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slapped_chicken

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This is interesting given that the highest ridership year for Line 2 is 535K PPD in 2014.

What's also interesting is that ridership levels are only 23K PPHPD during the peak hours on Line 2...Given how insanely difficult it can be getting on a train during rush hours on Line 2, perhaps it's time we rethink what ridership level is deemed appropriate for a subway line in this city.

Line 1 is also serving 850k PPD. There is more daily ridership on that single line than the entire systems of DC or Chicago. Toronto seriously has one overcrowded and stretched-thin subway system. Line 2's ridership seems to be commonly overlooked but it's also one of the highest for a North American subway line. I believe a modern subway line with high capacity automated trains should be able to push up to 1000k PPD; but of course Line 2 isn't up to that standard. Could ATC installation + new trains (apparently, they are going with a newer train that isn't the TR for Line 2) reasonably accommodate ridership beyond 2050? Also, while they considered OL and Line 2 extension, did they consider riders using Line 5? I expect the western portion of Line 5 will offer substantial relief by intersecting with N-S bus routes that would normally feed into Line 2, and many riders north of Eg would opt for Line 5. In the east, the lines converge, and there's also slower surface-running so it may be a less attractive alternative.
 

innsertnamehere

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The Ontario Line will redistribute ridership loads on Line 2 as well as Line 1, which many forget. The Bloor-Danforth Line's busiest sections are the approach to Line 1 from the east and west- and the Ontario Line will pull ridership off the line right as it's hitting that "crowded" section.
 

Wm Perkins Bull

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The Ontario Line will redistribute ridership loads on Line 2 as well as Line 1, which many forget. The Bloor-Danforth Line's busiest sections are the approach to Line 1 from the east and west- and the Ontario Line will pull ridership off the line right as it's hitting that "crowded" section.
Do not count your chickens before they hatch, provincial governments have cancelled projects before.
 

WislaHD

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Unfortunately UT compresses the image, so see the pdf link above.

1605970266172.png
 

W. K. Lis

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Unfortunately UT compresses the image, so see the pdf link above.

View attachment 284140

COVID-19 will continue until the vaccines (plural) has been fully distributed, along with herd immunization. Which means until the end of 2021. After 2022, the demand will likely return. Some will continue to work from home, but don't forget about population growth.
 

nfitz

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The Ontario Line will redistribute ridership loads on Line 2 as well as Line 1, which many forget. The Bloor-Danforth Line's busiest sections are the approach to Line 1 from the east and west- and the Ontario Line will pull ridership off the line right as it's hitting that "crowded" section.
It will, though with no future changes other than the new signalling and trains, there's still opportunity to increase Line 2 frequencies and increase capacity. Perhaps more so than Line 1, as even with only 1 platform at Yonge, there isn't as much bottlenecking at AM peak (I'd guess that getting X passengers uniformly distributed along the train off, is faster than boarding!)

Is there a report somewhere that shows the loadings/boardings at AM peak from about Woodbine to Yonge? Sherbourne to Yonge is probably the peak, but I'm always surprised heading westbound at how many get off at Broadview and even Sherbourne and Pape. And lots of students getting off at Greenwood and Coxwell as well. It's a packed train leaving Woodbine, but somehow doesn't seem much more so, or leaving people behind, all the way to Yonge!
 

Allandale25

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Cross posted from the Brampton Transit thread.

 

wopchop

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It would be interesting to see ridership by station, and how that had changed.

Oakville GO for example appears very empty still of car commuters. The south lot is closed. The main lot maybe 25% full on a weekday. Same with the garage. The lot east of Trafalgar was closed all winter, not sure if it has reopened.
 

ssiguy2

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It will take longer for a commuter system like GO to recover its ridership and this is similar to what has happened in nearly every other city with their commuter rail systems.

Commuter rail is very much focused on getting people from the suburban homes to downtown offices. White collar work is, by far, the biggest candidate for working from home and hence a huge number of those trips are no longer needed. As GO slowly turns into a more suburban & rapid transit system, the percentage of riders strictly going from their suburban homes to Union will decrease as a proportion of trips provided. GO's recent complete fare integration/reduction and free 905 transfer will greatly expediate this process.
 

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