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Goldie

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Edward Beckett, Globe Foundry, 50 Queen St. W., n. side, between James & Bay Sts. 1882 TPL
This is where Toronto's "old" City Hall was later built (1899).
Edward Beckett, Globe Foundry, 50 Queen St. W., n. side, between James & Bay Sts. 1882 TPL.jpg


Old City Hall 50 Queen W.jpg
 

Goldie

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St. Leonard's Anglican Church, Wanless Ave., between Yonge St. & Leith Place TPL
Corner-stone ceremony, 1921.
L to R...Mr. Hemburrow, Mrs. Charles Carpenter, Charles Carpenter, Mr. Molyneux and Mr. Shadbolt. The building originally stood on Bowood Ave.; in 1921 it was moved to Wanless Ave. & enlarged.
St. Leonard's Anglican Church, Wanless Ave., between Yonge St. & Leith Place TPL.jpg


cornerstones St. Leonard's.jpg
 
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adma

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Judging from the cigar factory, St. Lawrence Hall was already being "degraded" by 1891 (and I wonder if the compromises required by such a conversion ultimately helped lead to the E wing's collapse in 1967)
 

adma

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I find it interesting that they were using such an anachronistic kind of "Stop" sign as late as 1956. (Come to think of it, when did Ontario adopt the octagon? I know the present red version originated in the States in 1954; but I don't seem to recall previous Stateside versions in any old Toronto pictures)
 

Goldie

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Excellent observation, adma.
Your comment prompted me to observe the number of traffic signals at the current intersection........I see 9 (not including the pedestrian signals)
There would be even more to see if we had views in the other directions.
Is this proliferation of signals really warranted?
My conclusion is that the company manufacturing these signal-lights for the City of Toronto has, in its employ, a magnificent salesperson who could probably sell the proverbial "refrigerators to Eskimos."
Somebody is making a fortune at taxpayer expense.

.
 

lenaitch

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Excellent observation, adma.
Your comment prompted me to observe the number of traffic signals at the current intersection........I see 9 (not including the pedestrian signals)
There would be even more to see if we had views in the other directions.
Is this proliferation of signals really warranted?
My conclusion is that the company manufacturing these signal-lights for the City of Toronto has, in its employ, a magnificent salesperson who could probably sell the proverbial "refrigerators to Eskimos."
Somebody is making a fortune at taxpayer expense.

.


The number, placement and configuration of traffic signals are laid out in O/Reg 626 under the HTA and further described in the Ontario Traffic Manual.


(odd that it is a QC address but that's what came up)

I tried to find out when Ontario stopped using the white rectangular stop sign but could not. I have the vaguest of memories of seeing them, but recall that they said "through road" rather than 'through highway'. Apparently the first octagonal stop sign standard (date unknown) was yellow because there was no red coating of the day that would not quickly fade.
 

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