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It takes 43 minutes to go from Conestoga to Fairway station [google maps]. There are 15 trains available. if we take 3 trains for spares (roughly 20% spare ratio), roughly speaking:
For 10 min peak frequency: we need 2*(43 m)/10m = 8.6 trains (rounded to 9 trains)
For 7.5 min peak frequency: we need 2*(43 m)/7.5m = 11.4 trains (rounded to 12 trains)
For 5 min peak frequency: we need 2*(43 m)/5m = 17.2 trains (rounded to 18 trains)

You could have 10 frequency with some double unit trains though thats probably not advisable. As we can see here, 7.5 min is the max frequency with 1 unit trains. This makes sense as 7.5 minute frequencies were the original planned launch frequency in 2019 though it never was in place due to the pandemic.
You can't just multiply the travel time by two to get the round trip time. You need to add terminal time at both ends to account for the time required for the operator to go to the other end of the car and set up for the other direction, as well as the recovery time required to neutralize delays.
 
Even if you include the, layover time (6-7 min) depending on direction, the overall story does not change much

For 10 min peak frequency: we need 2*(43 m+6m)/10m = 9.8 train (rounded to 10 ) [prev 8.6 trains (rounded to 9 )]
For 7.5 min peak frequency: we need 2*(43 m+6m)/7.5m = 13.0666666667 trains (rounded to13) [prev 11.4 trains (rounded to 12 )]
For 5 min peak frequency: we need 2*(43 m+6m)/5m = 19.6 trains (rounded to 20) [prev 17.2 trains (rounded to 18 )]

note: most of that layover time is to maintain a clock face schedule and it could be reduced given the ION rarely faces delays.

In other news: https://kitchener.ctvnews.ca/the-mi...llion-land-deal-for-new-transit-hub-1.6758684
 
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From the above:

1707316920975.png


****

Region doesn't yet have all the ducks lined up to get shovels in the ground on this, but at least there is progress.
 
From the above:

View attachment 538775

****

Region doesn't yet have all the ducks lined up to get shovels in the ground on this, but at least there is progress.

The Region already owns everything that they needed for the transit hub to go ahead, the platforms as well as the transit hub is on land the Region previously owned between King and Duke. Everything for the transit hub was self contained to that site.

Phase 1 which includes the bus infrastructure, station platforms as well as various other pieces of infrastructure and Phase 2 is the actual transit hub. Both of those phases can occur on those previously owned lands. The most likely reason they ended up purchasing these new lands was because of the legal fallout from the encampment at Weber/Victoria, the Region was planning on using that site for staging and an off site parking lot, but due to the court ruling they cannot evict those at the encampment. The Region is likely planning for the new Duke/Victoria property to be for the staging/parking lot.
 
From the Finch West LRT thread:

My fear is the LRT would end up like the ion LRT ,which is a great project, but runs at a snail pace.

I keep seeing this, but it actually doesn't. It's faster than the iXpress bus it replaced at all times of the day; waaay faster during peak times.

The signal priority works well, southbound from the hospital to Central Station is magic, and anyone demanding priority for Finch West, Eglinton, or Hurontario should treat themselves to this peek at what their world could be. That said, there are some issues that should be solvable:

- For nearside stops, the signal should trigger and the pedestrian crosswalks start counting the moment the operator closes the doors. Trains shouldn't have to inch a few meters from the platform to stop on a loop and then wait for the signal to start cycling. This would resolve a lot of the issues in downtown Kitchener. Better yet, put the loop at the stop and trigger the light when the train pulls in. By the time the ped countdown's finished and the cross traffic stopped, the train should be departing. If it's not and it misses the 10 second window for its transit signal, well; then it waits a cycle. If this happens consistently, tune it with with the necessary extra seconds delay to where missed cycles become a true exception rather than the rule. This should be a solvable problem.

- The magical priority waves should be able to continue around a corner. For whatever reason though, it feels like the programmers treat each corner as a reset button that blows the wave.

- There's a mysterious southbound slowdown at the facing point freight crossover in Waterloo Park. This is a movable frog switch; trains should NOT have to crawl through it, and the northbound train certainly doesn't. If it's the track geometry, rework it. If it's an ATP glitch, debug and resolve it. This has been going on since a few months after the line opened (perhaps since the day they enabled ATP), why has it not been fixed?

- There's another mysterious slowdown southbound after clearing the expressway tunnel and crossing the creek bridge 600 metres ahead of Hayward. I get that the Hayward S is an awkward situation forced by CN/CP not giving up the border of their interchange yard, but this happens well ahead of it, and in another ATP section just like Waterloo Park. Fix it. Heck, add a new signal block if that's what it takes.

I'd bet that simply resolving these could shave 5 minutes from the end-to-end trip time.

As a car driver, I also take issue with the signal programming: The gates for the Courtland Ave crossing drop far too early, holding up a lot of traffic unnecessarily and even backing up onto Manitou. Other gated crossings have developed similar issues, although there's still the odd one that's stellar in its brevity. I don't understand why these aren't measured *, evaluated, and the predictors tuned on an annual basis. If that's not in the current contract with Keolis, then it bloody well better be in the next one...

---

* Just shoot some video and note the time stamps, or do frame counts + 1 if you need absolute accuracy without undershooting, but there's no need to mobilize the expensive stopwatch and clipboard crews that were used during commissioning.
 
From the Finch West LRT thread:



I keep seeing this, but it actually doesn't. It's faster than the iXpress bus it replaced at all times of the day; waaay faster during peak times.
The ION takes longer between Fairway Station and Downtown Kitchener than the former 200 iXpress; 17-20 minutes vs 11-16 minutes. Marginal difference, but it exists.

