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flar

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Housing in WALLACEBURG, ONTARIO

Although Wallaceburg is my hometown, I never really took a good look at its housing. One thing
that stands out about Wallaceburg is that, for an Ontario town, there are relatively few brick
houses. The other thing is that, at first glance, there seem to be few grand Victorian homes,
especially for a town of this size. But as we will see, once you look a little closer, Wallaceburg
actually has quite a unique and interesting housing stock.


We'll start with a few well preserved examples.

The first is a Italianate mansion built in 1863.
00133.jpg



This Queen Anne home (1887) underwent extensive restoration about 20 years ago. "Painted Ladies" are
quite rare in brick-loving Ontario.
00085.jpg



This smaller one was renovated more recently
00116.jpg


00086.jpg



This house, built around 1860, was a real treat to discover. The Neo-Classical style is fairly rare
in Ontario.
00112.jpg


00137.jpg



Somewhat-preserverd Queen Anne:
00063.jpg



Here are a few brick homes more typical of Ontario architecture

A striking Queen Anne mansion has served as the Rectory for Our Lady of Help Roman Catholic Church
since 1901.
00065.jpg


00087.jpg



This one was built in 1890.
00120.jpg


00108.jpg



This 1905 Edwardian mansion is deceptively large.
00102.jpg



A similar, but less elaborate home.
00128.jpg



Unfortunately, many of Wallaceburg's older homes are in poor condition.

A Gothic Revival Mansion (1858) built built for Capt. James Steinhoff, an early community leader.
00119.jpg



Another Gothic Revial house built for Capt. Steinhoff's brother in 1865.
00135.jpg



Another one from around the turn of the century:
00142.jpg




Now, a little detective work and a lot of speculation...

A forumer by the name of PS curr posted this photo of his aunt's former home in Wallaceburg:
wallaceburgontario1064.jpg


A beautiful Gothic Revival house with a steeply pitched roof and some very elaborate woodwork. I
searched it out because I was very curious about its current state.

Here is what it looks like today:
00018.jpg


Although the house is in good repair, all of the Victorian details have been removed. Knowing
what this house used to look like, I looked around very closely for evidence of other formerly
great houses. Unfortunately, this is one of the most run-down neighbourhoods in Wallaceburg, so
I had little hope of finding anything.

This house, about a block away from the one above, still has the original wood siding.
00015.jpg


Most of the others have been covered in vinyl siding and have had their details removed. I saw
several large homes that were probably once very beautiful. These would be considered Gothic Revival.

00029.jpg


00022.jpg


00117.jpg


This one even has the pointed Gothic window
00031.jpg


00032.jpg


This one suffered a fate worse than vinyl, but still has remnants of its bargeboards.
00028.jpg



Most of the houses above have bay windows. The details are covered in siding, but these houses
show what the bays would have looked like:
00021.jpg


00056.jpg



Cottages like those seen extensively throughout Ontario, often called Ontario Gothic cottages.

00012.jpg


00025.jpg



Some later homes, probably built about the 1890s.
00035.jpg


00037.jpg


00046.jpg
 
These houses display the Second Empire style, extremely rare in this part of Southwestern Ontario.
The first two (and likely the others) were built in the 1880s.
00059.jpg


00068.jpg


00072.jpg


00091.jpg


00113.jpg



Although brick houses are rare in Wallaceburg, there are some good examples, mostly following the
same designs as the wood sided houses typical in the town.

