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In general, I prefer 2-way streets, as a pedestrian, as a cyclist, as a transit user and as a motorist.

I understand the desire for greater convenience in coming/going to a residence or business or for that matter a school or a park.

But I also think that needs to be tempered by competing needs for safety, for dedicated infra for cycling, and/or pedestrians, for beautification; as well, and the trade-offs need to be thought through and discussed reasonably on a case by case basis. But hyperbole, as seen above is simply unhelpful and unreasonable in the extreme.
There is of course so much more to Barcelona than the one way streets. It was so well planned to provide the central areas with cafes, benches, room to stroll etc. it could use some grass though!
 
A bunch of westerners came onto the St. Lawrence facebook groups to ask about the "nightmare" we had experienced when this happened.
There are, of course, people in all areas that are inconvenienced or confused when their regular routes need to change but it is significant, I think, that The Esplanade changes seemed to appeal to FAR more locals than those opposed - if the talk at SLNA meetings is any guide. Apart from those who like bike tracks, many note the reduction in car traffic and the speed of the vehicles on The Esplanade as VERY good things.
 
Dundas St East - very wide bike lane, literally same wide as car lane which is great. But we need a better separation from cars, concrete blocks like on Adelaide/Richmond would be better. Trees and plants would be even better. Video is here.
Cars often park in front of the Rabba at River to enjoy temporary "free" parking, despite the flexiposts. It's truly maddening.
 
Cars often park in front of the Rabba at River to enjoy temporary "free" parking, despite the flexiposts. It's truly maddening.

Send a note to staff. Suggest adding a mini-jersey barrier even if just for that one block.

I'm only eye-balling it, but it looks like there's room there to me.
 
I was the one who got the concrete barriers lower on River at King (where cars were doing the same to access Tim Horton's).

Your efforts are much appreciated; my thanks.

Does go to show, for others, that sometimes, asking is met with a receptive answer.
 
Well this is a (welcome) first:

IMG_1261.jpeg
 
In general, I prefer 2-way streets, as a pedestrian, as a cyclist, as a transit user and as a motorist.

I understand the desire for greater convenience in coming/going to a residence or business or for that matter a school or a park.

But I also think that needs to be tempered by competing needs for safety, for dedicated infra for cycling, and/or pedestrians, for beautification; as well, and the trade-offs need to be thought through and discussed reasonably on a case by case basis. But hyperbole, as seen above is simply unhelpful and unreasonable in the extreme.
It seems to me that one ways can provide narrower streets and narrower intersections as there is less provision required for turning lanes. It still requires a lot of care to ensure speeds are kept low.
 
How far east we talkin'? All the way to Church?

Scott or Church, both are being considered, If Scott is chosen there will be a cycling connection south to Esplanade.

Not sure about that with Church, its a complicated intersection.
 
Scott or Church, both are being considered, If Scott is chosen there will be a cycling connection south to Esplanade.

Not sure about that with Church, its a complicated intersection.
Also, with the changes proposed for the St Lawrence Centre and the possible creation of a 'cultural plaza' between it and Meridian it is (maybe) possible that the City will try closing Scott south of Front (to Scott Lane) as a test. Certainly nothing settled but it IS being thought about. I also doubt there is room for cycle track on Wellington between Yonge and Church with the newly completed redesign. I love cycle tracks but there are streets where they REALLY cannot be squeezed in.
 
Much clearer lane markings have finally been added to the new bike lane extension on Bloor from Runnymede west to Aberfoyle (near Islington) although it's not entirely finished yet. In some sections like the Kingsway area (Prince Edward to roughly Montgomery), concrete curbs and planters have already been installed for physical protection, which I wasn't expecting to see until December, so that's very positive. I even saw a meter maid ticketing cars who were still ignorantly parking next to the sidewalk where there were no physical barriers in place yet to prevent such! :D
 

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