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freshcutgrass

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I would consider dumping skyscrapercenter for skyscraperpage. Skyscraperpage's data is more extensive than Emporis.

Jeez...that brings back memories.

I remember starting the Toronto highrise count as a result of one of those legendary Toronto vs Chicago battles on Skyscaperpage about 18 or so years ago. It was an on foot block-by-block count to beat the Chicago numbers....there was no database. Toronto's 500 footer count was pathetic...only 10. Now look at it.
 

maestro

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Chicago and the rest of the world have done very well for themselves too. The hot 500 list would be next to impossible to maintain now.
 

DonValleyRainbow

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Stats. You guys like stats? I frickin love stats. Stat tables have now been added to a second sheet.

oy0Apuk.png

As I write this post:
  • 201/271 (71%) of all buildings on the list in Wards 27, 28 and 20 (downtown core). Another 31/271 (11.4%) are in Wards 6 and 22 (mostly Humber Bay/Yonge and Eg areas)
  • About half (49.8%) of the buildings are completed or topped out. Another 41 (15.1%) are under construction, and the remaining 95 (35.1%) are still proposed.
  • 11/127 (8.7%) completed buildings are >=210m, but there are 27/95 proposals (28.4%) above that height
  • Toronto only has 6 proposed buildings falling into CTBUH's category of "supertall" (>300m)
 

DonValleyRainbow

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Added another stat table today. All completed buildings on the list are now displayed by height range and 5-year period.

mCl4Hpi.png


Can really see the void of tower development in the period after the 1990's recession, and then after amalgamation.
 

DonValleyRainbow

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Okay. I now have a map.

2ZfSawA.png


It has been added to the first post. It is not directly linked to the actual 120m list because I had to employ a workaround; therefore it will have to be updated periodically, so I have added a date in the description. Nonetheless it exists!

Note that 'topped' is part of 'completed' because laziness.
 

freshcutgrass

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Added another stat table today. All completed buildings on the list are now displayed by height range and 5-year period.

mCl4Hpi.png


Can really see the void of tower development in the period after the 1990's recession, and then after amalgamation.

Totals are incorrect.

Don't know if amalgamation would have much to do with influencing highrise construction, but the drought of 1995-2004 perfectly coincides with Mike Harris's scorched earth approach as premier.
 

WislaHD

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Totals are incorrect.

Don't know if amalgamation would have much to do with influencing highrise construction, but the drought of 1995-2004 perfectly coincides with Mike Harris's scorched earth approach as premier.
Mike Harris' impact would have had influence years down the line, not while he was premier. To me, it looks more like a consequence of the recession.

Amalgamation forced Toronto to revisit its growth plans and zoning. Say whatever you want about amalgamation, but I am sure revisiting our growth plans post-amalgamation had an impact on attracting/concentrating highrise development.
 

DonValleyRainbow

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Mike Harris' impact would have had influence years down the line, not while he was premier. To me, it looks more like a consequence of the recession.

Amalgamation forced Toronto to revisit its growth plans and zoning. Say whatever you want about amalgamation, but I am sure revisiting our growth plans post-amalgamation had an impact on attracting/concentrating highrise development.

Well what I'm wondering is if amalgamation just created a glut of applications that needed to be considered while the megacity got itself sorted. Not trying to imply developers got nervous about it, just that projects got caught up in the pipe while the bureaucratic monster settles from upheaval.

Totals are incorrect.

Don't know if amalgamation would have much to do with influencing highrise construction, but the drought of 1995-2004 perfectly coincides with Mike Harris's scorched earth approach as premier.

ooof. I wonder if that changes things, maybe there is no gap. I'll get to work on a fix in a bit.
 

Edward Skira

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Well what I'm wondering is if amalgamation just created a glut of applications that needed to be considered while the megacity got itself sorted. Not trying to imply developers got nervous about it, just that projects got caught up in the pipe while the bureaucratic monster settles from upheaval.

Massive 80's boom led to a massive 90's bust. Little got proposed or built during the 90's. When UT started in 2002 a 20 storey proposal was a reason to celebrate. Mike Harris and amalgamation had nothing to do with it.
 

freshcutgrass

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Mike Harris' impact would have had influence years down the line, not while he was premier.
.

Plenty from day one (as well as long term)

Subways weren't just cancelled immediately, millions were wasted filling in holes. Amalgamation did not save money and downloading crippled the city's budget and devastated infrastructure both immediate and long term, and infrastructure is critical to development and progress. The city's planning and approvals departments were so underfunded that the backlogs were a joke, which continues to this day. It also introduced the Fords to the fray.

Lots of people hate Toronto, but nobody as much as Harris. The only difference is he was able to nearly kill the city. Harris is why I am not the biggest fan of democracy.
 

WislaHD

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Plenty from day one (as well as long term)

Subways weren't just cancelled immediately, millions were wasted filling in holes. Amalgamation did not save money and downloading crippled the city's budget and devastated infrastructure both immediate and long term, and infrastructure is critical to development and progress. The city's planning and approvals departments were so underfunded that the backlogs were a joke, which continues to this day. It also introduced the Fords to the fray.

Lots of people hate Toronto, but nobody as much as Harris. The only difference is he was able to nearly kill the city. Harris is why I am not the biggest fan of democracy.

I don't like Harris' reign as Premier either. He was the reason why I do not have a subway on my street already-built today, and the reason why my classroom sizes swelled to ~35 students per class growing up, among the other things you've described.

But I'd caution against taking a partisan view of history. You've described a correlation above, in regards to his Premiership and the number of buildings that were constructed during that time. That is not the same as causation. There are a myriad of factors at play that influence the peaks and troughs of a construction cycle, including economic and consumer performance/confidence, as well as societal attitudes towards development (regarding sprawl, commercial development in suburbs, decentralization from downtown). These are things that are way beyond the influence and tenure of Mike Harris, the same way the early 90's recession was beyond the influence of Bob Rae.
 

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