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I wonder if the next bridge will be build in the style of Walterdale or Tawatina, with no piers built in the river.
 
I just hope there is no catastrophic failure on the bridge, given it's 110 years old. Something that might work could be something like the Trans-Canada Highway Bridge between Yoho National Park and Golden, BC.
 
So everyone is concerned with a bridge across the river valley but what I'd like to know how is this train going to get to the river valley. We are assuming that this HSR train will be given access to the current ROW. Is that a given or will that have to be negotiated? If that ROW isn't available how and where does the route get into the city?
 
So everyone is concerned with a bridge across the river valley but what I'd like to know how is this train going to get to the river valley. We are assuming that this HSR train will be given access to the current ROW. Is that a given or will that have to be negotiated? If that ROW isn't available how and where does the route get into the city?

They could always do something like this: https://www.google.com/maps/d/edit?mid=1C9wfOjxT6HXybmkqxjYVfX_qESfTLhQ&usp=sharing

If they're spending billions of dollars on a high speed line, building a couple of tunnels and a viaduct would not break the bank.
 
A mention in the throne speech of rail between Edmonton and Calgary. Will it be to move or to study AGAIN? https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmo...te-alberta-legislature-fall-sitting-1.7011354
Direct from the throne speech:

"Honourable members, as our province grows by another million people over the next five years and to ten million by 2050, so too must investment in our municipalities and provincial transportation network.

Aside from health care facilities, schools and other needed building infrastructure, the province needs to substantially invest in infrastructure that incentivizes economic development, attracts skilled professionals and increases the quality of life of Albertans.

That is why Alberta’s government has been working closely with municipalities across Alberta to finalize a new funding framework that is tied to provincial revenues and provides more predictability for capital planning at the municipal level.

But the province also needs to significantly expand our provincial transportation and highway network and build commuter rail links between our two largest cities and their growing neighbouring communities and airports.

We need to decongest our highways to Kananaskis and Banff with a passenger rail tie between the Calgary airport, downtown Calgary and Canmore/Banff.

And yes, we need to start planning for the inevitable need for high-speed rail through the Calgary-Red Deer-Edmonton corridor when six to seven million Albertans eventually call that corridor their home.

These investments are decades long and should not be made randomly. They must be planned carefully and in an integrated fashion to ensure the most efficient and timely use of tax dollars. Alberta’s government intends to do just that"
 
I think they will probably try to get the Downtown to Airport (and Banff) lines built initially with some commuter rail potential as part of that.

The throne speech hints at the planning of the Calgary Edmonton link which will probably include feasibility studies and land acquisitions based on those studies. To get to the high speed rail stage, some form of commuter rail will likely be needed to support that mode shift. It would be much more successful if there is "feed" on either end of the network.
 
I think they will probably try to get the Downtown to Airport (and Banff) lines built initially with some commuter rail potential as part of that.

The throne speech hints at the planning of the Calgary Edmonton link which will probably include feasibility studies and land acquisitions based on those studies. To get to the high speed rail stage, some form of commuter rail will likely be needed to support that mode shift. It would be much more successful if there is "feed" on either end of the network.
It’s the right approach then. High-speed rail will be quite successful with regional rail in Greater Edmonton and Calgary, on top of the successful LRT systems we have here.
 

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