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This "person" is sssoooo delusional with conspiracy theories it made my head spin.......our version of Trump.....

This crazy b#@!h wants to make sure "they look at what research is being funded." Wtf?! What's it to her? Oh right, just in case research tells us that COVID was real and vaccinations do work. She doesn't believe in any of that, just like her rural supporters......
 
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Alberta Public Service bargaining: Minister Horner​

April 15, 2024 Media inquiries

President of Treasury Board and Minister of Finance Nate Horner issued the following statement on bargaining with the Alberta Union of Provincial Employees (AUPE).

“Public services support families and our thriving communities. Alberta’s government truly values public services and the professionalism and dedication of the people who deliver them.

“Recently, the union representing government employees, the Alberta Union of Provincial Employees, told the government that they are demanding a 26 per cent wage increase over the next three years. The AUPE claims that government employee wages have fallen behind.

“Albertans, and indeed all Canadians, have not seen a wage increase of this size. The Conference Board of Canada found most working Albertans received a salary increase between 2 and 3 per cent in 2023 and 2024.

“The Alberta government approaches bargaining and wages from an evidence-based perspective. To do this, we look at similar jobs across the country to determine fair market wages. Looking across Canada, we do not see any publicly funded employees receiving the type of settlement the AUPE is demanding. To that end, the Government of Alberta’s in-going offer of 7.5 per cent over four years is a reasonable position that keeps the Alberta Public Service wages competitive with public sectors in other jurisdictions.

“Given the union’s extreme wage positions, working towards a fair and reasonable settlement in a timely manner will be difficult. The Alberta government will not increase taxes or cut programs, services, or workers to give unprecedented salary increases that will result in pay well above market rates. Rather, we must balance our ability to invest in programs and services Albertans rely on with fair and competitive compensation for workers.”
 
7.5% over four years is ridiculously low-ball given the lengthy series of zeroes that the APS has received over their last two contracts, but AUPE is obviously shooting really high with 26.
 
She's got a long way to go as of 2024 I see they only have 110,000+ as a population.

Lethbridge isn't far behind Red Deer for population at 100,000+ and Airdrie is at 80,000+.
 
I honestly just don't see that happening for many decades....
Realistically, that ain't happening ever.

Populational growth in Canada is supposed to stagnate WAAAAY before that, and then some internal migration patterns might give a boos to some places here and there, but unlikely to make large shifts. On a RIDICULOUS 10%/year growth-rate it would take 22 years for them to reach 1M, at 7.5% (still ridiculous). 29 years and at 5% it would take 43 years (and 5% is still ridiculous as a 4 1/2 decades sustained rate). They might get to around 500k, at a 3% average growth rate over the next 40-45 years, which is something more realistic, but 1M? HAHAHAHAHA
 
Realistically, that ain't happening ever.

Populational growth in Canada is supposed to stagnate WAAAAY before that, and then some internal migration patterns might give a boos to some places here and there, but unlikely to make large shifts. On a RIDICULOUS 10%/year growth-rate it would take 22 years for them to reach 1M, at 7.5% (still ridiculous). 29 years and at 5% it would take 43 years (and 5% is still ridiculous as a 4 1/2 decades sustained rate). They might get to around 500k, at a 3% average growth rate over the next 40-45 years, which is something more realistic, but 1M? HAHAHAHAHA
Yeah my post was a nice way of saying that Red Deer realistically won't hit 1M people probably ever. Not only because of the demographic trends you just highlighted, but because being a province with two major cities will almost always ensure they will receive the bulk of incoming immigrants and interprovincial migrants.

I'm all for Alberta's towns and smaller cities getting population boosts - I want all places and regions here to thrive and grow, but we've also got to be realistic here. Red Deer should have realistic ambitions of being a city of 250,000 people. MAYBE 500,000 in 50 years but even that will likely be too large an undertaking.
 
Smith has before make unrealistic predictions about Alberta's future population growth. IMO this doesn't help her credibility, but many of her supporters don't seem to rigorously challenge anything she says even when its clearly ridiculous. Hopefully those that have to plan for the future don't take her too seriously.
 
Yeah my post was a nice way of saying that Red Deer realistically won't hit 1M people probably ever. Not only because of the demographic trends you just highlighted, but because being a province with two major cities will almost always ensure they will receive the bulk of incoming immigrants and interprovincial migrants.

I'm all for Alberta's towns and smaller cities getting population boosts - I want all places and regions here to thrive and grow, but we've also got to be realistic here. Red Deer should have realistic ambitions of being a city of 250,000 people. MAYBE 500,000 in 50 years but even that will likely be too large an undertaking.
I can see Lethbridge and Red Deer making it to 300~350k in 30-40 years, while Edmonton and Calgary CMAs will likely reach the 3-3.5M mark at their peak (AB population is predicted to peak at between 8.5 and 11M by around 2060, depending on the growth scenario you choose, with the medium growth being 10M)
 
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