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I wish I knew what the economics were for the city to double 747 frequencies all day (forget LRT extension or a bus non-stop to downtown). From the times I've taken it, the demand is there.
 
I wish I knew what the economics were for the city to double 747 frequencies all day (forget LRT extension or a bus non-stop to downtown). From the times I've taken it, the demand is there.
I'd be happy seeing this service expanded with hopes of convincing the city the need towards an LRT expansion to the Airport.
 
I wish I knew what the economics were for the city to double 747 frequencies all day (forget LRT extension or a bus non-stop to downtown). From the times I've taken it, the demand is there.

I imagine this is a common experience.

Screenshot_20240406-180205_Samsung Internet.jpg
 
I'd be happy seeing this service expanded with hopes of convincing the city the need towards an LRT expansion to the Airport.
Yes, I think the city is not yet realizing the demand is there. I was disappointed they did not add bus service to downtown from the airport, I think that will lead to even more pressure on the existing 747 service.
 
I forget that for all the legitimate complaints we have about ETS and public transit in Edmonton, it's insane that American cities are hellscapes in comparison to us.
Agreed. Yes we have to always demand better but It doesn’t hurt to consider we could be living in *insert American metro of 1-1.5 mil*
 
It's nice to see our Alberta systems stand out, but with that said I still think ETS and Edmonton has to strive to do better.

The US systems are a low-hanging fruit, too. Canadians often compare themselves to the US to make themselves feel better, when the reality is that in a lot of metrics, they're still in second-last place among developed countries, with the way things are here only being better compared to the US. You see this with healthcare, education, sustainability, politics, etc. Yes, Edmonton's transit compares favourably to practically any American city of 1.5 mil, but it doesn't compare favourably to practically any European or East Asian city of 1.5 mil, though it's a similar-ish quality to Oceanian cities in the same ballpark.
 
The US systems are a low-hanging fruit, too. Canadians often compare themselves to the US to make themselves feel better, when the reality is that in a lot of metrics, they're still in second-last place among developed countries, with the way things are here only being better compared to the US. You see this with healthcare, education, sustainability, politics, etc. Yes, Edmonton's transit compares favourably to practically any American city of 1.5 mil, but it doesn't compare favourably to practically any European or East Asian city of 1.5 mil, though it's a similar-ish quality to Oceanian cities in the same ballpark.
What is the point of comparing Edmonton to European or Asian cities? There is no comparison they are old established cities that grew for the most part in the age of the railways where Edmonton grew during the age of the automobile with low density housing and all the infrastructure associated with it. It is futile and pointless exercise to try and make that comparison.
 
What is the point of comparing Edmonton to European or Asian cities? There is no comparison they are old established cities that grew for the most part in the age of the railways where Edmonton grew during the age of the automobile with low density housing and all the infrastructure associated with it. It is futile and pointless exercise to try and make that comparison.

You could argue the same for many Eastern North American cities.
 

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