Msleylar

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Oct 23, 2018
Messages
153
Reaction score
265
Not to derail the thread but it is an interesting topic indeed. I won't get too much into the specifics, but I was once tasked with conducting a study/analysis on the policies surrounding cemeteries and their potential as a planned land use for greenspace preservation. Interesting thought project that never really went anywhere other than a report that got filed away somewhere though.
 

HousingNowTO

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Sep 16, 2020
Messages
948
Reaction score
2,445
City:
Toronto
Note, I am not advocating development of this or any other cemetery.

I'm just intrigued by the difference in social attitudes over time.
Agreed. DEATH was a much more "day-to-day experience" in people's lives before the 1940's - and the major changes in medicine and large-scale institutional healthcare after WW2. Today, DEATH it is much more "out of sight - out of mind" for people... and it has changed our cultural-relationship(s) with it...
 

Northern Light

Superstar
Member Bio
Joined
May 20, 2007
Messages
23,266
Reaction score
59,092
Preliminary Report on this one to the Nov 24th meeting of TEYCC.

Report here: https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2021/te/bgrd/backgroundfile-172779.pdf

From said report:

1636592659083.png
 

AlbertC

Superstar
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 25, 2007
Messages
19,806
Reaction score
48,767
City:
Toronto


1390-1406 Yonge Street and 1420 Yonge Street - Notice of Intention to Designate a Property under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act

Summary
This report recommends that City Council state its intention to designate the properties at 1390-1406 Yonge Street and 1420 Yonge Street, under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act under the following criteria: design, associative, and contextual value (1390-1406 Yonge Street); and design, associative, and contextual value (1420 Yonge Street).

Located on the west side of Yonge Street just south of St. Clair Avenue within the Deer Park neighbourhood, the properties at 1390-1406 Yonge Street contain six, 3-storey main street commercial row buildings constructed together in 1932 – originally as a collection of eleven which once spanned south to 1378 Yonge Street. The row was built in the Spanish Colonial Revival style and maintains several of its original details, the most prominent being its terracotta roof and yellow- and rug-brick facade.

To the immediate north of 1390-1406 Yonge Street, and separated by a driveway entry into St. Michael's Cemetery, the adjacent 1420 Yonge Street contains a complete block of four, 2-storey main street commercial row buildings constructed together in 1932. Commissioned and continuously owned by the Cira family until the property was sold in 2021, 1420 Yonge Street has been a presence within the Deer Park neighbourhood for nearly a century. The block was designed by architect Benjamin Swartz (1899-1961),
an architect of note within the Jewish community who designed several landmarks including the Kiever Synagogue (1923) in Kensington Market. Similar to a pair of 4-storey apartment blocks Swartz built for the Cira family on the south side of
St. Clair Avenue West (at Robina Avenue) in 1928, the commercial row at 1420 Yonge Street features a mix of Art Nouveau and Art Deco elements.

The properties at 1390-1406 Yonge Street and 1420 Yonge Street contribute architecturally, historically, and contextually to the eclectic mix of early 20th-century main street commercial properties that characterize the historic midtown Toronto streetscape of Yonge Street.

Heritage Planning Staff have completed the Research and Evaluation Report for the properties at 1390-1406 Yonge Street and 1420 Yonge Street and determined that they meet Ontario Regulation 9/06, the criteria prescribed for municipal designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act under the following criteria: design, associative, and contextual value (1390-1406 Yonge Street); and design, associative, and contextual value (1420 Yonge Street). As such, the above properties represent a significant built heritage resource.

On July 16, 2021, an Official Plan and Zoning By-law Amendment - 1406 Yonge Street was submitted to the City to permit a 40-storey mixed-use building with commercial at grade containing 406 dwellings. On October 7, 2021 a Site Plan Control application for a 39-storey mixed-use building having a non-residential gross floor area of 157.9 square metres, and a residential gross floor area of 28,287 square meters containing 406 residential dwellings came under review. The properties at 1406-1428 Yonge Street are included in the application. The proposal involves the removal of the northernmost, end-unit (1406) of the 3-storey mixed-use main street commercial row at 1390-1406 Yonge Street and demolition of the 2-storey mixed-use main street commercial row at 1420 Yonge Street.

