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MrGoose

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Just do Japanese zoning across the entire province.

Residential neighborhoods are all automatically zoned to 4 stories with commercial space at ground level. Anything within 250 meters of a transit stop is automatically zoned to 20 stories. Anything within 500 meters is automatically zoned to 10.

Let the housing market crash, maybe we’ll finally get some business investment in our economy instead of (literal) rent seeking.

If the federal government actually wants 100million Canadians by 2100, the first step is making Toronto a mega city.
 

AlbertC

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Toronto

Could missing middle housing help solve Scarborough's affordable housing woes?


Jan 7, 2022

Ionview, on the Crosstown light-rail line and close to a transit hub, is one of six districts where city planners will study this proposed so-called multiplexing in 2022.

Realtors and the Toronto Region Board of Trade want to see it happen, and so do people who want to buy or rent homes in a city that’s never been so unaffordable.

But opening suburbs up to townhouses, duplexes, triplexes, garden suites and even low-rise apartment buildings is something many current residents will fight.

“To me, there’s nothing in this that’s gentle intensification,” said Hardy, a planner and director of Scarborough Community Revitalization Organization.

“Here and there, having higher density housing can be helpful. But this is a full-scale rethinking of what the city is about.”

Roughly one quarter of Toronto’s land — such as the Golden Mile west of Ionview — is targeted for growth and three quarters isn’t, partly thanks to zoning permitting only detached homes on 31 per cent.

Though many North American cities and entire U.S. states have introduced multiplexing, the current Toronto City Council is unlikely to agree.
Staff spent 2020 proposing a city-wide system for legal rooming houses. It turned embarrassing for Mayor John Tory, who couldn’t convince councillors in Scarborough, Etobicoke or North York to accept it.

Scarborough homeowners fought the rooming house proposal, which the city called “multi-tenant” housing. Michael Thompson, Ionview’s councillor and a deputy mayor, says residents will see multiplexing the same way.

“It’s an impact and an intrusion on the way neighbourhoods are now,” he said.

“It’s going to be met with, I believe, tremendous opposition.”

In contrast, 83 per cent of 6,400 survey responses the city collected this fall strongly agreed with allowing multiplexing citywide.

Hardy, founder of a thinktank called the Institute for New Suburbanism, doesn’t say more affordable housing isn’t needed or oppose more density around transit, but he argued there’s no evidence missing middle options will be affordable.

Equity-supporting arguments for multiplexing are “outrageous” in multicultural Scarborough, and neighbourhoods open to housing options won’t be better for climate change, since carbon-absorbing lawns and trees will be lost, Hardy said.

In a recent city meeting, however, Phil Pothen of the advocacy group Environmental Defence called city-wide multiplexing “an environmental imperative” because it would help preserve natural heritage and agricultural lands outside Toronto.

Prof. Frank Clayton, senior fellow at Ryerson University’s Centre for Urban Research and Land Development, said missing middle housing isn’t a threat to neighbourhoods but a chance for people to stay in them.

“Your kids can’t afford to live where you do, so where do you want your kids to live? It could be a townhouse down the street,” he said.

Suburban councillors will vote against multiplexing, Clayton said, but it will happen anyway, because the province, with sweeping powers, will force it through.

Many people want housing that’s “ground-related” instead of in highrises, and multiplexing can bring financial benefits to single-home owners, he said.

Recently, Gregg Lintern, Toronto’s chief planner, told city councillors missing middle housing won’t be “capital-A affordable housing,” but market housing. The multiplexing proposal Expanding Housing Options in Neighbourhoods, he suggested, is meant to support climate action, inclusion and better utility of space in the city.

City staff will assess how infrastructure in detached-home neighbourhoods would accommodate growth before bringing recommendations to councillors before the end of the council term.

City-wide roundtables and ward-level meetings on multiplexing may begin in late February or early March. Ionview is a Neighbourhood Improvement Area without a residents’ association, but staff say the city will try to ensure different voices are heard.

 

Undead

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Around 90 percent of the land in Toronto is singe family housing. If anything we are deeply lacking diversity in housing typology. Plus, It would only take a few walk up apartments per block to double the density of the yellowbelt. The block adjacent to this lot would require ~4 buildings (10-15 units each) per block to double capacity, and it's already reasonably dense. Hardly a blockbusting manoeuvre. There are more accurate calculations on this than mine.
IIRC it's about 2/3, but still a lot.
 

evandyk

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Strange column in the Globe today.


Bring on the sprawl! is a strange position to take given everything we're seeing on the climate front these days. I get that in the short and medium term we have to live with the houses we've built over the last 70 years, but who thinks that more of it is a good idea in the long term?
 

Northern Light

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Strange column in the Globe today.


