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drum118

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You better get shots of this overpass ASP, as it will not look the same by year end.

The current east end stair will be removed with a new one leading out onto the RailPath. The wooden decking walkway is to be replace so material doesn't fall onto Metrolinx Weston Sub Corridor.

Its possible that Metrolinx will install mesh fencing so material and people can fall onto the soon electrification corridor.
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ShonTron

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I really wish that no ugly mesh fencing goes up like it did at the bridge at CityPlace. Ruins any photographic opportunities, and is, in my view, completely unnecessary. It's never really been a problem in Toronto, and there are many other bridges, like Bathurst and Spadina, that are open to pedestrians yet not given the same treatment.
 

drum118

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I really wish that no ugly mesh fencing goes up like it did at the bridge at CityPlace. Ruins any photographic opportunities, and is, in my view, completely unnecessary. It's never really been a problem in Toronto, and there are many other bridges, like Bathurst and Spadina, that are open to pedestrians yet not given the same treatment.
Totally agree, but all bridges are to have this mesh according to Metrolinx.

Even in the US, bridges over electrification have this mesh as well from the few I have seen.

The New John Street bridge has this mesh and no idea if it is open yet.

I should note its possible that the bridge will be close for sometime as they replace the decking. This will require longer walking trips.
 

vic

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Shakycam footage from a couple of weeks ago:
<iframe width="560" height="315" src="
" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 

drum118

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What I saw on Nov 18, I don't see this bridge being done by Dec 16.

They have place construction fencing along the bridge railing. A set of stairs installed between the mid level to the lower level. A frame for the new level to the new stair is on site waiting to be install.
 

W. K. Lis

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It's too bad they went with the lowest possible cost with this bridge. Instead of going with a spiral ramp so that bicyclists and walkers would have an easier time.

 

steveintoronto

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I really wish that no ugly mesh fencing goes up like it did at the bridge at CityPlace. Ruins any photographic opportunities, and is, in my view, completely unnecessary. It's never really been a problem in Toronto, and there are many other bridges, like Bathurst and Spadina, that are open to pedestrians yet not given the same treatment.
I've crossed the Bridge Over Troubled Train Tracks many times, and never consciously realized the mesh Shon mentions, but found this pic which clearly shows it. I see what you mean:
20121026-bridge-2.jpg

(Derek Flack)

web-sr-prop-bridge3.JPG

(Della Rollins for the Globe and Mail)

web-sr-prop-bridge5.JPG

(Della Rollins for the Globe and Mail)

web-sr-prop-bridge1.JPG

(Della Rollins for the Globe and Mail)

That is pretty awful. Perhaps they had extra material left over from Maplehurst Correctional Complex? Perhaps it's to collect pollution and blacken with age to give it a genuine industrial grit in no time flat?

I can understand the need for security from throwing or thrown objects in either direction, but after spending what they have for that structure? *Surely* they can find something less garish (and garish is too mild a word) for the finer meshing?

Even in the US, bridges over electrification have this mesh as well from the few I have seen.
I've just been looking a number more over pending electrification routes, none of them seem as garish as this. I'm going to take a closer look at it next time I'm down there, as compared to the Weston John St Bridge, it's a magnitude of ugly greater:

[...][I had thought that there was rather too much fencing Up close, though, it
works: the fencing is attractive stainless wire. It looks great.] (Pic by Adam Norman)
[...]
http://www.westonweb.ca/tag/john-street-bridge/

Now I view the rise rate and unbroken flight of steps as seen in this pic at John Street, I'd have to say there's a distinct possibility this doesn't meet design code:
[The steps are actually kind of fun; on the John Street side, they are steeply pitched. My kids loved it, and they were actually a bit scared. The auditorium staircase, with much larger steps, is pretty great too.]
"My kids loved it, and they were actually a bit scared." They should be....that pitch and lack of landings is awful accidents waiting to happen. Add a bit of ice, and bingo. That is actually a concern on the Wallace Ave bridge too. It's one thing to go down a couple of steps in an accident, go down them all and chances are you'll never be the same. The City assuming liability is one of the issues that kept the bridge from opening.

2016-10-29-12.09.51-e1477775976515-225x300.jpg

(Adam Norman)
 
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drum118

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All bridges I have seen in the US and Europe going over electrify RR lines have a mesh type fence. City Place bridge was the first for Toronto to use mesh. John St is the 2nd and both gives you no clear shot of the rail corridor and have a larger opening than the ones I have seen in the past elsewhere. City place is in line to what I have seen outside of Canada.

As for the stairs, keep forgetting to measure Bloor station stair as they don't look nor when you walk on the platforms ones meet code. Have yet to try John, but don't look code. Stairs are to have 7.75 inches rise max with 5 inches min; 8.25 inches min from nose to noes to a max of 14. Those of us that have size 10 and plus larger shoe, the min nose distance of 8.25 is too narrow. Any stairs I have been involved with over the years, have use 7.75 x 10 with an 1.5-2 inch over hang for the nose to the back of the step or known as a 8:12 step.
 

interchange42

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I'm not sure how the term 'garish' applies to the mesh on the CityPlace bridge. It's a relentless orthogonal grid of dull gray metal.

Metrolinx were originally pushing to chain link on that bridge, and the designers went looking for something else that would fit the bill without looking quite a cheap and nasty as chain link. That orthogonal gird mesh was eventually sourced from South Africa, IIRC, and while it may do the job that Metrolinx/GO demanded, it's certainly no aesthetic achievement.

