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A shared toilet is not actually some new or unusual thing.
Every man will be peeing in shower, or the bathroom sink. And some women too.

pee-in-the-sink-jpg.15719
 
hmmm... what would actually happen if we tried this now, and who reversed this policy and why. should be if you want to invest in real estate go buy a @#$%! rental apartment building,land or a REIT lol..
Screenshot_20230203-043515.jpg
 
Or we could back to the old way of a developer buying land, servicing it then building a tract of homes (or a block of townhouses, whatever) and then selling them. I don't recall a lot of subdivisions and buildings built in the 50s, 60s and 70s going unsold. Much of the financing and risk has been shifted to the consumer.
 
40 years? That’s nuts.


Paywall free: https://archive.is/JRmxX

Presumably you’re in your mid 30s or early 40s when you buy a house, meaning you’re in your mid 70s to early 80s when you pay off the house? So, you’re essentially in debt for life. Doesn‘t allowing such long terms cause pricing inflation and contribute to possible bubbles? If the govt only allowed 25 year mortgages wouldn’t this limit prices, since the market only has so much money?

I’m in my 50s, I can’t imagine having a mortgage now, let alone after I retire. I’m focused on squirrelling away money for retirement, home repairs and vacations.
 
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What generally happens to single family detached properties around Yonge street new high rise buildings and on Sheppard as well? Do they usually appreciate or depreciate in value?
Is there a risk of getting into land assembly and hence people don't want to buy those properties?
 
Presumably you’re in your mid 30s or early 40s when you buy a house, meaning you’re in your mid 70s to early 80s when you pay off the house? So, you’re essentially in debt for life. Doesn‘t allowing such long terms cause pricing inflation and contribute to possible bubbles? If the govt only allowed 25 year mortgages wouldn’t this limit prices, since the market only has so much money?
To be fair, these long amortizations are because we're seeing historically high interest rates. There's about zero chance that interest rates will remain as they are for the next 40 years, and as interest rates go back to normal, so will amortizations.
 
To be fair, these long amortizations are because we're seeing historically high interest rates. There's about zero chance that interest rates will remain as they are for the next 40 years, and as interest rates go back to normal, so will amortizations.
Interest rates aren't historically high. They're quite low by historic standards. The last decade of almost free money was the exception, not the rule.
 
What generally happens to single family detached properties around Yonge street new high rise buildings and on Sheppard as well? Do they usually appreciate or depreciate in value?
Is there a risk of getting into land assembly and hence people don't want to buy those properties?
Anyone has done any calculation on this?
Or does everyone think there is no effect?
 
40 years? That’s nuts.


Paywall free: https://archive.is/JRmxX

Presumably you’re in your mid 30s or early 40s when you buy a house, meaning you’re in your mid 70s to early 80s when you pay off the house? So, you’re essentially in debt for life. Doesn‘t allowing such long terms cause pricing inflation and contribute to possible bubbles? If the govt only allowed 25 year mortgages wouldn’t this limit prices, since the market only has so much money?

I’m in my 50s, I can’t imagine having a mortgage now, let alone after I retire. I’m focused on squirrelling away money for retirement, home repairs and vacations.

My parents were both around 50 when they paid the house off 20 years ago. The house is now worth 1,9 million as of 2022. Crazy, it was built as a middle class starter home in the 1960s.
 

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