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Eglinton doesn't have the highest ridership east of Don Mills. The TTC is handling higher ridership volumes than are found on Eglinton with buses. Once all those condos on the Golden Mile are occupied, the Ontario Line will be running. I don't see the case for the Eglinton to be at capacity.

Let's hope so. However, the ridership level of a bus route is not always predictive for the future rail transit demand once. The latter can be boosted a lot if many riders switch from other routes.

Finch West LRT is easier to predict, since there aren't many riders who can switch from other routes.

Eglinton is a wildcard, a central and very long line that potentially serves a lot of origin / destination pairs, including those where neither the origin nor the destination is near Eglinton. But we can't know in advance how many people will actually change their routine.
 
Line 1 is full before Eglinton during rush hour. Before the Ontario line is up and running I don't see any reason to switch to Eglinton from another feeder route. What would those situations potentially be?
 
Line 1 is full before Eglinton during rush hour. Before the Ontario line is up and running I don't see any reason to switch to Eglinton from another feeder route. What would those situations potentially be?

Oddly enough, I have a feeling quite a few people along Jane will take Crosstown, since until the extension opens, the buses will be doing a 5 min detour to Mt Dennis. My guess is, time from Mt Dennis to, say, St George station will have a 10-15 min savings over the bus/line2.

The East side likely won't be competitive due to marginal speed difference, however, there are probably some people that go between Eglinton and Kennedy using the subway (knew somebody like that, he didn't like taking the bus even if it took less time), which will likely switch. Not sure how many of those exist.
 
Oddly enough, I have a feeling quite a few people along Jane will take Crosstown, since until the extension opens, the buses will be doing a 5 min detour to Mt Dennis. My guess is, time from Mt Dennis to, say, St George station will have a 10-15 min savings over the bus/line2.

The East side likely won't be competitive due to marginal speed difference, however, there are probably some people that go between Eglinton and Kennedy using the subway (knew somebody like that, he didn't like taking the bus even if it took less time), which will likely switch. Not sure how many of those exist.
West of Yonge riders have incentive to switch to Eglinton. East of Don Mills not so much.
 
Line 1 is full before Eglinton during rush hour. Before the Ontario line is up and running I don't see any reason to switch to Eglinton from another feeder route. What would those situations potentially be?

Not for downtown-bound trips.

Say, your origin is at Warden & St Clair, destination at Kipling & Dixon. Today, you would probably take a bus south to Line 2, subway to Kipling, and bus north to Dixon. When ECLRT opens, you can save 5-10 min if you take a bus north to Eglinton, ECLRT to Kipling, and bus to Dixon.

Each such O-D pair has a small demand, but the total # of pairs is large. The combined impact is hard to predict.
 
Not hard to imagine a routing app identifying 3 potential routes from Warden/St Clair subway station to Dixon && Kipling:
1. Take Line 2 westbound for 29 stops to Kipling stn and bus 37A or 37B north on Kipling
2. Take bus 68A or 68B north on Warden to Golden Mile stn and Line 5 westbound 26 stops to Kipling / Eglinton then 37A/37B north on Kipling Ave
3. Take Line 2 eastbound to Kennedy, then Line 5 westbound 29 stops to Kipling, then 37A/37B north on Kipling Ave.
I haven't tried to calculate the trip durations but the route it would recommend would be based on both the trip duration and the next arriving service.

The benefit of moving from two subway lines to a transportation network.
 
Not hard to imagine a routing app identifying 3 potential routes from Warden/St Clair subway station to Dixon && Kipling:
Apps can be a bit flakey sometimes with transit - especially with more than one mode. They really need to be taken with a grain of salt.

Lately Google Maps has me walking in circles on the street for 6 minutes when changing from bus to subway. And then still pads the wait for the subway by a further 10 minutes. Which means it almost never gives the option of taking a bus to the subway, instead telling me to walk. And therefore keeps suggesting slower routes that don't involve the subway.

(16 minutes to transfer from Bus to Subway at Woodbine!)

1694113857279.png
 
West of Yonge riders have incentive to switch to Eglinton. East of Don Mills not so much.
it depends, if you live at Lawrence and Warden, a good argument could be made to take the bus down to Eglinton, and transfer to Line 5 west to Yonge. That is, assuming Line 5 does its job as Rapid Transit properly...
 
Honestly, if I was going downtown I'd still go to Line 2 - at least until the Ontario Line opens.

If going downtown, definitely. But if going to somewhere in Etobicoke, north of Eglinton ..

The potential concern is the unknown number of crosstown trips that use Line 2 or the northern bus routes today, and will switch to ECLRT once it opens. Probably won't overload Eglinton in the near future, but the room to accommodate any further growth will be limited.
 
There's two branches of transit lines going north South in the middle of our network/city

1 in the east end with the SSE going to North to Sheppard

So the west end will/should get a north South line, where that goes, I wouldn't be best to advise on that
 
There's no obvious routing for a north/south route in the west end. Personally, I think a diagonal weston rd/kichener line alignment would probably be the most effective routing.
 

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