I was hoping for density more in line with Canary Wharf in London. Will density be high enough to one day support subway or will this always be an LRT neighbourhood?
 
The assumption is that those projects (or projects of similar density) will eventually be realized.
 
Given Toronto's history these last three decades or so, it might be risky to make such an assumption. How long have we been talking about the relief line now? Years - decades, even. Are we still debating "revenue tools" while the city grows like a weed and its roads and subways are becoming all but unusable? Yes, we are still debating. How many studies have been conducted with little in the way of concrete results? Too many.

Sure, we're building out our public transit. But it's occurring very slowly and the funding for some pretty major capital projects remains sheer conjecture. Tory's plans for a toll on DVP and Gardiner have been completely derailed by Kathleen Wynne. Back to square one there, too. We're still stuck at the "who's gonna pay for it?" hurdle.
 
Worth noting that both the Don River naturalization and the Relief Line are in the midst of multi-hundred million dollar planning phases to undercut the (admittedly not unwarranted) cynicism.

I think there's a decent chance the feds decide to fund a good portion of the actual capital costs of for one or both of those projects in their next round of infrastructure spending, as well.

And, for the province's part, if it's timing that is the most important thing to you, Wynne's cancellation of Tory's road toll proposal will mean the city gets funding more quickly than it would have under Tory's scheme.
 
And, for the province's part, if it's timing that is the most important thing to you, Wynne's cancellation of Tory's road toll proposal will mean the city gets funding more quickly than it would have under Tory's scheme.

Isn't the replacement funding dependent on the Liberals getting back into power?
 
How long have we been talking about the relief line now?

Some talk yes but never anything concrete. There was never a major push to get it done until now. There's real money now being spent to design it. Hopefully the next election won't put it back on the shelf for decades to come.
 
I was hoping for density more in line with Canary Wharf in London. Will density be high enough to one day support subway or will this always be an LRT neighbourhood?
Building a subway there would be an underwater project, not normally cost-effective. Water table is only a metre or so down.
 
I'm a bit confused about the name of this project now -- if Cherry St. is being realigned further west. then is this project still on Cherry St.? Is there a massive green space setback between this building and the new Cherry St.? It's almost enough to put another small building between them from what I've seen.
 

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