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I think the hamlet (Sherwood Park) we are referring to is yet again being confused with the county. Yes, it makes no sense and is confusing.
 
I'm not sure if Sohi is doing stuff behind the scenes, but it sure feels like he's pretty content letting Don Iveson's legacy of regional cooperation crash and burn. Not what voters thought they were getting.
 
I'm not sure if Sohi is doing stuff behind the scenes, but it sure feels like he's pretty content letting Don Iveson's legacy of regional cooperation crash and burn. Not what voters thought they were getting.

I wonder what voters could reasonably expect, electing a former Liberal federal minister in the middle of CPC heartland.

On the other hand it takes two to tango, and talking the talk about cooperation is all well when times are good. Right now it definitely feels like every man for himself, the region doesn't have a history of banding together when the going gets tough.
 
I don't think the mayor's past political history is a major reason here, although the previous mayor did seem to offer more and stronger leadership on this, the current one just seems to let the mice play. I do feel there is a sense of Edmonton Global under performing, which has been raised by some people in Edmonton, as well as this suburban area.

I agree that cooperation is harder when times are not as good. This is precisely when people start to look more at whether they feel there is value for money. Add to this that some of our large suburbs already have an underlying go it alone mentality and don't have much commitment to the region to begin with.
 
I wonder what voters could reasonably expect, electing a former Liberal federal minister in the middle of CPC heartland.

On the other hand it takes two to tango, and talking the talk about cooperation is all well when times are good. Right now it definitely feels like every man for himself, the region doesn't have a history of banding together when the going gets tough.
Iveson had tough budgets too. And Iveson was also a progressive figure. But he somehow got it done. Sohi just isn't delivering.
 
Iveson had tough budgets too. And Iveson was also a progressive figure. But he somehow got it done. Sohi just isn't delivering.
I don't feel like stepping up to bat for Sohi in this case, his vote against EMTSC didn't sit well with me. All I'll say is that I think it's a mistake to expect the Mayor, or even Edmonton, to take the lead in regional coorporation. There is a sense of wariness from the other municipalities that it is already too dominant, even if I think it's the opposite with the way things currently stand.

If anything the Province needs to drive any further initiatives, and they are quite happy to see the suburbs and rural areas grow - that's where their voter base is, after all.
 
Mistake, maybe. But leadership from Edmonton is the main way we've seen regional cooperation to date , with two solid former mayors playing a driving role. Without that pillar of support, you can't help but think regional cooperation is going to suffer pretty dramatically. Edmonton Global is the one bright spot where most are onboard and we can't afford to lose that.
 
But leadership from Edmonton is the main way we've seen regional cooperation to date , with two solid former mayors playing a driving role.

Iveson yes, but Mandel not so much. I know firsthand he was not liked by some of the leaders/admin in the surrounding municipalities and that Iveson rebuilt a few key relationships and trust. I respect you may have a completely different account of Mandel in this respect, but not in my circles.

Not saying Mandel was in the wrong, but just one example of some of the tension at the time:

 
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As long as the Edmonton-area municipalities are divided, regional co-operation will be difficult. Still, the Edmonton area has about 1.5 million people.
 
Here is the complete PR the EJ is referring to above post #42. Interesting to see how Montreal and Vancouver will grow at less than 1/2 of Edmonton's GDP growth in 2024.

"Ottawa, December 7, 2023 — Canadian cities will experience slow growth for the remainder of 2023, as higher interest rates and persistent inflation erode consumer purchasing power and constrain local economies, according to new research from The Conference Board of Canada.

“Following Canada’s rebound from the pandemic, higher interest rates and stubborn inflation have started to ease consumer spending,” said Jane McIntyre, Principal Economist at The Conference Board of Canada. “We expect this economic slowdown to continue into 2024 across most cities but predict slight momentum gains in 2025.”