00118.jpg

00050.jpg


This one has some creative masonry, the builder turned the bricks on their sides.
00101.jpg


This one features quoins and five satellite dishes.
00109.jpg


00020.jpg


00027.jpg


00115.jpg


00067.jpg


00054.jpg


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Don't let these brick examples fool you, typical houses throughout Wallaceburg look like these:
00039.jpg


00096.jpg


00038.jpg


But there are tons of these largish, L-shaped houses
00044.jpg


00048.jpg


00121.jpg


00122.jpg


00098.jpg


00088.jpg


00034.jpg




As we move into the Twentieth Century, the Arts and Crafts movement is evident in Wallaceburg:

These have cobblestone detailing in the gables
00052.jpg


00111.jpg



This beautiful home was built around 1900
00100.jpg



Glouaster Place, 1926
00080.jpg



Bungalows?
00077.jpg


00099.jpg


00104.jpg


00123.jpg


00138.jpg


00139.jpg


00141.jpg


00078.jpg


Gambrel roofs
00055.jpg


00095.jpg


00074.jpg





Variations on the four-square, seen everywhere in North America, marking the beginnings of mass
society, straight from the catalog.
00026.jpg


00106.jpg


00124.jpg


00024.jpg


00125.jpg


00129.jpg

wallaceburg2.jpg
 
Last edited:
great thread!


do you have a higher res version of this?

00101.jpg



i wanna see the detail.
 
^^that house is proposed to be added to the Chatham-Kent Municipal Housing Register. This is what it says:

Historic Period and/or Date of Erection:
circa 1900
Historical Significance: Although an unassuming
residence at first glance, this c. 1900 house is
actually a distinctive piece of folk art.
Architectural Significance/Description:
The builder has cleverly used the back side of
the bricks to create an unusual textured effect. It
is unique by provincial standards and is a local
landmark.
Contextual Significance: Located close to the
railway and the old Wallaceburg Brass & Iron
Manufacturing Company.

00101-1.jpg
 
thanks flar!

such a beautiful pattern! i think that's the first time i've ever seen a house like that.
 
Wallaceburg,Ontario Houses...

Flar: Good tour of the housing stock of your hometown! There are many good styles of houses there - even the ones that were a little rough around the edges looked good! I have a fondness for brick and stone like the homes in pics #9-16 and #37-46 and others scattered about the thread.

I especially like the Steinhoff home in pic #16,the Second Empire style in pics #32 and 33,the home pictured in #61 but my favorite single home of all is the sturdy brick home in pic -#65.- If you have any further info on that one it would be appreciated! LI MIKE
 
Flar: Good tour of the housing stock of your hometown! There are many good styles of houses there - even the ones that were a little rough around the edges looked good! I have a fondness for brick and stone like the homes in pics #9-16 and #37-46 and others scattered about the thread.

I especially like the Steinhoff home in pic #16,the Second Empire style in pics #32 and 33,the home pictured in #61 but my favorite single home of all is the sturdy brick home in pic -#65.- If you have any further info on that one it would be appreciated! LI MIKE

I have no extra info on #65. It's right along the east branch of the Sydenham River in an area that has several of the nicest and largest houses in Wallaceburg (including both Steinhoff houses). I would guess it was built in the 1920s.
 
Do you have a book called "Looking for Old Ontario" - written by a UT-Erindale Prof who goes into great detail about Ontario vernacular artchitecture and landscaping. It's a must have for any amateur historian in this province.
 
Do you have a book called "Looking for Old Ontario" - written by a UT-Erindale Prof who goes into great detail about Ontario vernacular artchitecture and landscaping. It's a must have for any amateur historian in this province.

No, but I'm going to look for it. Thanks!
 
Love this site... I wish I could find more information on my house in Wallaceburg. was told it was built before 1880 maybe back in the 1850's and I have found many things in the walls dating from 1800's, flags from the 1800's all rolled up. Even found a wedding invitation with Mickel and McCoy that took place at Maple grove in Wallaceburg Ontario? <--- can’t find this place or house either :). A letter form the 28th Jan 1838 or 58, from L.H Johnston to W.J.L Duncan. Did research and found that Mr. Johnston owned all the land from my house to the river forks and was part of the original Baldoon settlement, I’ve donated everything to the town museum in Wallaceburg and are now located in their safe. I am trying to locate old pictures of my brick house so I can restore the front porch , its 00067.jpg ,,504 Elgin/creek the one with the odd ball white front addition added on. Keep up the great work... Robert Kuras
 

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