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This is just one story, but believe it or not I was talking to a guy a few months ago who was not part of this UofA employee group but who was required to come work dt after WFH and I asked about his experience downtown and he said he doesn't leave the office or go to any of the businesses. He is upset about having to work dt and said he purposely will not support any businesses. It wasn't about safety.
This is a rare attitude I hope, but wow.

I told him if you get out and experience different events going on or go on some walks or check out some different eateries you might actually enjoy it more.

His response was, "I'm stubborn."
That was a common sentiment among people when they were forced to come DT after WFH. I think that's abated and gone down a bit, but I heard it a lottt last year (including on Reddit, but Reddit whines and complains about everything tbh). My previous workplace had similar sentiments too, where people were intensely complaining even coming in once every few weeks.

But yeah, it wasn't about "safety" as well for some of these people. I get that DT has had that unsafe reputation as of late, but I straight up believe it's an excuse for some people who just didn't wanna change their WFH dynamic.
 
Yes, safety is only one part of it, but it sounds less self serving than convenience. Ultimately it is the employers decision about work location and if they feel WFO is better for their business, then that is what they will do.

However, of course it is also the employees decision about who to work for, although if you are in a specialized position or field, or the economy slows, there may not be a lot of other choices.
 
That was a common sentiment among people when they were forced to come DT after WFH. I think that's abated and gone down a bit, but I heard it a lottt last year (including on Reddit, but Reddit whines and complains about everything tbh). My previous workplace had similar sentiments too, where people were intensely complaining even coming in once every few weeks.

But yeah, it wasn't about "safety" as well for some of these people. I get that DT has had that unsafe reputation as of late, but I straight up believe it's an excuse for some people who just didn't wanna change their WFH dynamic.
I 100% agree that the 'pushback' from those WFH has more to do about 'personal convenience' then anything - having to get up earlier, get ready, commute, pay for parking, etc. But at the end of the day it is up the respective employer to figure out what works best for their business, whatever that might be. But I think we're starting to see the trend swing back towards having more people in the office.
 

West 240 Public Open House​

Join us at the​


Public Open Houses​

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University of Alberta Properties Trust has revised the Master Plan to guide the development of West 240, a section of land located between the communities of Grandview and Lansdowne, and between Whitemud Creek and 122 Street.

We appreciate the feedback we have received from our neighbours, and we look forward to sharing the revised Master Plan for West 240. Join us at one of the events to learn more:


Wednesday, November 8, 2023​


Grandview Heights Community Centre

7:00pm to 9:00pm, drop in anytime

or

Thursday, November 9, 2023​


Lansdowne Community Hall

5:00pm to 7:00pm, drop in anytime

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For more information visit www.West240.site

We hope to see you there!

The University of Alberta Properties Trust Team
Copyright (C) - 2023
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA PROPERTIES TRUST.
All rights reserved.



Home | University of Alberta Properties Trust (uapt.ca)
 
Went to the open house in Grandview. Fairly packed with lots of people coming. Former councillor Walters was there but no Janz or other city elected officials while I was there. Listening in on the chatter and some people like it, Many with pitchforks though who want the farm to stay because it’s always been there. The plan I found was well boring. It looked like a regular new subdivision kind of like Summerside. All the features of the farm, the trees in the corners, the moose and deer that wander through has all been cleansed. Lots of talk about a canopy of trees. On boulevards that is nice but no canopy anywhere. Oh a school site in the middle. Innovative. Good luck getting a school since by the time buildout is well on its way the surrounding schools will have space due to aging households. I wish they would do something innovative like grow a forest in the shape of an “A” with the top in the SW corner and these green lines connecting to each corner of the property. Use the acres fro the school site and spread it out through the community, and in a few years from above you would see a giant A for U of A of course. You would have more residences backing onto true wild green space (more revenue for the U) and would truly have a canopy. Right now this master plan is nothing like the UBC properties (daughter is 2nd year there). And it’s all designed for cars to get in and out without bothering Landsdowne or Grandview residents. This could be so much more then missing middle with urban village on 122nd St. I hope it evolves from what was presented as a bunch of dull.
 
More research is great, we have been fairly solid on this and are fortunate to have the U of A. Where things seem to not be as strong is turning this research into big profitable business that remain here.

There is a fair amount of support for start ups, but getting beyond that here seems to be challenging.
 
Anyone know what AHS plans to do with the space the U of A previously was leasing for the John Scott Library? The U of A vacated that space this past summer as the Sperber Library was ready to move into.
 
Government takes further action to build more homes, faster
From: Department of Finance Canada

News release
Unlocking funding for student housing

January 29, 2024 - Ottawa, Ontario - Department of Finance Canada

Today, as part of Canada's economic plan, the government announced further action to build more homes, faster, by supporting the construction of student housing.

Canada is home to some of the world’s best higher learning institutions. Not only do they help provide skills for the future, they create jobs, and foster a young and dynamic community. But when students are unable to find a place to live on or near campus, they look to the nearby community, which can drive up rent and reduce the number of homes for everyone.

To help fix this, the Government of Canada will be offering low-cost loans to build more student housing on- and off-campus. By reforming the Apartment Construction Loan Program, we will help more students find housing they can afford close to where they study, and help ensure that there are more homes available for families who live in those same communities year-round.

These important steps to support the construction of student housing are just one piece of the government’s economic plan that addresses housing challenges and boosts affordability. This measure is one of many reforms committed to in the 2023 Fall Economic Statement to unlock new home construction financing.

 
Government takes further action to build more homes, faster
From: Department of Finance Canada

News release
Unlocking funding for student housing

January 29, 2024 - Ottawa, Ontario - Department of Finance Canada

Today, as part of Canada's economic plan, the government announced further action to build more homes, faster, by supporting the construction of student housing.

Canada is home to some of the world’s best higher learning institutions. Not only do they help provide skills for the future, they create jobs, and foster a young and dynamic community. But when students are unable to find a place to live on or near campus, they look to the nearby community, which can drive up rent and reduce the number of homes for everyone.

To help fix this, the Government of Canada will be offering low-cost loans to build more student housing on- and off-campus. By reforming the Apartment Construction Loan Program, we will help more students find housing they can afford close to where they study, and help ensure that there are more homes available for families who live in those same communities year-round.

These important steps to support the construction of student housing are just one piece of the government’s economic plan that addresses housing challenges and boosts affordability. This measure is one of many reforms committed to in the 2023 Fall Economic Statement to unlock new home construction financing.



This for South Campus please and thank you
 

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