News   GLOBAL  |  Apr 02, 2020
 8.6K     0 
News   GLOBAL  |  Apr 01, 2020
 39K     0 
News   GLOBAL  |  Apr 01, 2020
 4.9K     0 

Not really. There are other English names on the REM line, like Kirkland, Sunnybrooke, Fairview, Griffintown, etc. My guess is that the planners wanted a station name with symbolic significance – Marie Curie was a woman who made world-changing scientific achievements.
Hang on - the station is literally at the intersection of Alfred Nobel and Albert Einstein - but they wanted a name with symbolic importance?

CTCUM had a long history in the 1970s and 1980s of avoiding English names - even when they were most appropriate. Vendome was the merger of two stations (One at Sherbrook Avenue and one at the now closed Westmount station). The merger was technical/political, as they wanted an interchange station with the CP commuter line, and Westmount vetoed it being in Westmount. But Vendome Avenue was a little known short street at the time. The entrance was actually a block over at Marlowe until very recently. The next station up was called Monkland (on Monkland Avenue), but they finally switched to Villa Maria - perhaps "Monkland" didn't fit Quebec's secularity. I'm not sure how Snowdon slipped through ... though it's an odd choice, given that Snowdon Street is 3 blocks to the south. The obvious name for the station is Queen Mary - as that is the main artery there.

Metro Plamondon on Victoria Avenue is perhaps the oddest, as Plamondon was a little-known residential street, 3 blocks north of the station. The station would have logically been called Van Horne. And why did they go for Plamondon - probably because the two streets in-between are Kent and Carlton!

On the Green line, the station south of Lionel Groulx is Charlevoix. Okay, it's on Charlevoix street - but the line just about runs along Charlevoix - which intersects Avenue Lionel-Groulx! The cross street is Centre Street. Metro La Salle (in Verdun) is also very odd, as you'd think it would be in LaSalle itself - near the Angrignon Park terminus. But apparently it's named for Boulevard LaSalle a couple of blocks away (and running parallel to the line) - but they wouldn't want to call it Rushbrooke. The next station is De l'Eglise - at the intersection of Galt and Wellington.

The Blue line isn't bad, but didn't escape completely. Outremont is at least in Outremont - at the intersection of Van Horne and Wiseman. Édouard-Montpetit was originally going to be called Vincent D'Indy (and the pre-opening maps had that name) - though that's not an English issue, it's at the intersection of Édouard-Montpetit and Vincent D'Indy. But Édouard-Montpetit is a long street, running close to Cote-St-Catherine, Cote-des-Neiges, and Université-de-Montréal stations. I'm really not sure why they changed that one.

It would be interesting to see if they ever built Metro Cavendish what name it ends up with!

Here's the 1982 metro map that was on the trains. Yeah, that's an ugly font - I believe the previous and later version both had the more traditional font. The previous version also showed a different Blue line alignment, turning at Pie-IX up the later White Line (Line 7) alignment to Montreal-Nord - and I vaguely recall it showing the western Blue Line extension to Montreal West (which would surely end up being Montreal-Ouest) - I wish I could find that one. And the following one that showed the Pie-IX (White Line) metro.

I'm looking forward to some of these stations on the 40-year old map opening in the early 2030s!

1673080710964.png
 
Last edited:
There has been a concerted push in Quebec to name more things after women, and I'm sure that factored into the CDPQ's decision making.

I don't doubt CTCUM planners avoided English names but the language situation isn't quite the same today as it was in the 70s and 80s, and the CDPQ is much less likely to be influenced by language politics in its operations. After all, the CEO who spearheaded the REM was Michael Sabia, an anglo from Ontario.
 
Our subway fully underground and I like it this way. I would continue the subway a few stations but REM de l’est will make this obsolete going from Hororé-Beaugrand to Pointe au trembles.
Is that the current plan? How does that differ from Montreal's proposed line 8 LRT in 1984?

1673832102387.png
 
Is that the current plan? How does that differ from Montreal's proposed line 8 LRT in 1984?

