I expect the service will be phased out before that happens; replaced by a people mover extension and the Malton stop.

7 to 10 minute frequencies is a far more interesting question. IIRC, it's just a rolling stock order rather than station/track modifications.
Another theoretical scenario is fleet commonality.

The elephant in the room is election 2018.

Is the public ready to swallow electrification of UPX?

This is the first EA-complete route AND the most controversial service ("That airport train boondoggle", as many still say, alas) is already head of line. I'm definitely cheerleading for electrification, but I can see the worries on the wall...

They need to toot massively increased ridership, and try to market UPX sufficient enough in order to break the 10,000 average -- A five figure number are always a nicer boast for any public transit line. Win over the electorate, and succeed in beginning to electrify GO.

So, my vision is they HAVE to rebrand UPX slightly for a more palatable GO electrification begin.

They may try to rebrand it (ala SmartTrack or a renamed GO RER service) as a 2018 ploy.

As one possible option of many, it's technologically feasible to merge SmartTrack + GO RER + UPX into a unified EMU. When Metrolinx orders EMU (possibly Stadler KISS), they can order some models that can do both high/low floor doors -- just like the Caltrain order. So that a 3-coach or 4-coach Stadler KISS consist can service both UPX and GO platforms.
-- The midlevels would have the baggage racks, and accessible seating.
-- The upper/lower passenger seating levels would be for regular seating.
-- The trains can shorten to 3 or 4 coach for UPX stations
-- The trains can be reallocated elsewhere on GO even as part of a 12-coach consist (only low-level doors open)

8wCe3io.png


83661

Look ma, high doors! For UPX stations!

This allows compatibility with both RER, SmartTrack & UPX simultaneously.

Most EMUs that GO orders would be low-door only.
But a few EMU sets would have both levels, in order to service UPX stations.

This specific trainset is available in low-door-only config (GORER compatible) & dual-level door config (GORER+UPX compatible); Metrolinx could order both -- and order only enough dual-level to completely satisfy UPX demand, plus a few extras for total fleet flexibility.

Boarding speed of a bilevel is compensated by slightly longer dwell made available by EMU's quicker acceleration ability (Despite being bilevel, the KISS EMU can accelerate slightly faster than UPX -- 4kph/second acceleration rate -- and without overheating).

It would be only one 3-coach or 4-coach consist that services (slightly modified) UPX stations, but the UPX-compatible consists can just join into a regular GO train at other times when not in use. Which means GO can afford to purchase a few extra UPX-compatible EMU's and run unused UPX consists as part of regular GO trains (leaving high doors unused when servicing low platforms). Bilevel + 4-coach would massively increase the passenger capacity of UPX stations too.

The Georgetown corridor is capable of allowing 7.5 minute service interspersing the Bramalea-Unionville (formerly SmartTrack) service with the Union-Pearson (formerly UPX) service. The trains of the merged UPX+SmartTrack+GORER would look exactly the same (except for the appearance of high doors on the Pearson trains). The different final destinations will be displayed on info-displays ("Pearson" vs "Bramalea") at stations and onboard the train. So people commuting Union-Bloor-Weston gets 7.5 minute service, and people commuting either Union-Pearson or Union-Bramalea would get 15 minute service.

This could go a long way of allaying the fears of alienating 2018 electorate of "Why electrify that UPX boondoggle" if it's merged UPX+GORER+SmartTrack in one EMU train.

This might end up becoming necessary if they want GO electrification to survive election 2018 without the UPX first-mover "EA already done, it's first" black cloud hovering above it.

....and fleet efficiency for the win!

Only a small section of the RER EMU fleet would need to be dual height, just enough trainsets to handle UPX spur service. 7.5 minutes thru Weston/Eglinton, 15 mins beyond Pearson spur, 15 mins to Pearson, etc. While double decker isn't ideal, the majority of the boardings and alightings are at the terminuses rather than centres, so it would be acceptable in this situation. See my post about how UPX and RER might be merged, using 4-coach Stadler KISS trainsets with the dual-door-height option.
 
From Season 2 of A Handmaid's Tale

handmaids tale upx.jpg

Check out this map!


handmaids tale upx 2.jpg

Don't mess with this fare officer!
(also, if you look closely on the luggage rack there are French instructions. That's a blooper in my books!)

handmaids tale upx 3.jpg

Check out this map! Also, you can see Pearson in the background!
 

Attachments

  • handmaids tale upx.jpg
    handmaids tale upx.jpg
    68 KB · Views: 414
  • handmaids tale upx 2.jpg
    handmaids tale upx 2.jpg
    64.5 KB · Views: 374
  • handmaids tale upx 3.jpg
    handmaids tale upx 3.jpg
    80.7 KB · Views: 367
That transit map looks a lot better than the real thing, I bet it got built without decades of circuitous debate.

Dystopia? Bring it on.

- Paul
 
What are you smoking? I have been to Boston and love their system. How is the TTC far superior?

The MBTA is awful... Literally the only thing it has going for it is wide coverage but it's as filthy as the MTA, breaks down more often than the TTC and the frequencies are terrible. Plus horrifying construction costs and delays for even fairly minor projects like the Green Line extension. The MBTA is actually the system I use as an example when I tell people the TTC isn't the worst in North America lol...
 
