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leopetr

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Branches halve frequency. Branching UPX means that you'd have twice as much UPX service at the Bloor GO stop than at Union GO

I'm not clear on why we would want to interline Ontario Line and UPX. Is it to better serve people going from Riverdale to Pearson?
 

smallspy

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What you're describing is a short turn.

A branch implies that the service veers from the main line to go to a completely different location while the main line goes to a different location. The VMC vs Glencairn short turn is not a branch line.

The Canada Line has a branched service. One branch goes to Richmond-Bridgehouse and another branch goes to Vancouver Airport. Notice the branch in the service going to 2 different destinations.
View attachment 390488
A branch doesn't need to describe a different location that isn't shared between the two (or more) portions. It's two (or more) different service operations that have an interleaved section - that the terminals are all in line doesn't really matter.

In the TTC parlance, a short turn is used to describe either an unscheduled or one-off situation where a vehicle turns around short of its ultimate destination. What happens on the YUS every morning is scheduled and planned and isn't just a single vehicle.

Dan
 

smallspy

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Wrong terminology. As the other person showed, a branch is not a short turn.
You're hardly the determiner of what the TTC decides to call its operations.

One could argue GO is a branch system as it does have some stations served by multiple lines.
In some ways, it is. But it doesn't use that terminology to describe its operations.

Dan
 

micheal_can

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You're hardly the determiner of what the TTC decides to call its operations.

I am not, but when you look elsewhere to see how it is used, yours is the one that is not in line with what other transit systems use.

In some ways, it is. But it doesn't use that terminology to describe its operations.

Dan
That is true, but that is because each line is very much separate from the rest except for a few stations.
 

rbt

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In the TTC parlance, a short turn is used to describe either an unscheduled or one-off situation where a vehicle turns around short of its ultimate destination. What happens on the YUS every morning is scheduled and planned and isn't just a single vehicle.
It's consistent with bus routes as well, though many have been eliminated with express service rollouts. Each of the letters is a considered a branch, but some lettered routes fully overlap other lettered routes, but with an earlier terminal (bus loop). 36A and 36B are a current day example which the LRT will eliminate, 86A, 86B, and 86C all fully overlap (AFAIR) with different termination points.
 
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fanoftoronto

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A branch doesn't need to describe a different location that isn't shared between the two (or more) portions. It's two (or more) different service operations that have an interleaved section - that the terminals are all in line doesn't really matter.

In the TTC parlance, a short turn is used to describe either an unscheduled or one-off situation where a vehicle turns around short of its ultimate destination. What happens on the YUS every morning is scheduled and planned and isn't just a single vehicle.

Dan

In the terms of transportation, this is what Google gives for branch.

Screenshot_20220405-190323.png
 

crs1026

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^Call it whatever you like….. a line that has two end termini that lie some distance from the “fork in the road” will have different operational issues than one where vehicles simply reverse direction at some midpoint.

The traditional “short turn” is eminently flexible because the reversing vehicle can enter service immediately, or lay over, as the controller’s needs it. A short-turning outbound vehicle usually only forces through riders to wait for one or two vehicles.

Whereas - with a bifurcated route, a disruption or delay on one of the “branches” means service becomes unpredictable in the inbound direction and throughput on the “trunk” portion of the route falls…. a much bigger knot to untangle.

Things might be better today than with 1960’s control technology, but the 1966 experiment would be disastrous today, with any disruption on one line leading to service gaps on the other, and then bunched-up interchanging trains blocking one line while awaiting a slot to enter the other line.

- Paul
 

fanoftoronto

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Cool.

The TTC - who is the organization that we are talking about - uses a different definition.

Dan

Just to clarify, where does the TTC define that what happens on the YUS line everyday is a branch service?

Even if it does call it a "branch" service, it simply means that the TTC is wrong as per the definition of the word. English as a language has defined explanations of all words, which is what I have shown you.

We can't change the definition of words based on the organizations choosing to ignore the actual definition as per the dictionary. By that same logic, what Russia is doing in Ukraine is indeed a "Special Military Operation" and not a war, coz that's what Russia calls it.
 

micheal_can

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As our system becomes bigger and more complex, I don't see why we shouldn't have branches to better serve different parts of the city. "We don't do things that way in Toronto!" is not a valid reason.
Show me another city that their singular line runs at crush load for much of the line and has branches on that line.
 

turini2

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Does anyone know why they didn't do green tracks in Finch West like they've done on Eglinton?
Money, probably. It's more expensive to install green tracks, despite their benefits. Best bet for green tracks in future is Hamilton (again, if there's money for it) or Waterfront streetcar extensions.
 

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