. Or you have the staircases/elevators/entrance corridors on the very end of the building.

View attachment 360803

Also, there should be a "mid block" pedestrian bridge - if you could even call the Allen Expwy a block - a connections to/from the massive Downsview Park development will go a long way to making this neighbourhood feel more cohesive. And yes, I expect the big box stores south of Wilson Ave and north of the 401 to become mixed use sooner rather than later, especially with the height restrictions removed!
I agree with your comment here. A mid block pedestrian bridge over the Allen expressway to the east side. What I like is parking moving underground in the development, hoping there will be free parking spots for shoppers. Also hoping the building height restrictions be lifted in the future.
 

interchange42

Administrator
Staff member
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 23, 2007
Messages
26,187
Reaction score
31,428
City:
Toronto
I agree with your comment here. A mid block pedestrian bridge over the Allen expressway to the east side. What I like is parking moving underground in the development, hoping there will be free parking spots for shoppers. Also hoping the building height restrictions be lifted in the future.
Regarding the Allen, tunnelling under it would make way more sense — you'd have to go so high to get over what's already an elevated highway that it would not likely make any sense... but in regards to any new infrastructure over the Allen or the 401 to other communities, I doubt you'd get Oxford to pay for it. As mentioned above, there are likely a pile of other social services that will be needed onsite, and the City will likely be pushing for those to be funded first.

42
 

DrillBit

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Nov 18, 2019
Messages
103
Reaction score
112
Those towers look awfully close to the 24/7 noise and pollution of the 401 - surprised there's not a push to have some use at lower levels that would buffer residential uses there / demand for a buffer use.

For example, this scheme in Greenwich in London, has a car park to serve the adjacent IKEA store at lower levels across the site with residential courtyard amenity space at podium level - and massive screens to a 4 storey height to block noise/pollution from the busy A102 road that leads to the Blackwall Tunnel. Furthermore, the layout of apartments facing the main road probably won't have balconies or opening windows facing the road - they'll be L shaped. Or you have the staircases/elevators/entrance corridors on the very end of the building.

View attachment 360803

Also, there should be a "mid block" pedestrian bridge - if you could even call the Allen Expwy a block - a connections to/from the massive Downsview Park development will go a long way to making this neighbourhood feel more cohesive. And yes, I expect the big box stores south of Wilson Ave and north of the 401 to become mixed use sooner rather than later, especially with the height restrictions removed!
The 1-st phase is the farthest from Hwy 401. By the time they start phase 4, most cars will be electric.
Less noise, and much less pollution.
 

picard102

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Sep 21, 2009
Messages
2,127
Reaction score
854
Looks good. Still, I wouldn’t support taller towers than those proposed until they commit to a good traffic plan in the area. It is currently a disaster. Yorkdale is also a popular staging ground for street racing on the weekends.
If the parking lots are now buildings, there isn't much incentive for street racers to gather.
 

turini2

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Aug 20, 2020
Messages
444
Reaction score
1,658
The 1-st phase is the farthest from Hwy 401. By the time they start phase 4, most cars will be electric.
Less noise, and much less pollution.
Combustion engines haven't been banned (yet!). Also - road noise from tyres is still noisy, and they'll still be some particulate pollution from tyres/brakes. Not an excuse for developers to build super close to highways.
 

innsertnamehere

Superstar
Member Bio
Joined
Mar 8, 2010
Messages
17,511
Reaction score
17,155
City:
Toronto
The 401 will always be noisy from tire and wind noise, yes. It'll also be a lot, lot quieter than it is today, and a lot less smog-inducing. Particularly as large trucks are electrified.

Tire particulate doesn't waft into the air to the same extent that exhaust does from my understanding, it's more of a water runoff issue entering stormwater flows.

Anyone who has ever stood over a freeway overpass knows how loud highways are, especially when vehicles are operating at full speed (i.e. not in traffic). The 407 produces a mind-numbing level of noise, for example. Luckily the 401 is almost always congested which will make it a lot quieter with EVs!
 

sixrings

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Aug 19, 2009
Messages
5,095
Reaction score
2,453
Combustion engines haven't been banned (yet!). Also - road noise from tyres is still noisy, and they'll still be some particulate pollution from tyres/brakes. Not an excuse for developers to build super close to highways.
No one is forcing anyone to buy here. Yet I’m sure people will line up to just as they did at Yonge and sheppard, bayview and sheppard, and all downtown beside the gardener. Not only will people line up to buy these but they will be sold at a premium. If rich people are too dumb to figure out this isn’t a good idea then that’s on them. They have money for consultants but being close to the subway, mall and highway is going to win the debate.
 

Top