What are you smoking? I have been to Boston and love their system. How is the TTC far superior?
Almost missed my flight because I had to wait over 30 minutes for a silver line bus to the airport, and then it took 30 minutes to go 5km. This line is on their rapid transit map as a joke or something.

Train frequencies can be as low as 20 minutes at night. The green line is slow and overcrowded. I could go on and on.
 
What are you smoking? I have been to Boston and love their system. How is the TTC far superior?

I don't think you realize how great the TTC actually is, especially considering their budget. We have 4 lines, 76km of subway track, coverage to every major point in the city, and trains every 2 minutes on two main lines, and less than 6 at least all day, every day. New trains are set to be placed on the last two lines within the next 10 years, and even then, the T1s are some of the best subway trains ever built in North America.

That's just the subway: we have the best streetcar network in the Americas, with frequencies rivaling that of the subway, space for hundreds of people, and new rolling stock being rolled out as we argue. The network is also going to be expanded, with even more vehicles and new routes.

What about the buses? Name one city with dozens of bus routes that have frequencies of better than every 5 minutes during peak times. I'd love to hear an answer.


Yes, the TTC has budget and operating shortfalls, but they pale in comparison to the actual state of the system. It's relatively clean, the fastest way to get downtown and almost anywhere along the reaches of the subway, it has excellent frequencies (when traffic doesn't screw with the buses), most operators are extremely considerate, transfers are a breeze anywhere (Fare paid bus and streetcar terminals at almost every station), etc. The problems with the system are a result of the negligence of the people of Toronto and politicians they elect. If you are unwilling to raise your taxes or your fare a significant amount for SOGR and to build relief projects like the RL, Crosstown, FWLRT, Scarborough transit projects, and fund streetcar expansion, then you are part of the problem and have no right to bitch about the state of the TTC.
 
The MBTA is awful... Literally the only thing it has going for it is wide coverage but it's as filthy as the MTA, breaks down more often than the TTC and the frequencies are terrible. Plus horrifying construction costs and delays for even fairly minor projects like the Green Line extension. The MBTA is actually the system I use as an example when I tell people the TTC isn't the worst in North America lol...

The only thing I care about is the one thing the MTBA has going for it, wide coverage. I can get just about anywhere with one of their trains, and then switch to a bus for the last mile. Can't say that about the TTC.

Almost missed my flight because I had to wait over 30 minutes for a silver line bus to the airport, and then it took 30 minutes to go 5km. This line is on their rapid transit map as a joke or something.

Train frequencies can be as low as 20 minutes at night. The green line is slow and overcrowded. I could go on and on.

Should have taken the Blue line. Then get off at Airport station, then taken the shuttles.

The green line is bad because of a few things:
1) it is 3 branches.
2) it is streetcars, but sometimes underground. (Soon we will experience that joy, aka Crosstown)
3) It is the oldest line in the city, dating back to 1897.

I don't think you realize how great the TTC actually is, especially considering their budget. We have 4 lines, 76km of subway track, coverage to every major point in the city, and trains every 2 minutes on two main lines, and less than 6 at least all day, every day. New trains are set to be placed on the last two lines within the next 10 years, and even then, the T1s are some of the best subway trains ever built in North America.

That's just the subway: we have the best streetcar network in the Americas, with frequencies rivaling that of the subway, space for hundreds of people, and new rolling stock being rolled out as we argue. The network is also going to be expanded, with even more vehicles and new routes.

What about the buses? Name one city with dozens of bus routes that have frequencies of better than every 5 minutes during peak times. I'd love to hear an answer.

Yes, the TTC has budget and operating shortfalls, but they pale in comparison to the actual state of the system. It's relatively clean, the fastest way to get downtown and almost anywhere along the reaches of the subway, it has excellent frequencies (when traffic doesn't screw with the buses), most operators are extremely considerate, transfers are a breeze anywhere (Fare paid bus and streetcar terminals at almost every station), etc. The problems with the system are a result of the negligence of the people of Toronto and politicians they elect. If you are unwilling to raise your taxes or your fare a significant amount for SOGR and to build relief projects like the RL, Crosstown, FWLRT, Scarborough transit projects, and fund streetcar expansion, then you are part of the problem and have no right to bitch about the state of the TTC.

I will ignore buses, as many places have a vast network of buses. I only care about trains.

Except for the Green line, in Boston, their is no extreme overcrowding like there is on the TTC.

Try going midday from somewhere in the GTA to midtown Toronto. Let's say Milton.... No trains will get you there. Not true in Boston.

If we really want to compare cites, I would rank the TTC second to Montreal's. I would then say that Montreal is better than Boston, except for the lengths of lines.

TTC Subways: 76.9km
TTC streetcars: 83km
GO train: 453km

Montreal Metro: 69.2km
RTM: 256.4km

MBTA Subway: 126 km
MBTA Commuter Rail: 541 km

The difference between the TTC and the MBTA is that the TTC is downtown heavy with their streetcars all downtown, and there is only really 2 branches of one line. The MBTA has all 4 lines including all 3 branches of the the Green ending downtown. In Downtown Boston, you need not walk too far to get a Subway that can move you well underground and out of the traffic. Look at the Streetcars in downtown Toronto at rush hour.

Toronto is not bad, but as far as convenience, it still lacks. When the DRL long opens, then, maybe things will be better.
 

Back
Top