crumplescotch

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There is a very small percentage of wines that benefit from long term aging. The vast majority are made to be consumed within a relatively short timeframe (5 years or so).

You quite literally pay for bottle aging. When it comes to, let's say, Bordeaux, we're looking at minimum of 10 years of aging, the price increases for each passing year.
 

vinny_the_hack

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That's dependent on the style of the wine though. A Beaujolais Nouveau is meant to be drunk new. A Chateauneuf-du-Pape is meant to be aged in the bottle (around 10 years for best results).

Distinguishing wines that do well with age vs those that don't isn't the same as saying "Bottle-aging generally does nothing to enhance a wine" or "The best one can hope for is that it survives storage until it is drunk."
It is very much the same. Please note my purposeful use of the word "generally". But I thank you for pointing out an exception.
 

zang

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All I learned in the past page or two, is that there are cellars in condos now.
Amenities include:
-pool,
-gym
-sauna,
-cellar. ;)

What else do you need really?
I think he means "cellar" in the "collection" sense. Though, I have actually heard wine coolers/refrigeraters marketed as "cellars" as well.
 
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Northern Light

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Even in Bordeaux, not all wines are made to be cellared. It may be semantics, but you are not paying for bottle aging. You are paying premium prices for quality and exclusivity. The prices increase over time because the wines become more scarce. Back to the original point - most wines are not that and should be enjoyed sooner rather later. Cheers!

Agreed; in the case of Beaujolais Nouveau we can all agree they don't need to be cellared; however, I would argue strongly for sewering it instead.

That plonk has all the appeal of soured milk.

Now if we're talking one of the Cru from Beaujolais that's a whole different game.
 

Northern Light

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I think he means "cellar" in the "collection" sense. Though, I have actually heard wine coolers/refrigerated marketed as "cellars" as well.

ViaBloor The Selby has an outdoor wine fridge:

As per this photo from @Benito in the Via Bloor thread.

img_6038-jpg.333021


I mean, if it's too small to swim in; might as well keep your wine cool. (not recommended for corked bottles)
 
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interchange42

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ViaBloor has an outdoor wine fridge:

As per this photo from @Benito

img_6038-jpg.333021


I mean, if it's too small to swim in; might as well keep your wine cool. (not recommended for corked bottles)
That's the Selby's outdoor wine cellar. Via Bloor figures in the background.

42
 

evandyk

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Is that one of those pools they push a current through to make it harder to swim laps? That would chill a bottle pretty quickly!
 

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