  • Edmonton’s real GDP growth will slow to 2.9 per cent in 2023, still outperforming all other major Canadian cities, before retreating to 1.8 per cent in 2024. Improvements in oil prices have stimulated the economy across Alberta, including Edmonton, the provincial capital. The city’s solid economy and affordable housing are attracting out of province homebuyers, accelerating population growth and housing sales, but also prompting faster price increases.
  • Global demand for several of Saskatchewan’s key resources remains strong, but significant declines in commodity prices will have spillover effects for Saskatoon. GDP is forecast to grow by 2.8 per cent in 2023, reflecting a drop from the previous year, yet keeping the city well above the provincial average. Projected growth for 2024 is 1.9 per cent.
  • Winnipeg’s manufacturing sector is set for expansion due to supply chain improvements and a new bus contract acquired by New Flyer. Ongoing construction of the CentrePort Canada rail park will also strengthen the city’s transportation and warehousing sectors. However, a minor economic slowdown is expected, with GDP forecast to increase 2.7 per cent in 2023 followed by a lesser 1.2 per cent in 2024.
  • With London’s tight labour market and consumers’ excess savings, households have remained confident in their spending on services, but higher interest rates are starting to take a toll. GDP growth is expected to be 2.7 per cent in 2023 before slowing to 1.1 per cent in 2024.
  • Job gains in the goods-producing industries will drive an employment surge in Moncton, although this uptick will be temporary. The cooling of consumer spending is leading to job losses in some sectors, while labour shortages plague others. Economic growth is forecasted to expand by 2.4 per cent in 2023, slowing dramatically to 0.6 per cent in 2024.
  • Unemployment is set to rise due to the impacts of higher interest rates, but Windsor’s overall outlook remains positive, largely due to the considerable number of investments the city has attracted. Growth in the city’s economy is projected to be 2.4 per cent in 2023 before moderating to 1.7 per cent in 2024.
  • Strong employment prospects and affordable housing prices are spurring Calgary’s local housing demand. GDP for the city is forecast to increase 2.3 per cent in 2023 and a further 2.1 per cent in 2024.
  • Thunder Bay’s $1.2 billion jail project will stimulate local job growth and support economic expansion. GDP is anticipated to rise to 2.0 per cent in 2023 and an additional 2.5 per cent in 2024.
  • Conditions for Saskatchewan’s resources are mixed, but a number of key commodity prices are softening. As the provincial capital, Reginawill experience the effects of these conditions, which is anticipated to limit growth to 2.0 per cent in 2023 and 1.5 per cent in 2024.
  • Oshawa’s manufacturing sector, an economic staple, is poised for growth due to investments from General Motors and the provincial and federal governments that will support the city’s GM plant. GDP is projected to expand by 1.9 per cent in 2023 and 1.8 per cent in 2024.
  • As a result of the declining demand for goods, domestically and internationally, the biggest drag on Halifax’s growth will be the goods sector. GDP is expected to rise 1.8 per cent in 2023 before expanding a further 1.0 per cent in 2024.
  • Elevated net international migration in the St. Catharines-Niagararegion will help support labour supply, however, labour shortages will persist. The region’s heavy dependence on the services sector will help shield it from a major downturn during the slowdown. GDP is forecast to grow 1.8 per cent in 2023, slowing to 1.3 per cent growth in 2024.
  • Declining consumer purchasing power and elevated borrowing costs for businesses will curtail short-term domestic demand and hinder growth in several of Kingson’s key sectors. The city’s real GDP growth is expected to be 1.7 per cent in 2023 and 1.0 per cent in 2024.
  • Kitchener-Cambridge-Waterloo’s anticipated employment gains in 2024 are expected to outpace the increase in the labour force, but rising interest rates and a recession threat will limit GDP growth to 1.7 per cent in 2023 and 1.5 per cent in 2024.
  • Despite improvements in supply side issues, cooling domestic and international demand will dampen short-term growth in Toronto’smanufacturing sector. GDP is forecast to expand by 1.5 per cent in 2023 and 1.3 per cent in 2024.
  • Employment growth in Guelph remains positive, but slower job gains will lead to a spike in unemployment in the region. GDP is forecast to advance 1.5 per cent in 2023 and 1.2 per cent in 2024.
  • Weak housing demand is hindering growth in Montreal’s finance, insurance, and real estate, the city’s largest sector. Output from the manufacturing sector is also expected to slow, as high prices lower demand for goods and rising interest rates discourage investments. The city’s GDP is forecast to expand 1.4 per cent in 2023 and a further 0.7 per cent in 2024.
  • Households in Ottawa-Gatineau are better prepared to handle rising interest rates and persistent inflation due to the region’s high incomes relative to other Canadian cities. Still, GDP growth is forecast to slow to a modest 1.3 per cent in 2023 and 1.1 per cent in 2024.
  • Tightening household finances, impacted by higher costs of consumer essentials, are curbing short-term consumer spending, which is hurting output from Vancouver’s retail trade sector. The city’s real GDP will increase by 1.2 per cent in 2023 and 1.5 per cent in 2024, largely due to growth in the services-producing industry.
  • Minimal output advancement in Hamilton’s goods sector has been a major constraint on the city’s overall economic growth, contributing to a 0.9 per cent increase in real GDP for 2023. While still modest, economic growth will reach 1.6 per cent in 2024.
  • Even with strong net international migration, Victoria’s labour force is expected to decline. Inflation and high interest rates are dragging on the local economy, which is forecasted to expand by 0.9 per cent in 2023 followed by 1.4 per cent in 2024.
  • High interest rates are impacting Greater Sudbury’s real estate activity, new home construction, and consumer spending, lowering the region’s real GDP growth to just 0.3 per cent in 2023. However, mining investments and strong population growth are expected to boost GDP growth to 1.2 per cent in 2024.
  • A host of challenges, including high interest rates, reduced consumer spending, and labour shortages will limit Québec City’s GDP growth to just 0.1 per cent in 2023. The local economy will come to a standstill in 2024.
  • With ongoing challenges in the province’s oil and gas industry, no growth is expected for St. John’s in 2023. However, as the province’s offshore oil industry rebounds, growth in the local economy will pick up to 1.8 per cent in 2024."
 

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