If we are going to end up with more bridges with a mesh on them, here's hoping that something else can be found, or at the least, that the surface can be treated in a way to improve the experience. If the CityPlace bridge builders had known in advance that the mesh was going to be required, then maybe sufficient budget could have been found to powder coat the mesh the same colour as (or a complementary colour to) the bridge structure. Now we know that these pedestrian bridges are going to have a mesh required on them, we need to demand that the design include some mitigation to make the mesh less oppressive.

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steveintoronto

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I'm not sure how the term 'garish' applies to the mesh on the CityPlace bridge. It's a relentless orthogonal grid of dull gray metal.
I use it in the older English context...as per "rough and inappropriate".

If we are going to end up with more bridges with a mesh on them, here's hoping that something else can be found, or at the least, that the surface can be treated in a way to improve the experience. If the CityPlace bridge builders had known in advance that the mesh was going to be required, then maybe sufficient budget could have been found to powder coat the mesh the same colour as (or a complementary colour to) the bridge structure. Now we know that these pedestrian bridges are going to have a mesh required on them, we need to demand that the design include some mitigation to make the mesh less oppressive.

If it's stainless steel, the patina can be enhanced to make it retain the lustre and colour. If it isn't (and it looks dark and oxidized like plain steel) then it could at least be nickel plated, or as you state, powder coated. I find it difficult to believe that the designers were aware of how that mesh was to be applied in the way it was. The choice of light yellow for the structure only exacerbates the contrast to it.
 

interchange42

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The designers of the CityPlace bridge weren't told that mesh was going to be required at all until late in the game, when the budget was already set and the structure was being manufactured.

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steveintoronto

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The designers of the CityPlace bridge weren't told that mesh was going to be required at all until late in the game, when the budget was already set and the structure was being manufactured.

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That appears obvious, as had I been party to designing that structure, I would have been very upset. It reeks of tasteless afterthought. Had the mesh been part of the original design requirement, doubtless something far more fitting would have been chosen, and the positioning of the mesh too. I have to question whether there's now an unintended danger to cyclists or runners brushing past that? Whether that's a woven lattice or a stamping is hard to tell without actually examining it. Both have to be finished properly to dull sharp edges and burrs.

A quick Google search shows the use of similar if not same meshing to highlight architectural form, ironically in some rail stations in Europe. I've only one link left from searching, must run, but an example can be found here:
http://www.cisc-icca.ca/getmedia/c9f8bf6e-217c-46a8-b8e0-0b59c2cc9dd8/IC33-_lores.aspx

In electronic and industrial equipment now, for ventilation purposes as well as looks, mesh is back in vogue for visual effect. Metrolinx really dropped the ball on this one.

Quick Edit to Add:

Take a close look at where the mesh has been cut at ends, this appears to be a stamped, laser cut or flat welded material, and those ends should have a finished wrap-around edge-binding for safety as well as looks:

web-sr-prop-bridge3.JPG

(Della Rollins for the Globe and Mail)
 
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steveintoronto

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ADRM: I'm late, (I think everyone is today anyway with the weather) but was intrigued with what you'd posted, and explored the Amgen Helix Pedestrian Bridge you posted to find out about the construction materials. I note it crosses many railway tracks, perhaps electrified, and therefor might meet US FRA regs, I'll delve on that later, but here's what I found was being used in some areas of construction, and it might be an answer for Metrolinx (Electric conductivity might be a requirement, will delve that later when time permits):

Why Tensioned Membrane Structures?
Rapid-The_EN_Blue-44-%28MAIN-HEADER-PHOTO%29_0.jpg

There are many great advantages and functional benefits of tensile architecture and here are just a few reasons why:
  • Flexible Design Aesthetics - Tensile fabric structures provide virtually unlimited designs of distinctive elegant forms that can be realized because of the unique flexible characteristics of membrane, resulting in an iconic and unique structure or feature for any building owner, city or even region.
  • Outstanding Translucency - In daylight, fabric membrane translucency offers soft diffused, naturally lit spaces reducing the interior lighting costs while at night, artificial lighting creates an ambient exterior luminescence.
  • Excellent Durability - With several different membranes in the market place such as PTFE fiberglass, ETFE film, PVC and ePTFE, the durability and longevity of tensile membrane structures have been proven and built in climates ranging from the frigid artic to the scorching desert heat.
  • Lightweight Nature - The lightweight nature of membrane is a cost effective solution that requires less structural steel to support the roof compared to conventional building materials, enabling long spans of column-free space.
  • Low Maintenance - Tension fabric structures are somewhat unique in that they require minimal maintenance when compared to an equivalent-sized conventional building.
  • Cost Benefits - Most tensile membrane structures have high sun reflectivity and low absorption of sunlight, resulting in less energy used within a building and ultimately reducing electrical energy costs.
  • Code Compliance - Depending on the type of membrane and overall project design, tensile membrane systems appropriately meet the various associated building code requirements.
  • Variety of Membranes - Whether it’s a permanent durable structure that needs to last longer than 30 years, an insulated membrane system for thermal performance or a deployable flexible application, there are a variety of tensile membranes to choose from to meet specific performances for your next building project.
  • Sustainable Building Material - By using translucent tensile fabric membranes like PTFE, PVC, Insulated Tensile Membrane or transparent ETFE films, daylight is maximized in building interiors, thus reducing the costs for electric lighting. Structurally, Birdair’s steel and cable designs also involve fewer components than traditional roofing systems, ultimately saving expenses on material costs and lower fuel consumption for shipment.
http://www.birdair.com/projects/amgen-helix-pedestrian-bridge

A synthetic material of this type might be very apt, engineering requirements besides. I'll delve on that later. Conductivity can be added to synthetics if need be in many cases.
 
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