Bring on the sprawl! is a strange position to take given everything we're seeing on the climate front these days. I get that in the short and medium term we have to live with the houses we've built over the last 70 years, but who thinks that more of it is a good idea in the long term?

That's John Ibbitson. A Conservative-leaning twit who hasn't been right about anything except possibly how to spell his own name, since the 90's.....
 

allengeorge

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Bring on the sprawl! is a strange position to take given everything we're seeing on the climate front these days. I get that in the short and medium term we have to live with the houses we've built over the last 70 years, but who thinks that more of it is a good idea in the long term?
It’s also a weird argument to make, given that there’s a lot of developable land still available, we’ve been sprawling like crazy, and prices are still climbing. Meanwhile, we’re more and more aware of the financial, and environmental costs of sprawl.

And his suggestion is…more of the same? It’s bizarre.
 

evandyk

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It’s also a weird argument to make, given that there’s a lot of developable land still available, we’ve been sprawling like crazy, and prices are still climbing. Meanwhile, we’re more and more aware of the financial, and environmental costs of sprawl.

And his suggestion is…more of the same? It’s bizarre.
He doesn't even bother to engage with any of the actual issues, like who covers the cost of initial and ongoing servicing, the climate issue (at all. In 2021! Come on!), transit for people who don't drive, what to do when the two new highways he refers to fill up, etc. etc. Just a mind-bogglingly simple-minded fluff piece that makes anyone who reads it dumber.
 

Northern Light

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He doesn't even bother to engage with any of the actual issues, like who covers the cost of initial and ongoing servicing, the climate issue (at all. In 2021! Come on!), transit for people who don't drive, what to do when the two new highways he refers to fill up, etc. etc. Just a mind-bogglingly simple-minded fluff piece that makes anyone who reads it dumber.

Ibbiton's specialty.

Think of him as a less loquacious Conrad Black, LOL
 

evandyk

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I've subscribed to the Globe for a good two decades now, other than a short period where I canceled after they printed a column from Ezra Levant, so I'm well familiar with Ibbitson sadly.
 

Northern Light

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Can we call him John Ribbitson? He is very much a frog, especially when it comes to intelligence.

On behalf of non-human species, I don't see the need for such unflattering comments about frogs.

I expect them to be far better at catching and eating flies than Ibbitson which puts them at least one up on him!
 

Undead

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Geez guys, a little more respect for viewpoint diversity? You might disagree with the guy, but how do we expect to solve problems when we're not engaging productively with the other side(s)?

Let's also not allow such disagreement to be an excuse for casting aspersions on someone's character.

In at least one fundamental way, he's on the same side as urbanist housing advocates in wanting more housing supply.

You can disagree with the exact form factor of said supply (and I disagree entirely that supply is the primary issue), but there's better and worse ways of engaging. Let's trend toward the former and away from the latter.
 

evandyk

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Geez guys, a little more respect for viewpoint diversity? You might disagree with the guy, but how do we expect to solve problems when we're not engaging productively with the other side(s)?
As I noted above, the column doesn't actually engage with any of the real issues, so there is no point engaging with the column. So there's nothing to do with it but have a little fun.
 

Northern Light

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Geez guys, a little more respect for viewpoint diversity? You might disagree with the guy, but how do we expect to solve problems when we're not engaging productively with the other side(s)?

Let's also not allow such disagreement to be an excuse for casting aspersions on someone's character.

In at least one fundamental way, he's on the same side as urbanist housing advocates in wanting more housing supply.

You can disagree with the exact form factor of said supply (and I disagree entirely that supply is the primary issue), but there's better and worse ways of engaging. Let's trend toward the former and away from the latter.

You know as well as anyone here that I'm a champion of diversity of ideas.

But Ibbitson is an idiot on almost every subject he opines on........

I'm not sure he hasn't been right on one or two things in the last 2 decades.........but that's a slightly worse track record than a broken clock.
His views are by and large ill-informed, incoherent claptrap.

Is there a case to be made for sprawl? Sure..........its not particularly good or appealing or well thought out........but yes, it exists.
But if that view were to be seriously debated, it certainly needs a far more thoughtful champion than he.............
 
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Undead

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@evandyk @Northern Light be that as it may, and I'm not saying you're wrong because I don't know the situation entirely, it still strikes me as throwing out the baby with the bathwater. I'd say the habits developed as a result of such dismissals leads us to become exactly such ossified blowhards ourselves (I know I'm 30 years ahead in this process LOL). Dismiss this one silly guy, it becomes easier to dismiss the next, who might not be so silly, and so forth. A call for humility, civility, something along those lines? Just seemed like a relevant point I thought should be expressed given the times we're in.
 

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