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Should the LCBO be deregulated?


  • Total voters
    169
  • Poll closed .
I hope so!

Paywall free: https://archive.is/LiXjL

We’d need to sort out bottle returns. I’d support a system like we have in New Brunswick, where you take your bottles and cans to a dedicated deposit return centre. While we’re at it, put a deposit on all fast food cups.
As long as we provide options for people without cars. Return centres need to be in walkable neighbourhoods, not just places people need to drive or take a bus to. A two-tier system is not the answer.
 
As long as we provide options for people without cars. Return centres need to be in walkable neighbourhoods, not just places people need to drive or take a bus to. A two-tier system is not the answer.
Not just for alcoholic, soft drinks, and other beverage containers, but other items such as light bulbs, batteries, and "hazardous" items.
 
I remember when i was a little kid in the US, 30 years ago, taking my empty soda cans/bottles and feeding them to the bottle return machines at the grocery stores. Most of the modern world has empty container return machines and deposits on all containers. Ontario is still living in the stone age when it comes to recycling. So many of our plastic bottles and cans end up in the landfill.

Last time i took my empties back to the beer store was over the summer, I saw more people in line returning empties than buying beer.
 
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Not just for alcoholic, soft drinks, and other beverage containers, but other items such as light bulbs, batteries, and "hazardous" items.
The storage, handling and training requirements for HHW doesn't lend itself to multiple neighbourhood locations. Incandescent light bulbs re recyclable because there is no market for the glass.
 
Not just for alcoholic, soft drinks, and other beverage containers, but other items such as light bulbs, batteries, and "hazardous" items.
By "hazardous" items, I would have such "recycling" depots handle do-it-yourself oil (from DIY oil changes), oil filters, used tires, used cooking oils, left over paints, empty aerosol cans, etc.

Items that change a deposit, such as beer and wine (and soft drink?) containers would get a refund. In Europe, they use machines that collect, count, and issue a deposit receipt to be used in the stores next to it.

 
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By "hazardous" items, I would have such "recycling" depots handle do-it-yourself oil (from DIY oil changes), oil filters, used tires, used cooking oils, left over paints, empty aerosol cans, etc.

Items that change a deposit, such as beer and wine (and soft drink?) containers would get a refund. In Europe, they use machines that collect, count, and issue a deposit receipt to be used in the stores next to it.

FYI. You can bring these things to the City of Toronto depots free of charge already.
 
FYI. You can bring these things to the City of Toronto depots free of charge already.
How many people actually know they can? How many people even know where they are located, or where on the internet to search?

Wouldn't a more "local" location be better? Especially, it you don't use a car or pickup.
 
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There are something like seven of them for the entire city, none of which are reasonably accessible without a car.
And certainly not for one off trips. I had about 100 used AA/AAA batteries I have saved up over the past six years, but even those only took up about half of one plastic storage container. I wasn't going to make a special trip anywhere to get rid of what fits in a little bag in the closet.

I lucked out this week when my apartment building had a temporary battery disposal box set up, so I dumped them all in there. Amazingly, of course, like with recycling, the "batteries only" box was filled with all manner of other junk, including other electronics, cables, and regular garbage and even takeout containers, so the management said they may have to just landfill all of it as they aren't going to sort through trash because people were too lazy and stupid to properly dispose of things.
 
There are something like seven of them for the entire city, none of which are reasonably accessible without a car.
There's also Toronto's Toxic Taxi: call 311 or use the online form and they come to pickup. We've done that to get rid of a few cans of old paint.
 
The announcement on formally moving to allow the sale of beer in corner stores and ending 'The Beer Store's' retail monopoly is apparently coming towards the end of the week ahead.


Not clear about the impact on wine at the time, it appears 'The Beer Store' may retain its distribution monopoly.
 
The presser on 'modernizing alcohol sales' will come Thursday.

CBC Toronto has a story with potentially (unconfirmed) additional details:


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It sounds as though LCBO and The Beer Store may retain their distribution monopolies.

There are also, apparently, unspecified changes to alcohol taxation coming.
 
RTDS as in flavoured Malt Beverages? or actual vodka sodas?

Example: LCBO has cottage springs (vodka) and Beer Store has cottage springs (malt based)... flavour is different! (lots of US RTDs are malt based vs vodka).
 
RTDS as in flavoured Malt Beverages? or actual vodka sodas?

Example: LCBO has cottage springs (vodka) and Beer Store has cottage springs (malt based)... flavour is different! (lots of US RTDs are malt based vs vodka).

They mean anything that is a mixed drink with comparatively low ABV (comparable to beer).
 
The presser on 'modernizing alcohol sales' will come Thursday.

CBC Toronto has a story with potentially (unconfirmed) additional details:


View attachment 526538
It sounds as though LCBO and The Beer Store may retain their distribution monopolies.

There are also, apparently, unspecified changes to alcohol taxation coming.
Fascinating! 24 hour access to a variety of booze - where was this when I was a strapping young buck in search of debauchery??
 

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