In June 2019, the More Homes, More Choice Act, 2019 (Bill 108) received Royal Assent. Schedule 11 of this Act included amendments to the Ontario Heritage Act. The Bill 108 Amendments to the Ontario Heritage Act came into force on July 1, 2021, which included a shift in Part IV designations related to certain Planning Act applications. Section 29(1.2) of the Ontario Heritage Act now restricts City Council's ability to give notice of its intention to designate a property under the Act to within 90 days after the City Clerk gives notice of a complete application.

The City Clerk issued a complete application notice on September 24, 2021. On December 16, 2021, the applicant provided a waiver to City Planning extending the
90 day timeline until April 30, 2022. As such, the Notice of Intention to Designate report must be considered by City Council at its meeting on April 6/7, 2022. As this is an urgent matter, the Chief Planner and Executive Director of City Planning Division will provide a staff report directly to City Council immediately following the Toronto Preservation Board meeting.

A Heritage Impact Assessment (HIA) is required for all development applications that affect listed and designated properties and will be considered when determining how a heritage property is to be conserved. Designation also enables City Council to review proposed alterations or demolitions to the property and enforce heritage property standards and maintenance.

A HIA was provided with the development application. Staff have reviewed the HIA and will provide further comments to the applicant pending the outcome of Council’s decision.​
 

Art Tsai

Administrator
Staff member
Member Bio
Joined
Feb 1, 2021
Messages
918
Reaction score
2,958
New renderings are updated in the database! The overall project information changed from 39 storeys to 40 storeys. The total building height changed from 131.25m to 139.99m. The total unit count increased from 406 units to 419 units. Finally, the total parking spaces were reduced from 24 parking spaces to 0 parking spaces.

The rendering was taken from the architectural plan via rezoning application:

PLN - Renderings or Perspective Drawings - APR 8  2022-1.jpg


PLN - Renderings or Perspective Drawings - APR 8  2022-4.jpg


PLN - Renderings or Perspective Drawings - APR 8  2022-5.jpg


PLN - Renderings or Perspective Drawings - APR 8  2022-3.jpg


PLN - Renderings or Perspective Drawings - APR 8  2022-2.jpg
 

Northern Light

Superstar
Member Bio
Joined
May 20, 2007
Messages
23,266
Reaction score
59,092
1653687431637.png
New renderings are updated in the database! The overall project information changed from 39 storeys to 40 storeys. The total building height changed from 131.25m to 139.99m. The total unit count increased from 406 units to 419 units. Finally, the total parking spaces were reduced from 24 parking spaces to 0 parking spaces.

The rendering was taken from the architectural plan via rezoning application:

View attachment 402840

View attachment 402843

View attachment 402844

View attachment 402842

View attachment 402841
'
The renders betray a very significant change that Art did not mention..........

The ground-level/podium treatment has been radically altered to preserve the heritage facade.


1653687340683.png
1653687473136.png


Overall, an improvement.
 

interchange42

Administrator
Staff member
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 23, 2007
Messages
26,402
Reaction score
32,261
City:
Toronto
This somehow grew 10 storeys (154m now) and went up to 542 units (still with 4 elevators because of course)...huh?
Also, the cantilever at the 18th storey is now a more significant one as the lower floors have shed some square footage for greater separation distance I suppose.

42
 

Art Tsai

Administrator
Staff member
Member Bio
Joined
Feb 1, 2021
Messages
918
Reaction score
2,958
New rendering updated to the database. The overall storey count changed from 40 stories to 50 storeys. Total height changed from 139.99m to 154.90m. Lastly, the total unit count changed from 419 units to 542 units.

Rendering taken from the architectural plan via Site Plan Approval:

PLN - Architectural Plans - NOV 17  2022-3.jpg
 

Top