Coupled with the concerns you raise and the average user is more than entitled to express their disappointment in a project that was sold to the public as “Rapid Transit” throughout its entire planning stage.

At least it achieved its objective in other areas..
 
The ION takes longer between Fairway Station and Downtown Kitchener than the former 200 iXpress; 17-20 minutes vs 11-16 minutes. Marginal difference, but it exists.

Coupled with the concerns you raise and the average user is more than entitled to express their disappointment in a project that was sold to the public as “Rapid Transit” throughout its entire planning stage.

At least it achieved its objective in other areas..

Between downtown and Fairway there's more than a few improvements they could make to speed up the route, the entire section from Mill to Block Line comes to mind, the slow down before the bridge in the train corridor, the slow order on either side of the Hayward S bend etc. Alot of it has to do with ATP, those issues didn't exist when the route operated without it.

Another thing to realize is the Region would be entirely crippled from a public transit perspective if the LRT didn't exist, there is no way the 200 would be able to carry the peak demand that's being seen, the LRT during peak (UW to DTK) is getting really close to capacity, and many other routes are in very similar situations (12, 201). The 200 and other routes would not be able to carry the loading we're seeing today without running 5 minute frequencies and at that point it cannot carry any increased loading.

The LRT still has capacity for a significant increase in riders which it's going to need considering the thousands of unbuilt units without parking. The 200 or any equivalent would not have capacity for that.
 
Between downtown and Fairway there's more than a few improvements they could make to speed up the route, the entire section from Mill to Block Line comes to mind, the slow down before the bridge in the train corridor, the slow order on either side of the Hayward S bend etc. Alot of it has to do with ATP, those issues didn't exist when the route operated without it.

Another thing to realize is the Region would be entirely crippled from a public transit perspective if the LRT didn't exist, there is no way the 200 would be able to carry the peak demand that's being seen, the LRT during peak (UW to DTK) is getting really close to capacity, and many other routes are in very similar situations (12, 201). The 200 and other routes would not be able to carry the loading we're seeing today without running 5 minute frequencies and at that point it cannot carry any increased loading.

The LRT still has capacity for a significant increase in riders which it's going to need considering the thousands of unbuilt units without parking. The 200 or any equivalent would not have capacity for that.

I think you're entirely on point above; but I would encourage you and others to lobby to make the ION better, specifically faster, and more frequent, so as to drive the modal split in the right direction, and to make sure service is proactively provided rather than reactively.
 
From the Finch West LRT thread:



I keep seeing this, but it actually doesn't. It's faster than the iXpress bus it replaced at all times of the day; waaay faster during peak times.

The signal priority works well, southbound from the hospital to Central Station is magic, and anyone demanding priority for Finch West, Eglinton, or Hurontario should treat themselves to this peek at what their world could be. That said, there are some issues that should be solvable:

- For nearside stops, the signal should trigger and the pedestrian crosswalks start counting the moment the operator closes the doors. Trains shouldn't have to inch a few meters from the platform to stop on a loop and then wait for the signal to start cycling. This would resolve a lot of the issues in downtown Kitchener. Better yet, put the loop at the stop and trigger the light when the train pulls in. By the time the ped countdown's finished and the cross traffic stopped, the train should be departing. If it's not and it misses the 10 second window for its transit signal, well; then it waits a cycle. If this happens consistently, tune it with with the necessary extra seconds delay to where missed cycles become a true exception rather than the rule. This should be a solvable problem.

- The magical priority waves should be able to continue around a corner. For whatever reason though, it feels like the programmers treat each corner as a reset button that blows the wave.

- There's a mysterious southbound slowdown at the facing point freight crossover in Waterloo Park. This is a movable frog switch; trains should NOT have to crawl through it, and the northbound train certainly doesn't. If it's the track geometry, rework it. If it's an ATP glitch, debug and resolve it. This has been going on since a few months after the line opened (perhaps since the day they enabled ATP), why has it not been fixed?

- There's another mysterious slowdown southbound after clearing the expressway tunnel and crossing the creek bridge 600 metres ahead of Hayward. I get that the Hayward S is an awkward situation forced by CN/CP not giving up the border of their interchange yard, but this happens well ahead of it, and in another ATP section just like Waterloo Park. Fix it. Heck, add a new signal block if that's what it takes.

I'd bet that simply resolving these could shave 5 minutes from the end-to-end trip time.

As a car driver, I also take issue with the signal programming: The gates for the Courtland Ave crossing drop far too early, holding up a lot of traffic unnecessarily and even backing up onto Manitou. Other gated crossings have developed similar issues, although there's still the odd one that's stellar in its brevity. I don't understand why these aren't measured *, evaluated, and the predictors tuned on an annual basis. If that's not in the current contract with Keolis, then it bloody well better be in the next one...

---

* Just shoot some video and note the time stamps, or do frame counts + 1 if you need absolute accuracy without undershooting, but there's no need to mobilize the expensive stopwatch and clipboard crews that were used during commissioning.
There does seem to be some signaling glitches with the ATP - we should be able to hit 70 on the Waterloo Spur. Places with an up arrow or down arrow seem to be the places where the ATP kicks in. I was talking to a signaling engineer (who did not work on this project) and they think that the ATP speed blocks are incorrectly placed (too far behind stations) so there is improper control.

Getting clarity about this issue will definitely be a priority of Tritag in the future

Linking the flowchart for reference
I have been working on a technical document outlining the reasons why ion is slow (snippet below) (note this is non-official)View attachment 523335
SideNote: we have updated planning info for the Cambridge-Guelph Rail concept:
1708545450886.png
 
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