View attachment 450733
Yes for the Blue Line. However, I was talking about the REM de l’est. However, the design still in the works. The REM would connect Pointe de l’ile with Lacordaire (blue line) l’Assomption (Green Line), Sherbrooke (Orange Line) and Saint-Laurent (Green Line) + Gare centrale.
070B86FF-0ED3-4734-81CC-21FFAFF9DB91.png
 
Yes for the Blue Line. However, I was talking about the REM de l’est. However, the design still in the works. The REM would connect Pointe de l’ile with Lacordaire (blue line) l’Assomption (Green Line), Sherbrooke (Orange Line) and Saint-Laurent (Green Line) + Gare centrale. View attachment 450749
This was a proposal made by Marco Chitti, and not the actual plan being pursued by the ARTM. From what we know about the current actual plans for REM de L'Est (assuming it doesn't get cancelled which there is a good chance it does), it is just a U-Shaped suburban line running between Marie-Victorin and Pointe-aux-Trembles, requiring passengers to transfer to Assomption in order to reach downtown. The common branch running to Downtown Montreal seems to have been cut.
 
This was a proposal made by Marco Chitti, and not the actual plan being pursued by the ARTM. From what we know about the current actual plans for REM de L'Est (assuming it doesn't get cancelled which there is a good chance it does), it is just a U-Shaped suburban line running between Marie-Victorin and Pointe-aux-Trembles, requiring passengers to transfer to Assomption in order to reach downtown. The common branch running to Downtown Montreal seems to have been cut.
Yes It could be the « thing » to derailed this project. Many different lines have been propose as now peoples know what the REM is, everyone wants one. Will be interesting to see if any significants development during the year.
 

Breakdown of a car pushed to its limit in the ice​

January 11, 2023
The Réseau express métropolitain (REM) was faced with a breakdown during an episode of freezing rain in early January on the South Shore, as part of tests carried out in "extreme conditions", learned La Presse . For CDPQ Infra, the situation illustrates that the postponement to spring 2023 was the right decision, the time to collect more data on wagons pushed “to their limit”.
It all happened on January 5th. That day, an REM car was deployed on the route without first activating the protocol related to ice and winter weather. In other words, the wagons were put into service without scrapers, which allow the moving catenaries to be de-iced.

Result: the REM managed to cross the Samuel-De Champlain bridge, but stopped just after, not far from the Costco warehouse. The car had “lost contact” with the catenary, this set of wires which supplies the cars with electricity. A mitigation plan was then deployed to bring the wagons back to Central Station.

Such an operation “is part of the good test practices aimed at pushing the system and the cars to their limit”, however assures the director of communications of CDPQ Infra, Jean-Vincent Lacroix.
“There will be some breakdowns at the start. But in our case, everything is more integrated than in Ottawa, where rolling stock and infrastructure suppliers are separate. Here, the REM also sits somewhere between Ottawa technology and heavy rail. In theory, its catenaries are not as light as in Ottawa. We can thus expect greater resilience, ”he reasons.

 

Breakdown of a car pushed to its limit in the ice​

January 11, 2023





So they put a train into winter conditions without the proper winterization systems on it, and it failed. Shocking!
 
So they put a train into winter conditions without the proper winterization systems on it, and it failed. Shocking!
Sounds more like ice buildup on the catenary. Even with a car passing every 5 minutes, that's going to shut everything down from time to time. Even on TTC after 130+ years of streetcar, every few years you see streetcars stopping every few metres, while they get out and bang the pole against the wire to shake the ice off.

I wonder how different that will be with the switch to pantographs - I don't recall a good ice storm since they started to switch.
 
Sounds more like ice buildup on the catenary. Even with a car passing every 5 minutes, that's going to shut everything down from time to time. Even on TTC after 130+ years of streetcar, every few years you see streetcars stopping every few metres, while they get out and bang the pole against the wire to shake the ice off.

I wonder how different that will be with the switch to pantographs - I don't recall a good ice storm since they started to switch.
They have ice racks on the REM pantographs, the tests done didn't have them on, so it's normal that it failed.

Updates on the "REM" de l'Est.
 
They have ice racks on the REM pantographs, the tests done didn't have them on, so it's normal that it failed.

Updates on the "REM" de l'Est.
Further, it says a preliminary report on the changes will be out at the end of the week and a final one in June.
According to La Presse CDPQ Infra is still working on plans for REM extensions to Boucherville, Laval and Lanaudière.
 

Back
Top